Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

£2.40 For A Bottle Of Water - You're 'avin A Giraffe...


Recommended Posts

Why not fill the bottle with tap water airside? Whats with the drinking of piss - is this some fetish you have? :lol:

To make my post as absurd as some of the others. As lurker points out, if the scale of the cost, a few minutes work at minimum wage, puts you off you can deal with the inconvenience of the easily available free solution. Its not as if, in this case, the pre-qualification of air travel doesn't already mark you out as not being skint.

Besides the rules allow you to take liquids airside. Containers up to 100ml in a 1 litre plastic bag. Get some appropriate contaimers, fill them with water and take them through security.

Not hard is it?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 66
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

....

The adage should be "look after/make the pounds, and you don't need to give a toss about the pennies".

This is why I like this site. So many different viewpoints.

On this one though I have to humbly disagree. Of course as you suggest earning more is important. I'm focusing heavily on this area also with my earnings up 2.5 times since 2007 (some of which has of course been eroded by inflation).

The piece I disagree with is that you shouldn't watch the pennies. This is for a few reasons:

- most of us don't have the ability to switch on more earnings at will but we all are 100% in control of our spending.

- what's the point in earning a pound more to only then spend a pound more. That's just treading water.

- my analysis also suggests that spending a pound less gives a much bigger benefit than earnings a pound more.

Of course everyone is different but I must say that personally since I started down my Save Hard (Earn More and Spend Less) and Invest Wisely to Retire Early lifestyle my life is far happier and healthier than it ever was.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to know a business director who used to go nuts when people wasted the odd sheet of paper in a photocopier. I pointed out to him that there were more important things to focus on in the business to save/maker money than the odd 5p sheet of paper.

The adage should be "look after/make the pounds, and you don't need to give a toss about the pennies".

That's actually very expensive paper.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is why I like this site. So many different viewpoints.

On this one though I have to humbly disagree. Of course as you suggest earning more is important. I'm focusing heavily on this area also with my earnings up 2.5 times since 2007 (some of which has of course been eroded by inflation).

The piece I disagree with is that you shouldn't watch the pennies. This is for a few reasons:

- most of us don't have the ability to switch on more earnings at will but we all are 100% in control of our spending.

- what's the point in earning a pound more to only then spend a pound more. That's just treading water.

- my analysis also suggests that spending a pound less gives a much bigger benefit than earnings a pound more.

Of course everyone is different but I must say that personally since I started down my Save Hard (Earn More and Spend Less) and Invest Wisely to Retire Early lifestyle my life is far happier and healthier than it ever was.

A pound=100 pence if you hadn't noticed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is why I like this site. So many different viewpoints.

On this one though I have to humbly disagree. Of course as you suggest earning more is important. I'm focusing heavily on this area also with my earnings up 2.5 times since 2007 (some of which has of course been eroded by inflation).

The piece I disagree with is that you shouldn't watch the pennies. This is for a few reasons:

- most of us don't have the ability to switch on more earnings at will but we all are 100% in control of our spending.

- what's the point in earning a pound more to only then spend a pound more. That's just treading water.

- my analysis also suggests that spending a pound less gives a much bigger benefit than earnings a pound more.

Of course everyone is different but I must say that personally since I started down my Save Hard (Earn More and Spend Less) and Invest Wisely to Retire Early lifestyle my life is far happier and healthier than it ever was.

Income Tax and National Insurance £800 a month

Rent £700 a month

Pension £150 a month

Petrol £150 a month

Council Tax £110 a month

Food £100 a month

Woohoo I saved a tenner a month at the barbers...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, my personal experience is that the prices I knew at the start of my life are so divorced from what they are today, that I have totally given up trying to keep track. In fact I probably gave up about 30 years ago because of my lack of interest in 'small' prices. I try to focus on the big costs. Would I not buy a pint in the pub I'm in because it cost £4. Or go without a coffee at one of the big chains. No, would I buggery. There's a lot of pleasure one can miss out on by avoiding regular small treats for oneself because they 'cost too much'. Focus on the BIG picture people.

I feel for politicians when they are asked the price of a pint of milk or a weekly shop.

Agree re treats, but can't say I've ever experienced pleasure buying a coffee in a chain or paying over the odds for a pint. Sense of failure and self-loathing perhaps, but categorically never pleasure.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree re treats, but can't say I've ever experienced pleasure buying a coffee in a chain or paying over the odds for a pint. Sense of failure and self-loathing perhaps, but categorically never pleasure.

