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the_dork

Any Social Workers Here?

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Maybe am having a bad day but seems to be increasingly common...am a financial controller, very low workload and plenty of on site meetings which bring my working hours down below 9-5 so am fairly well paid for what I do. However, I'm feeling increasingly disillusioned with going to sit in an office to earn a living and am thinking of new things. I am 30 and cannot see myself doing this for another 30 years.

I am not prepared to do more than a year's training (I am able to do without the salary but with family commitments can't see me doing loads of studying).

Social workers seem to be a much stigmatised profession and I'm sure they have their fair share of guardian reading quinoa munchers but a) it seems interesting b ) it is an important job and c) I think I'd do ok at it.

With the shortage it seems as though there are plenty of chances to prove enthusiasm and get on conversion courses quite easily.

I expect this is probably not the right forum for this but does anyone have any experience for good or bad of this job?

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I am not prepared to do more than a year's training (I am able to do without the salary but with family commitments can't see me doing loads of studying).

That will be your problem. It's not something you can just go and do, requires a number of different qualifications and study for years on end.

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Brother-in-law's wife qualified recently - I thought it was a year, but may have been two... time is funny and easily passes me by these days! It certainly wasn't 3, and she may even have been doing it part-time. I could ask her if nobody else comes up with more detailed info that that (which won't be too hard!).

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Thanks. It is a real tangent for me but am intrigued. I am not easily shocked and like trying to help people. I suspect the management structure might put me off but it probably isn't worse than many offices.

Other thing I was intrigued by was physio but I'll save that for another day...

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Thanks. It is a real tangent for me but am intrigued. I am not easily shocked and like trying to help people. I suspect the management structure might put me off but it probably isn't worse than many offices.

Other thing I was intrigued by was physio but I'll save that for another day...

:)

Sent you a wee message

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A relative works in the field. It seems like a job with a huge amount of responsibility to me. There are few jobs which might require you to attend court proceedings where they pick over a case, in detail, that you last worked on around a decade ago and xxx years later ended in a bad outcome possibly as a result of a decision or a missing piece of information years earlier.

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A relative works in the field. It seems like a job with a huge amount of responsibility to me...

Agree, sounds like it can be a tough job - taking kids away from their families etc (even when it's probably in their best interests, still a tough thing to have to oversee).

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Sounds like a hard job to me! :wacko:

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That will be your problem. It's not something you can just go and do, requires a number of different qualifications and study for years on end.

I always wanted to be a social worker....that is exactly what they told me, so I told them if they are not interested in me, I am not interested in playing their stupid years of study stupid game, obviosly the demand is not there and they have sufficient people with the necessary competencies.....so did something far more lucrative without the long wasted uneccessary hours of wasted time studying to earn/prove a few brownie points.....now I do my own community social work for free, no qualifcations required.....funny that. ;)

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Maybe am having a bad day but seems to be increasingly common...am a financial controller, very low workload and plenty of on site meetings which bring my working hours down below 9-5 so am fairly well paid for what I do. However, I'm feeling increasingly disillusioned with going to sit in an office to earn a living and am thinking of new things. I am 30 and cannot see myself doing this for another 30 years.

I am not prepared to do more than a year's training (I am able to do without the salary but with family commitments can't see me doing loads of studying).

Social workers seem to be a much stigmatised profession and I'm sure they have their fair share of guardian reading quinoa munchers but a) it seems interesting b ) it is an important job and c) I think I'd do ok at it.

With the shortage it seems as though there are plenty of chances to prove enthusiasm and get on conversion courses quite easily.

I expect this is probably not the right forum for this but does anyone have any experience for good or bad of this job?

Ha, ideal BTL empire starter job. No only joking. Maybe, you should start your own semi-passive income business on the side, and use the job as regular income until your business takes over. Then you can go to the golf course, lay on the beach, study philosophy, etc, once your income from your business is steady and good.

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It's a mistake.

But as a well paid financial controller at the age of thirty I packed it in to do something totally different and, to my mind, far more worthwhile. Spooky eh?

I did it for two years, it was not what I thought it was.

I went back into finance, appreciated it more, was hugely more motivated.

And as a consequence have done far better than if I hadn't made my mistake.

Go ahead and make your mistake, one life, live it :-)

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As promised.

A good friend of mine is a social worker and it has just drained her emotionally and physically. If you have lots of empathy you will just have the life sucked out of you. If you live a fairly comfortable existence you will find yourself witnessing truly terrible things that go on behind closed doors.

My friend was throttled by a prisoner she was helping when, in a jail, the prison officers left her alone in a room with her client. The client took the opportunity to try and strangle her and she was only saved when the POs stepped back into the room.

I am told, by several sources, that often social service departments are very political and a big part of the job is trying to protect yourself from being dumped on with the worst jobs or being set up by other colleagues who are filling your back with knives.

Sounds a truly horrendous job. I am sure most go into it with good intentions but it apparently just wears down and destroys many.

