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According to Sky ( http://news.sky.com/story/1288774/home-building-being-hit-by-skills-shortage )


A serious shortage of skilled construction workers is impacting on the industry's recovery.

Experts have told Sky News that thousands of workers need to be recruited and trained in order to meet intense demand for new housing.

A shortage of homes is among the factors fuelling rapidly rising house prices.

Last year just 108,190 houses were completed in England, fewer than half the 220,000 the Home Builders Federation says are needed to keep up with demand.

However, there currently aren't enough skilled workers. During the recession 390,000 workers left the industry according to the national training organisation, the CITB.

Fewer apprentices have joined the sector since 2008, resulting in an aging work force. A further 410,000 workers are due to retire in the next five years.

Mark Aldcroft, who manages a new build site near Stockport, told Sky News: "Definitely bricklaying and roofers, we're struggling to get an influx of them.

"Sometimes we can't get enough of the joinery industry because they're being pulled from pillar to post, various other contractors and house builders.

"Inevitably it does cause delays," he said.

Jay Culbert, who works as a labourer, said he has noticed fewer young people coming into the industry.

He told Sky News: "People have obviously steered away from it because they were unable to make a career in this when we suffered the recession.

"I think people have steered toward those jobs that require more thinking rather than obviously physical, manual labour."

Mike Bialyj from the CITB said there will "undoubtedly" be an impact on the housing sector.

He told Sky News: "One in 20 companies were forecasting that their business could be damaged or even irreparably damaged due to the skills shortage, so we really do need to make sure we fill the gap."

Tomorrow, the Bank of England Governor Mark Carney will outline his plans to take the heat out of the housing market.

It comes as research from charity Shelter shows that rising prices mean 80% of properties for sale in England are now unaffordable for the average working family.

In an exclusive interview with Sky News last month Mr Carney said: "The issue around the housing market in the UK … is there are not sufficient (numbers of) houses (being) built."

Asked if more houses need to be built, Mr Carney replied: "That would help us out."

I have to say that I find this hard to believe, are they just rolling out another excuse for the total lack of government urgency during a housing crisis?

We have millions of unemployed, some surely can be trained by house builders to meet the demand, I remember when labouring was what you did as a stop gap or if you were lucky you got an apprenticeship, is staying on benefits in 2014 just more lucrative?

Edited by JustAnotherProle

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They aren't all unskilled I guess:

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/crime/vietnamese-teen-who-ran-cannabis-3759894

"A VIETNAMESE immigrant will be sent back to Saigon after being caught with £100,000 of dope.

Nguyen Van Hung was sentenced to 38 months after being found with a flat full of cannabis plants.

The 19-year-old had been lured to Scotland on the promise of a better life."

Comedy gold.

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What is happening to Britain? The age of the average Lorry driver is now 56. Everybody is going to university and aren't learning anything useful. My step son is doing photography at collage. How he plans to make a living at it god only knows. I can see him ending up with £50,000 worth of debt and no chance of getting a job at the end of it.

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The problems plain to see:

https://jobsearch.direct.gov.uk/JobSearch/PowerSearch.aspx?rad=20&rad_units=miles&pp=25&sort=rv.dt.di&vw=b&re=134&setype=2&tjt=brick+layer&where=&q=

Must have a CSCS card, Must have full PPE, Must have own tools, Must be experienced.

What happend to the days tha you could leave school, roll up at the builders yard and they would point to a pile of bricks and your 'mate' would train you.

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https://jobsearch.direct.gov.uk/GetJob.aspx?JobID=8408380&JobTitle=Experienced+Brick+Layer+%u00a315+p%2fh&rad=20&rad_units=miles&pp=25&sort=rv.dt.di&vw=b&re=3&setype=2&tjt=brick+layer&where=&q=&pg=1&AVSDM=2014-06-25T07%3a52%3a00-05%3a00

Experienced Brick Layer £15 p/h

Job description

We are looking for an experienced brick layer in the Hampshire area with relevant experience and qualifications.

The work will be ongoing and the working day will average around 9-10 hours.

For the right candidates with the right experience we are willing to pay £15 per hour.

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I can imagine some builders working on BTL properties would decide that working for yourself and getting into BTL was a easier choice.

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What is happening to Britain? The age of the average Lorry driver is now 56. Everybody is going to university and aren't learning anything useful. My step son is doing photography at collage. How he plans to make a living at it god only knows. I can see him ending up with £50,000 worth of debt and no chance of getting a job at the end of it.

The problem is....the country is being urn for the benefit of the public sector and the service sector ( bankers etc ). We need both of these buy they should be an aside to a sustainable vibrant economy...not the actual economy.

Change is preferential but without it collapse is inevitable.

