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Frank Hovis

Bring Your Own Device

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I wouldn't say I've been bombarded with information about this but I have had a few policy updates come through.

I don't really get this. I go to work and expect to be given a desk, computer, stationery, tea and coffee, and ideally some clothing like a coat.

Why would I want to supply my own computer to connect to the company's network?

But this is the basis of BYOD and when I asked the question about where it's happening at one seminar (where it was covered amongst many other updates) the speaker flannelled massively and muttered something about IT companies.

So as there are plenty of computer workers on here have you worked somewhere that BYOD applies? And if so is this because the company doesn't supply anything or because what it supplies isn't very good or what you're used to?

I've worked from home some days for my last three jobs so am used to Citrix or whatever so can see that you can BYOD and connect into the network without having all the co.'s software download onto my laptop, but Citrix isn't as good as actually being on the network (quicker, two screens) so I wouldn't want to do it at work.

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It is very common with US companies - although BYOD often means that they will supply you a device of your choosing. So, for example, I know some US tech companies where you get a choice of an Apple, Windows or Google laptop.

From a contracting point of view BYOD goes a long way towards you being seen as self-employed. However, if someone is a permie employer then I think it is cheap for a company to ask a permie to bring their own device in to work - why would you want your laptop or pad connected to some corporate network re things like security and them having potential access to your data?

I am surprised if many major control freak UK or EU companies are doing this.

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Bring your own mobile device is on the cards where I work. Already live in a few other countries b within the company b but I think there may be issues for the uk as the company has to supply you with all the equipment you need to do your job?

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It is very common with US companies - although BYOD often means that they will supply you a device of your choosing. So, for example, I know some US tech companies where you get a choice of an Apple, Windows or Google laptop.

From a contracting point of view BYOD goes a long way towards you being seen as self-employed. However, if someone is a permie employer then I think it is cheap for a company to ask a permie to bring their own device in to work - why would you want your laptop or pad connected to some corporate network re things like security and them having potential access to your data?

I am surprised if many major control freak UK or EU companies are doing this.

Thanks, that makes sense of it.

So really it's only a theoretical issue for most companies that HR consultants are using to try to drum a few pennies from by pretending that it's an imminent big issue.

The nearest I've come to it was one place which had hotdesking for everybody (which I can't stand and was why I left) so I was permanently ferrying my company-supplied laptop between home and work every day. I suppose it would have made little difference to me if they'd given me the money to buy that laptop and called it mine.

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I've worked in places where the mobile workforce would manage to break their laptops at a ridiculous rate (I think the average device lifespan was about 8 months or something), I think BYOD is mostly about trying to foster an element of ownership so that people take a bit more care of things instead of assuming there will be an inexhaustible supply of replacements.

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BYOPC????

Surely this is lunacy from the IT security point of view, how is security managed on the device is this more ways to make the employee liable?

I imagine its a virtual desktop etc using remote virtual servers. So the same really as if using a company laptop working from home ? I imagine there will be blocks to stop you moving stuff to your own desktop / drives ?

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Thanks, that makes sense of it.

So really it's only a theoretical issue for most companies that HR consultants are using to try to drum a few pennies from by pretending that it's an imminent big issue.

The nearest I've come to it was one place which had hotdesking for everybody (which I can't stand and was why I left) so I was permanently ferrying my company-supplied laptop between home and work every day. I suppose it would have made little difference to me if they'd given me the money to buy that laptop and called it mine.

I have had one 'hotdesking' client, a telco, I won't name them as I would not want to give them the oxygen of publicity ;) .

I hated hotdesking (and loathe the client) but I think the way to cope is to bring a load of personal items (picture of your partner, furry gonk thing* to stick on your monitor, etc.) to personalise your space. Then pack it all up and take it home with you every evening.

*It may save time if your partner actually is a furry gonk; fewer things to pack.

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People bring their own because the company hardware is often crap. It's the latest cost cutting wheeze by the bean counters I reckon - who are already too stupid to see that supplying crappy cheaper hardware that makes staff slower, frustrated and demotivated.

