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National Insurance (Ni) To Be Renamed "earnings Tax"

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Earnings tax, Income tax, corporation tax, VAT. Heaven forbid any of that unearned property wealth should get its own tax

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If NI is "earnings tax", does that mean income tax is not paid on earnings? I'm confused. Perhaps income tax can become Compulsory Universal National Tax.

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If NI is "earnings tax", does that mean income tax is not paid on earnings? I'm confused. Perhaps income tax can become Compulsory Universal National Tax.

Earnings tax will not be paid on income which is not earnings. Both IT and ET on income which is earnings.

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Earnings tax will not be paid on income which is not earnings. Both IT and ET on income which is earnings.

So it's new-speak for just another tax. Whatever you call NI, the government can now spend it on anything except unemployment and the NHS with impunity. You can also guarantee that tax - whatever the government chooses to call it - will be paid on unearned income, unless you can afford to offshore it.

Edited by Pindar

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Actually read the article after posting the above and they acknowledge that income tax and NI (or 'earnings tax') are basically the same and they DO want to merge them. Why not just do it in then! Foget the intermediate step!

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So income tax is? They should just mash the two together.

Old people wouldn't like that, it's important that younger workers who have been shafted by the property market also pay a higher rate of tax than older people on an equal income.

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So it's new-speak for just another tax. Whatever you call NI, the government can now spend it on anything except unemployment and the NHS with impunity. You can also guarantee that tax - whatever the government chooses to call it - will be paid on unearned income, unless you can afford to offshore it.

They always have spent it on what they want.

NI won Blair the 1997 election.

Remember "Watch my lips, there will be no tax increases". As I predicted at the time, within a matter of months they hiked NI.

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The renaming will be a precursor to merging the earning tax with income tax as a 'simplification'. The politicians and bureaucrats will then naturally be extending it to things such as Pensions (already technically 'earned' income under Schedule E) and savings. Hey presto you have a lot more people paying tax at 32p in the pound on their income. A brilliant whiz for stealing Pension savings which will have enjoyed tax relief at basic rate income tax at deduction (ie 20%) in most cases but then could be taxed at 32% on payment (ie basic rate income tax income tax plus earnings tax). In fact you could end up paying the 'earnings' tax twice once on in respect of the NI deducted from your wages prior to your original pension contribution (because there is no NI relief on payments into a pension fund) and then again when you get paid your pension. Just another scam brought to you by Britains crooked political elite and needless to say there are mugs on here who are already cheering it on. Don't people ever learn that nothing emanating from the Westminster dung hill is going to be for their benefit

Edited by stormymonday_2011

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The renaming will be a precursor to merging the earning tax with income tax as a 'simplification'. The politicians and bureaucrats will then naturally be extending it to things such as Pensions (already technically 'earned' income under Schedule E) and savings. Hey presto you have a lot more people paying tax at 32p in the pound on their income. A brilliant whiz for stealing Pension savings which will have enjoyed tax relief at basic rate income tax at deduction (ie 20%) in most cases but then could be taxed at 32% on payment (ie basic rate income tax income tax plus earnings tax). In fact you could end up paying the 'earnings' tax twice once on in respect of the NI deducted from your wages prior to your original pension contribution (because there is no NI relief on payments into a pension fund) and then again when you get paid your pension. Just another scam brought to you by Britains crooked political elite and needless to say there are mugs on here who are already cheering it on (

Are we supposed to burst into tears at the prospect that somebody with a paid off house, a £20k pension and more leisure time than he knows what to do with might have to pay the same tax rate as a younger worker slogging out his guts for £20k who sends 1 in every 4 pounds he earns to the taxman and another 1 in 4 to a landlord for his room in a shared house?

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Are we supposed to burst into tears at the prospect that somebody with a paid off house, a £20k pension and more leisure time than he knows what to do with might have to pay the same tax rate as a younger worker slogging out his guts for £20k who sends 1 in every 4 pounds he earns to the taxman and another 1 in 4 to a landlord for his room in a shared house?

You think think proposal this is going to make any difference to that situation.

In your dreams sucker.

Edited by stormymonday_2011

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Subtle NLP to break the association with NI as social insurance and pensions/NHS etc .

For obvious reasons.

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Subtle NLP to break the association with NI as social insurance and pensions/NHS etc .

For obvious reasons.

Do you mean to prepare the way for when they start to seriously renege on these 'entitlements'?

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Do you mean to prepare the way for when they start to seriously renege on these 'entitlements'?

What else could it mean? Gone will be the days when you can simply purchase NI years to make up your "stamp".

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So income tax is? They should just mash the two together.

That would be Tax With Added Tax then.

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They want to tear down the safety net and this is a necessary first step.

After the rename, it silences outraged cries of 'but I paid my National Insurance all these years!'. 'I paid my Earnings Tax' doesn't have quite the same punch.

Of course it seems they'll still take the money. Once there are no public services left and no welfare, what on earth are we paying tax for? Tithes and tribute to our betters?

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Subtle NLP to break the association with NI as social insurance and pensions/NHS etc .

For obvious reasons.

This

They want to tear down the safety net and this is a necessary first step.

After the rename, it silences outraged cries of 'but I paid my National Insurance all these years!'. 'I paid my Earnings Tax' doesn't have quite the same punch.

Of course it seems they'll still take the money. Once there are no public services left and no welfare, what on earth are we paying tax for? Tithes and tribute to our betters?

And This.

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