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

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The work will be ongoing and the working day will average around 9-10 hours. For the right candidates with the right experience we are willing to pay £15 per hour.

That's very hard work for that money. They also won't get paid when it rains.

I've employed a few bricklayers in the last year (£120-150/day). They are all 50 +yr old and have a variety of bad backs/shoulders. They say the youngsters simply give up when they realise how much hard work is involved.

I can see wages for this sort of work going a lot higher.

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https://jobsearch.direct.gov.uk/GetJob.aspx?JobID=8408380&JobTitle=Experienced+Brick+Layer+%u00a315+p%2fh&rad=20&rad_units=miles&pp=25&sort=rv.dt.di&vw=b&re=3&setype=2&tjt=brick+layer&where=&q=&pg=1&AVSDM=2014-06-25T07%3a52%3a00-05%3a00Experienced Brick Layer £15 p/hJob descriptionWe are looking for an experienced brick layer in the Hampshire area with relevant experience and qualifications.The work will be ongoing and the working day will average around 9-10 hours.For the right candidates with the right experience we are willing to pay £15 per hour.

Brickies were getting those wages 14 years ago. Then the Eastern Europeans came in their droves depressing wages for years, turning younger Brits away from the trades and scaling back apprenticeships.

It didn't help that post crash the big builders shed thousands of jobs and decided they could build bare minimum and still make a profit due to loony house prices.

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We want the skills, but ain't prepared to pay to get them....9-10 hours/day of hard physical labour, skilled at that, for £150 gross.

Lone Twin will be here in a minute to say it's all hunky-dory.

Not sure sawing bits of wood and laying dried mud bricks on top of each other is really that skilled.

It's definitely a skill, but an easily acquired one and perhaps not the skills a modern economy needs to drive the UK forward.

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

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Not sure sawing bits of wood and laying dried mud bricks on top of each other is really that skilled.

It's definitely a skill, but an easily acquired one and perhaps not the skills a modern economy needs to drive the UK forward.

Have you ever tried brick laying?

I have I can lay about 10 bricks a hour. It's not like lego you know.

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Dunno about that TCON, it is a skilled trade imo. Any punter can build the odd wall, but to do so with consistent speed and accuracy takes training. Plus, have you seen these guys use their hammers to cut a brick down to the right size for a gable end or other gap?

Edited by Joan of The Tower

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What is happening to Britain? The age of the average Lorry driver is now 56. Everybody is going to university and aren't learning anything useful. My step son is doing photography at collage. How he plans to make a living at it god only knows. I can see him ending up with £50,000 worth of debt and no chance of getting a job at the end of it.

Slightly off topic, but just a word of encouragement about your son. I'm not a photographer myself, but I come into contact with them from time to time in the course of my work, and I have a succesful commercial photographer as a client who seems to be doing very well for himself. I'd guess like many creative careers it'll be very competitive, but it does still seem possible to make quite a good living from photography if you're good at it and go about it in the right way, and there are probably more outlets and demand for for it nowadays in many respects. At least that's the impression I get as someone from the outside looking in.

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Slightly off topic, but just a word of encouragement about your son. I'm not a photographer myself, but I come into contact with them from time to time in the course of my work, and I have a succesful commercial photographer as a client who seems to be doing very well for himself. I'd guess like many creative careers it'll be very competitive, but it does still seem possible to make quite a good living from photography if you're good at it and go about it in the right way, and there are probably more outlets and demand for for it nowadays in many respects. At least that's the impression I get as someone from the outside looking in.

Thanks for that. My uncle started a photography business. Weddings ect. Once digital camera's came in it folded. You can take 100's of shots these day's and review the result on the spot. Not like when you had to send them away to be developed.

The main job of a wedding photographer is to get everybody together in groups. He found that people would stand behind him and take photo's as well. Then no one bought his photo's.

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Thanks for that. My uncle started a photography business. Weddings ect. Once digital camera's came in it folded. You can take 100's of shots these day's and review the result on the spot. Not like when you had to send them away to be developed.

The main job of a wedding photographer is to get everybody together in groups. He found that people would stand behind him and take photo's as well. Then no one bought his photo's.

It seems to me that a lot of University is about common knowledge skills that the older populace possess in any case........ridiculous degrees like Human Geography, Media, Politics etc. etc

What we could actually do with is skills like joiners, plumbers, engineers...........

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Thanks for that. My uncle started a photography business. Weddings ect. Once digital camera's came in it folded. You can take 100's of shots these day's and review the result on the spot. Not like when you had to send them away to be developed.

The main job of a wedding photographer is to get everybody together in groups. He found that people would stand behind him and take photo's as well. Then no one bought his photo's.