My company has something like this. You get assigned a computer of your boss' choice - usually a laptop. You are then responsible for it - including damage (which caused a massive who-ha so they've basically backed down on that). Some people are assumed to be mobile, and can take theirs out of the office, others can't.

In addition, if you don't like the company hardware, you can bring your own laptop, tablet or phone and connect it the company systems (most of which are available outside of the office too). I believe most contacts/email/access etc can be remotely wiped - but obviously doesn't stop you keep copies if you wanted to.

As a mostly a homeworker, I'm yet to be upgraded. My company hardware is a massive desktop PC which is somewhat impractical for using on the train - so I use my own Macbook Pro and gave the beast back to them. I'll probably keep using my own laptop given the likely future hardware on offer from said company; noisy, heavy lumpen Dells with not quite enough usb ports to plug in a mouse, video camera and headset at the same time so my colleagues are constantly swapping.

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People bring their own because the company hardware is often crap. It's the latest cost cutting wheeze by the bean counters I reckon - who are already too stupid to see that supplying crappy cheaper hardware that makes staff slower, frustrated and demotivated.

I have more computing power and a better internet connection at home than I do at work! I've just waited 6 months for a DVD writer, as my laptop was supplied with a reader only (for salesmen), but this is a software department, and I occasionally have to burn DVDs. The USB DVD writer (yes the only one) at the office is wonky and looks quite old, and nobody knows who has it!

I just bought one for work use! When you see the size of the company I work for, you will weep, as they can't organise anything!

I wouldn't bring any other "devices" into the office!

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I'd be very unwilling to use my own stuff for work (there are various reasons why it wouldn't happen with my place anyway). It's the company's job to provide whatever is needed for the job, so "choose which one you want and we'll buy it" schemes are OK.

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I have more computing power and a better internet connection at home than I do at work! I've just waited 6 months for a DVD writer, as my laptop was supplied with a reader only (for salesmen), but this is a software department, and I occasionally have to burn DVDs. The USB DVD writer (yes the only one) at the office is wonky and looks quite old, and nobody knows who has it!

I just bought one for work use! When you see the size of the company I work for, you will weep, as they can't organise anything!

I wouldn't bring any other "devices" into the office!

This is where you take advantage of the misc office equipment under £100 budget line that requires no approval. I have heard of techs ordering up the various parts of a computer, each under £100, so they can build their own.

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My company has it as an option for people who want it. It's not really a cost saving measure, although I assume it does save some money overall, it's mainly about stopping people from complaining about having to carry two mobile phones. We use something called 'good technology' which is a stupid name and a fairly nasty app but it does mean you can read your work email on an iphone or android mobile. Personally I've stuck with my corporate BB for works stuff and a private BB for my own use.

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This is where you take advantage of the misc office equipment under £100 budget line that requires no approval. I have heard of techs ordering up the various parts of a computer, each under £100, so they can build their own.

Budget? I have none!

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I kind of like having a crap work Bb (no touch screen) for work and my own separate. For where I work it's about "productivity" e.g you're quicker at using your own phone. Not sure it stacks up :)

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Budget? I have none!

I usually have the biggest budget in the company but sod all control over it as it's the central costs like insurance and utilities.

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Where I am (oil company in middle east) it is gaining in popularity for people to check their email on their own phones and tablets. I'm avoiding it like the plague as it means installing apps which (I believe) will allow the company to remotely wipe your device if they think you've lost it (or you've upset the wrong manager).

Further, I don't want to get work emails popping up on my personal devices. If work want me to have access to email when I'm out of the office they can supply a device... which I can accidentally leave in a drawer at work...

My wife can pick up her work email on her home laptop (via the Windows 8 mail app) but once you connect it up, it forces your screen saver to kick in after 30 seconds of inactivity and makes you enter your password to unlock it (even if you have previously set it so the password is not required) so we took it off again (you then have to dig through a bunch of settings to get screen saver and password back to normal).

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Fortunately, personal devices are banned from where I work unless there's a legitimate reason to need them, and, when there is, they're only allowed to connect to the open wi-fi.

The whole idea seems insane to me.

Edit: that said, I remember reading something recently about Blackberry adding a feature where the phone or tablet could be split into work and personal contexts where neither had access to files from the other, so maybe something like that could work.

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