Good point. Nobody is saying don't have the coffee just think about it before paying over the odds. One option is obviously to go without. Other options include make a fresh brew at home or even walk past that branded coffee shop to the 'little Italian' coffee house in the side street where it's "half price".

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is why I like this site. So many different viewpoints.

On this one though I have to humbly disagree. Of course as you suggest earning more is important. I'm focusing heavily on this area also with my earnings up 2.5 times since 2007 (some of which has of course been eroded by inflation).

The piece I disagree with is that you shouldn't watch the pennies. This is for a few reasons:

- most of us don't have the ability to switch on more earnings at will but we all are 100% in control of our spending.

- what's the point in earning a pound more to only then spend a pound more. That's just treading water.

- my analysis also suggests that spending a pound less gives a much bigger benefit than earnings a pound more.

Of course everyone is different but I must say that personally since I started down my Save Hard (Earn More and Spend Less) and Invest Wisely to Retire Early lifestyle my life is far happier and healthier than it ever was.

Agree with you.....then anyone can afford one....for some spending more on something makes them feel good or indifferent, for others they feel duped knowing there must be better things to spend it on....so very often there is, money can only be spent once. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good point. Nobody is saying don't have the coffee just think about it before paying over the odds. One option is obviously to go without. Other options include make a fresh brew at home or even walk past that branded coffee shop to the 'little Italian' coffee house in the side street where it's "half price".

Quite.

Read your link re Jane and Joe, and whilst I agree in strict financial terms, I think the 'pleasure' factor is important too and only quantifiable on a personal level. For instance, some people may feel the additional 2 yrs working (at a job they might enjoy for perhaps) is a better trade off than 28 years of misery making savings on small pleasures (or Starbucks on the way to work). But in principle I agree re compounding effects of repeated small purchases which most of us don't give a 2nd thought. SKY, over-specced mobiles/tech and coffee shops being my personal bugbears for instance.

Link to post
Share on other sites

ok I'll play:

- what's the point in earning a penny more to only then spend a penny more. That's just treading water.

- my analysis also suggests that spending a penny less gives a much bigger benefit than earning a penny more.

You can play as much as you want.

The basic fact is that a pound is worth a 100x a penny, so that's where your focus should be.

Same in managing bsuiness, You put in your efforts where you can make the most difference. Bogging yourself down in microdetail is just pointless.

That doesn't mean that you should deliberately try to waste stuff, or not get value for money on lower costing stuff. It just means that it shouldn't be your primary focus.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite.

Read your link re Jane and Joe, and whilst I agree in strict financial terms, I think the 'pleasure' factor is important too and only quantifiable on a personal level. For instance, some people may feel the additional 2 yrs working (at a job they might enjoy for perhaps) is a better trade off than 28 years of misery making savings on small pleasures (or Starbucks on the way to work). But in principle I agree re compounding effects of repeated small purchases which most of us don't give a 2nd thought. SKY, over-specced mobiles/tech and coffee shops being my personal bugbears for instance.

I agree with you regarding the 'pleasure' factor. I'm not for a minute suggesting don't, instead I'm suggesting think about what's important to you before you do and then prioritise there.

Your last sentence was the bit I was trying to get across. Particularly the "most of us don't give a 2nd thought".

Link to post
Share on other sites

You can play as much as you want.

The basic fact is that a pound is worth a 100x a penny, so that's where your focus should be.

Same in managing bsuiness, You put in your efforts where you can make the most difference. Bogging yourself down in microdetail is just pointless.

That doesn't mean that you should deliberately try to waste stuff, or not get value for money on lower costing stuff. It just means that it shouldn't be your primary focus.

Very much agree with putting your efforts where you can make the most difference first. But once you've fixed that one then you need to quickly look at the next one on the list. The point I'm trying to make is that a lot of small leaks can add up to a big leak just as a big leak is a big leak.

When it comes to personal life I have enough capacity to be able to focus on earning more while also watching the £'s and pence.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very much agree with putting your efforts where you can make the most difference first. But once you've fixed that one then you need to quickly look at the next one on the list. The point I'm trying to make is that a lot of small leaks can add up to a big leak just as a big leak is a big leak.

When it comes to personal life I have enough capacity to be able to focus on earning more while also watching the £'s and pence.

I see it as a bit like fitness. People either are keep fit fanatics or slobs. There is little in between.

Similarly people tend to be frugal or spendthrift. There is little middle ground.

The basic fact is though that doubling your earnings is a far more likely way to increase your chances of being able to buy what you want (on this site I guess it is houses) rather than making your own sandwichs. Unless you eat a shedload of sandwiches of course.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I see it as a bit like fitness. People either are keep fit fanatics or slobs. There is little in between.