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It's a mistake.

But as a well paid financial controller at the age of thirty I packed it in to do something totally different and, to my mind, far more worthwhile. Spooky eh?

I did it for two years, it was not what I thought it was.

I went back into finance, appreciated it more, was hugely more motivated.

And as a consequence have done far better than if I hadn't made my mistake.

Go ahead and make your mistake, one life, live it :-)

Thanks to everyone, especially this. Very honest. Low motivation for current work is certainly a poor reason for going into something else.

What do you mean 'not what I thought it was'?

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As promised.

A good friend of mine is a social worker and it has just drained her emotionally and physically. If you have lots of empathy you will just have the life sucked out of you. If you live a fairly comfortable existence you will find yourself witnessing truly terrible things that go on behind closed doors.

My friend was throttled by a prisoner she was helping when, in a jail, the prison officers left her alone in a room with her client. The client took the opportunity to try and strangle her and she was only saved when the POs stepped back into the room.

I am told, by several sources, that often social service departments are very political and a big part of the job is trying to protect yourself from being dumped on with the worst jobs or being set up by other colleagues who are filling your back with knives.

Sounds a truly horrendous job. I am sure most go into it with good intentions but it apparently just wears down and destroys many.

Be warned. One of my close relatives has been one for the past 35 years. She has not encountered any life-threatening incidents like the one above but is constantly exhausted.

She says she used to enjoy her work and that it can be extremely rewarding but in last 10 years or so it has become increasingly stressful and the workload has become impossible to manage. The politics mentioned above sound familiar and she is constantly faced with very unpleasant threats if she cannot complete the vast quantities of work needing doing in time.

As a result of a decreasing budget, in these last 10 years, they have stopped replacing people who have left and those remaining have had to pick up the extra work. There has also been more and more paperwork to complete. She is now also expected to complete the paperwork outside of working hours whereas before, time was allocated for this.

Even when she has been off sick she has been expected work at home and no allowance given. Last year she had a serious illness which left her off work for two weeks. She was threatened with disciplinary action when she returned to work as she had not managed to meet the deadlines. She had been expected to complete the work while she had been ill at home. No consideration for the fact that she had been in bed, too weak to even walk downstairs. It was only when she took it up with her union that they backed down. By that stage she was in such a state that she had to take more time off for stress.

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Fcking awful job. No thanks from anyone. Massive downside risk, poor remuneration.

If you're really that interested in self harm just play The Stooges, Dirt on loop and stub fags out on your arms. Less damage in the long run.

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Thanks to everyone, especially this. Very honest. Low motivation for current work is certainly a poor reason for going into something else.

What do you mean 'not what I thought it was'?

It was academia; I thought that with my work ethic I could make a huge difference in my particular field, really contribute.

But it was just another job, glorified teacher lecturing a standard curriculum. Anything I wanted to do that would make a difference would be in my own time.

So if 90% of my working time was merely a job that paid the rent and contributed little, then why not go back to a job I did actually like and paid much more, and keep the academic field as a hobby.

I never regretted making the leap, and I have never regretted going back to finance.

Do it.

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My mate's ex-GF from uni ran a social services department up north last time I met her about 5 years ago. Struck me as an awful job at the time- this was just about the time of the Baby P / Sharon Shoesmith scandal. She had a high workload and a shrinking budget.

I get paid relatively well for my job in the bus industry because I have to make hard decisions on the fly- but if I **** it up the worst that happens is that bus passengers are late. If you make a mistake as a social worker people could die.

None of that is a good reason not to do it if you think its your vocation- at the end of the day we live in a big government state and so there's a demand for the state to get involved in problem families, and you might be excellent at it. I consider myself a nice caring person but I couldn't hack being a social worker.

The aforementioned mate's ex-GF has always been a serious do-gooding Christian, which I guess is why she stuck with it...

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I hear a lot about social workers on a forum for carers of people with dementia. Thing is, they may very well want to help, but so often they can't do what they and relatives know is necessary because of budget constraints. I hear time and again of relatives being fobbed off; they don't listen to relatives; they insist on taking the word of someone with dementia who says they are fine, they don't need any help, when they can no longer even make themselves a cup of tea, are trying to go 'home' at 2 am in their pyjamas, and leaving the gas on, unlit.

I think it must be very hard for those who genuinely want to help, but are told to use tick box strategies to avoid doing so.

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The real time to get into this sort of stuff is at the start of a Labour government who shovel money into the public service gravy train. That was about 1996 - you would have had a good life up til 2010 when the Tories took over. Now is not so good.

I think as well, this job is almost like a no win situation, if you intervene too early you get the daily rage on your back as "the state interfering in family business". Too late and it;s "what do we pay these people for". And all this played out in an increasingly resource constrained environment.

Avoid if you ask me, but maybe if you think this is the right sort of work for you you could volunteer first so you could find out whether it is what you really want to do. I also think it is well worth while looking into why you want to do this sort of job. And be honest with yourself.

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