Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
ʎqɐqɹǝʞɐɥs

Ftbers Told Off Again

Recommended Posts

This is the second reference this week of FTBers being told off for trying to be clever

http://property.scotsman.com/news.cfm?id=2330362005

THOSE FIRST TIME buyers who have been waiting for a property crash to deliver more affordable homes have seen prices in Scotland rising steadily rising in the last year. A decline in values does not look likely in the foreseeable future. So anyone thinking that they were clever in holding off has probably just realised that the decision will have added around 10% to the price they will have to pay.
Edited by shakerbaby

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do people actually get paid to write this crud? Are there people in existence who are actually thick enough to believe it? I don't know which is more worrying.

Even if you can't there are compromises. Buying with friends is becoming more popular, and Share-to-Buy mortgages will lend up to three times the salaries of four people. Many are suspicious of this kind of arrangement, pointing to the likelihood of one person wanting to sell up and go their separate way before their co-owners, but this seems almost as likely to happen in relationships of two, these days. It can be an affordable way to buy, especially for those already experienced in flat sharing.

Edited by OnlyMe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is the second reference this week of FTBers being told off for trying to be clever

There isn't even a journalist's name attached to that article. Surely it has to be some sort of VI plant, direct from an EA or lender.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The article is almost a direct cut and paste from the local solicitors property rag. It is full of the usual twaddle about now being a great time to buy because of SIPPS is going to make house prices double etc.

At the same time, according to their own Q3 stats, many parts of the town, including traditional FTB flats are experiencing yoy falls (Stockbridge, gorgie etc)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... on the other hand, I couldn't give a toss what VI tripe is spun out, they can't stop the inevitable. Anyone daft enough to FTB now deserves to get financially incinerated and when they feed me the sob story, I will sympathise heartily with my middle digit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Many are suspicious of this kind of arrangement, pointing to the likelihood of one person wanting to sell up and go their separate way before their co-owners, but this seems almost as likely to happen in relationships of two, these days. [/i]

Why do I have to put up with hearing this cynical crap? I don't see too many of my married friends splitting up. In fact I see NONE AT ALL.

These people believe too much of the crap they see on EastEnders.

Edit - Hi canny man!

Edited by megaflop

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest magnoliawalls

Why do I have to put up with hearing this cynical crap? I don't see too many of my married friends splitting up. In fact I see NONE AT ALL.

These people believe too much of the crap they see on EastEnders.

Edit - Hi canny man!

I think most journalists move in different circles from you or I.

So anyone thinking that they were clever in holding off...

Maybe they have been getting an earful from a HPCer

<_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It can be an affordable way to buy, especially for those already experienced in flat sharing.

I.e. " Those of you in your 20s and 30s who we have groomed successfully to accept a Dickensian standard of living which we current property owners would consider appalling". <_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest magnoliawalls

this bit is inane

And mortgage companies suddenly seem to be doing their bit for the severely cash strapped . A new trend in affordability lending, whereby lenders will assess how much a borrower can afford based on income and expenditure and not just on salary multiples, could mean that you can afford more than you assume.

How kind of them - shouldn't that mean that the severely cash strapped would be allowed to borrow less?

Even if the value of the market continues rising as it is

:rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why do I have to put up with hearing this cynical crap? I don't see too many of my married friends splitting up. In fact I see NONE AT ALL.

Me neither. I've got several family/friends married and the last one to go pop from memory was about 9

years ago!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The crash is on the way.

You sound like you don't think the crash has started. Perhaps you are basing it on the headline house price stats spewed out by the VIs. I think it has and the evidence is clear. At the bottom end of the market you can get 10-20% off quite easily according to the anecdontal evidence I've heard. That will do as a crash till the real one comes along!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there was a similar story in Times Property section last Friday

They're under starter's orders

But low interest rates and slower growth in house prices have revived interest and lenders are responding with deals that give aspiring homeowners a leg-up. Melanie Bien, of Savills Private Finance, the mortgage broker, says: “Now is a good time to buy because prices are more realistic and there are fewer buyers.”

However, Ms Bien cautions against basing your decision on housing market predictions. “If you are ready to buy now, don’t put it off,” she says. “Many buyers try to predict the market, but few get it right. If you have done the sums and can afford it fairly comfortably, then you should do it, instead of trying to be clever by holding off.”

Just buck up and buy somewhere! - Lenders are doing their bit - its about time that FTB's pulled their weight too!

:P:lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personal reply from The Scotsman's property editor.

I emailed the Scotsman when this appeared, and got a personal reply - see below.(mine first, then the property editor).

Just to say that I guess sometimes our outlook of FTBs against the world can blinker us somewhat. Because it was online, there was no byline, and was in-fact an opinino piece by the Property Editor, with her photo beside it.

NB. If the property editor is reading this and would prefer it not to be posted, please email me and I'll edit this post. As I am the intended recipient and the fact that the email did not contain any legally privileged info I'm posting excerpts.

I was disappointed to read the article

http://property.scotsman.com/news.cfm?id=2330362005 . The writer

laughs at potential FTBs who thought they were being "clever" by not

buying somewhere to live - and that prices have increased 10% during the

course of their inaction. I'm sure it hasn't escaped the notice of The

Scotsman that with houseprices out of reach for the vast majority of

FTBs (only 9% of house sales are due to FTBs - an historic low), being

"clever" has nothing to do with it - while being "young" has everything

to do with it.

As a long-time reader of The Scotsman, the tone of the article really

does a disservice to the good name and usual high-quality content of

your newspaper/website.

If the article is in fact a "puff piece" forwarded by an estate agent,

I'm sure your readership would like to know, rather than dressing it up

as a serious piece of news. The absence of a by-line would suggest as

much.

Surely there is plenty of factual news to be reported on the property

market. How about the OECD's report that UK houseprices are

"significantly overvalued"?

Yours Sincerely,

....

From Scotsman

Dear Mr ...

Your email was passed to me as I am the property editor here at the

Scotsman. I also wrote the article, and although my byline wasn't

printed on the website, in the paper it was included, alongside my

picture, so the item was hardly an anonymous puff piece. Reading the

piece online may also go some way to explain why you took offence,

perhaps it wasn't clear that it was an opinion column and not a news

report.

That being said I'm sorry that you appear to have misunderstood the

tone, I was in no way intending to mock young first time buyers, but to

produce an advice column, pointing out that those who were still waiting

for prices to dip before buying their first home should consider the

very real possibility that they are not going to do so. The figures for

the last year, when even estate agents are referring to the market at

softening, still are returning rises above pay increases in Scotland, so

I was trying to point out that property is getting more unaffordable for

first time buyers, not less. This was in no way trying to laugh at the

inexperience of youth, but to point out the problems first time buyers

face. The tone was intended to be wry, rather than mocking, after all,

,most agree that the rest of the property market in Scotland depends on

these buyers.

I then went on to discuss four or five options to consider for those

who want to buy, but find themselves priced out of the market. I pointed

out that many properties on the market at this time of year were

leftover from a failed autumn marketing campaign - hardly something

likely to be said by an estate agent in a puff piece.

In short, I'm sorry that you believe my writing to be a disservice to

the good name of the Scotsman, believe me when I say that I take such a

charge very seriously, but in this case I believe that you have been a

little too harsh.

Yours

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.