Similarly people tend to be frugal or spendthrift. There is little middle ground.

The basic fact is though that doubling your earnings is a far more likely way to increase your chances of being able to buy what you want (on this site I guess it is houses) rather than making your own sandwichs. Unless you eat a shedload of sandwiches of course.

I agree with your first two paragraphs. I went from being one to the other and don't for a second regret it.

I also agree that doubling earnings is going to benefit you more now than making sandwiches now. (Why not do both though?) I would however argue that you're probably better off making sandwiches than extra earnings that cover the difference between making and buying if given that choice. Why, because it sets you up for the future. Someday we may not want/be able to work. If for example you have £5 baked into your daily life that somebody else doesn't then you're going to probably need at least £45k (£5 x 365d/year / 4%) or so of extra wealth than that other person before work becomes optional. To me that is a lot of money.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with your first two paragraphs. I went from being one to the other and don't for a second regret it.

I also agree that doubling earnings is going to benefit you more now than making sandwiches now. (Why not do both though?) I would however argue that you're probably better off making sandwiches than extra earnings that cover the difference between making and buying if given that choice. Why, because it sets you up for the future. Someday we may not want/be able to work. If for example you have £5 baked into your daily life that somebody else doesn't then you're going to probably need at least £45k (£5 x 365d/year / 4%) or so of extra wealth than that other person before work becomes optional. To me that is a lot of money.

What sets you up for the future is earning more money now.

Time better spent writing cvs than making sandwiches.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I see it as a bit like fitness. People either are keep fit fanatics or slobs. There is little in between.

Similarly people tend to be frugal or spendthrift. There is little middle ground.

The basic fact is though that doubling your earnings is a far more likely way to increase your chances of being able to buy what you want (on this site I guess it is houses) rather than making your own sandwichs. Unless you eat a shedload of sandwiches of course.

I disagree that people are either frugal or a spendthrift...... Once you have been frugal when you can be frugal without any deterioration in your quality of life, you can then splash out on things that can and will make a big difference to your quality of life.

You also have to take into consideration 'your time'... Earning more means you are having to sacrifice 'your time'....all depends how much 'your time' is worth to you.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I disagree that people are either frugal or a spendthrift...... Once you have been frugal when you can be frugal without any deterioration in your quality of life, you can then splash out on things that can and will make a big difference to your quality of life.

You also have to take into consideration 'your time'... Earning more means you are having to sacrifice 'your time'....all depends how much 'your time' is worth to you.

My time is worth a lot to me.

That's why I don't want to spend it making sandwiches or sitting shivering in the living room. And when I work I do stuff I really enjoy.

You've got it the wrong way round.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My time is worth a lot to me.

That's why I don't want to spend it making sandwiches or sitting shivering in the living room. And when I work I do stuff I really enjoy.

You've got it the wrong way round.

Fine if you enjoy the job you do.....after 30 years doing the same old same old you may have a different view....a job is eight hours a day plus 26 days holiday pa.....a sandwich takes 10 mins to make, and a blanket along with a thick jumper can be sourced for a few pence if you know where to search.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Same in managing bsuiness, You put in your efforts where you can make the most difference. Bogging yourself down in microdetail is just pointless.

True. But the coffee anecdote is useful for most people as, judging by the people I observe anyway, a metric shedload of wonga haemorrhages out of the myriad tiny lacerations of coffee, Sky TV, flash phones, city breaks, etc etc. Even the most materialistic zombie consumer[1] notices the the gaping wounds that'll financially kill them in pretty short order (job loss etc).

[1] Much as I pity these people, I owe them everything. Well, a massive chunk of my divi income annually.

Link to post
Share on other sites

One of my brief relationships was dealt a severe blow by a difference in philospohy.

As I may have mentioned, I run a small, economic and old but reliable car that does a perfect job of getting me from A to B. The money I save by running as cheap a car as possible allows me to work less hard and spend money on other things to make my life more comfortable, such as a cleaner.

This logic was lost on my lady-friend, who owned a large, new Audi that she could barely afford to run. In her eyes, it was stupid not to run the most expensive car you could possibly afford; it just seemed a fact of life to her, as was having to keep the house clean herself. She found me eccentric.

We're all different, I guess.

Edit: And she only ever drank bottled water. I'm not sure if she thought tap water was undrinkable, or if drinking tap water was simply a sign of low status to her.

Edited by snowflux
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.