I'm sorry to hear about your uncle. There's more to photography and a much bigger market for it than weddings though, particularly for someone young and hungry with a good degree and portfolio and who is prepared to work hard and network and grasp opportunities. The guy I'm talking about does product and advertising photography for big brand names and seems to be doing very well and another I've met was doing action photography for adventure sports and then moved into doing film work and seemed to be doing quite well too from what I could tell. Then outside advertising, there's the whole publication, web, broadcast, journalism, and scientific side of things too.

Maybe my perspective is a bit skewed as the ones I tend to come into contact with tend to be working on projects I'm involved with (in another capacity), but they are out there so it's not a lost cause imho.

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It seems to me that a lot of University is about common knowledge skills that the older populace possess in any case........ridiculous degrees like Human Geography, Media, Politics etc. etc

What are you talking about 'ridiculous'? These sort of qualifications seem to be almost requisite these days for taking on a demanding role such as being an MP !!!

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What is happening to Britain? The age of the average Lorry driver is now 56. Everybody is going to university and aren't learning anything useful. My step son is doing photography at collage. How he plans to make a living at it god only knows. I can see him ending up with £50,000 worth of debt and no chance of getting a job at the end of it.

The problem is youngsters have no chance of a viable future on the wages of these lorry driver etc jobs. There's no housing at 3x income. No inflation +2% pay rises. It's all drive down the wages as much as possible now. So if you have no chance of a future doing this type of work you set your sights on higher skilled higher income work.

Photography no doubt pays more *if* you are one the fortunate ones who makes it. The question is what happens if you are one of the ones who don't....

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The main job of a wedding photographer is to get everybody together in groups. He found that people would stand behind him and take photo's as well. Then no one bought his photo's.

Just a thought - but in todays world, the business approach of many wedding photographers seems a bit out of date imho. Rather than working as commercial photographers appear to by charging a reasonable day rate for their time and skills (like the rest of us) then handing over copyright and high resolution files to their clients, they instead appear to low ball each other to get the gig, then hold their clients to ransom charging quite large fees to often unsuspecting couples for individual prints to try to make up for it, while being all prescious about their artistry of what are essentially wedding snaps at the end of the day (I'm sure not all of them do that but I know at least one couple that unpleasently surprised by this approach).

In a world of the internet, digital media and the widespread availability of point and shoot and low cost digital dslr cameras etc. maybe it's the business model surrounding wedding photography that is wrong, rather than photography as a career in itself. But then I don't know much about wedding photography so I may be wide of the mark.

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A serious shortage of skilled construction workers is impacting on the industry's recovery.

...

When they say there's a serious shortage of "skilled" construction workers they actually mean there's a serious shortage of cheap construction workers.

However, there currently aren't enough skilled workers. During the recession 390,000 workers left the industry according to the national training organisation, the CITB.

That's during the latest recession but during the 80s/90s recession about 1,000,000 (1 million) workers left the industry. When there was an upturn most of those workers had found other work (they had to) and the construction industry still wanted cheap workers on tap so brought in overseas workers.

There was little or no thought given to the 1 million UK workers who had to leave the industry.

Now it sounds like the same thing's happened yet again.

Clearly there's not much thought goes into the planning of the UK economy except with things like interest rates and printing money etc.

They're just time wasters wasting people's time and it's no way to run a country.

Edited by billybong

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We want the skills, but ain't prepared to pay to get them....9-10 hours/day of hard physical labour, skilled at that, for £150 gross.

Lone Twin will be here in a minute to say it's all hunky-dory.

That rate is much much worse than it looks. It's contract work so no pension, no holiday/sick pay, and during the winter months you spend half your time out of work due to the weather. It's no wonder noone wants to do it.

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The problems plain to see:

https://jobsearch.direct.gov.uk/JobSearch/PowerSearch.aspx?rad=20&rad_units=miles&pp=25&sort=rv.dt.di&vw=b&re=134&setype=2&tjt=brick+layer&where=&q=

Must have a CSCS card, Must have full PPE, Must have own tools, Must be experienced.

What happend to the days tha you could leave school, roll up at the builders yard and they would point to a pile of bricks and your 'mate' would train you.

Its Technical, you need a degree to understand.

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Have you ever tried brick laying?

I have I can lay about 10 bricks a hour. It's not like lego you know.

Yes I speak from experience, it's pretty simple. It is actually like lego. The main problem for the home brickie is mixing the mortar. The professional brickies get this done for them, so really it's a simple job.

I built 6 3 feet walls in my back garden once. two of them about 10 meters long. This first half of the first wall wasn't the great but after that they all looked good and were straight and true. I wouldn;t be as fast as a profession no doubt but if I did it all day every day how long would it take to get up to speed.

The architect is the skilled worker on a building project, not the brickies.

I can do a brickies job...could a brickie do your job ? I dont know many brickes that could do mine, thats for sure.

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

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