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Frank Hovis

Unwanted Technology

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I tried a Toyota Avensis but was repelled by the electronic push-button operated handbrake. I asked the owner what he thought about it and he said it took a while to get used to and hill starts were tricky.

So not as good as a normal handbrake, but fitted as an alleged plus point. Possibly it's there just for the reason that Mark says - keeping the price high.

It's not just the camera companies, I'm sure the car companies appreciate having a justification for keeping car prices high. The new Civic, for example, has far more electronics than the one we have, mostly for 'safety' (e.g. backup camera and lane change camera), and that probably adds thousands to the price, and hundreds or more to the profit per car.

I'm also not a great fan of electronic windows, remote central locking (one "lovely" feature of which on mine is I have to do something additional to open the boot), and fortunately don't have the motorised seat adjusters.

These are all things I don't want but car companies fit and charge for.

I have already lined up my next car as being the gadget free Dacia (though I want diesel and roof-rails so not quite the £6k one) because I really don't like these bleeding gadgets even when they work, let alone when they go wrong.

I am seeing a decent number of Dacias on the road and they are good looking chunky cars, I wants one.

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I tried a Toyota Avensis but was repelled by the electronic push-button operated handbrake. I asked the owner what he thought about it and he said it took a while to get used to and hill starts were tricky.

So not as good as a normal handbrake, but fitted as an alleged plus point. Possibly it's there just for the reason that Mark says - keeping the price high.

I'm also not a great fan of electronic windows, remote central locking (one "lovely" feature of which on mine is I have to do something additional to open the boot), and fortunately don't have the motorised seat adjusters.

These are all things I don't want but car companies fit and charge for.

I have already lined up my next car as being the gadget free Dacia (though I want diesel and roof-rails so not quite the £6k one) because I really don't like these bleeding gadgets even when they work, let alone when they go wrong.

I am seeing a decent number of Dacias on the road and they are good looking chunky cars, I wants one.

The only thing against a Dacia for me is that I'd object to driving a Duster around. I don't even do that in the house!!!:lol:

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I love gadgets, but keep this stuff out of cars! When I pick up the "wrong" key for Driver 2. The seat changes position, and the mirrors are all wrong, and the steering wheel pops out! Whoever I lent the car to was a midget!

Keep it simple General Motors. It's more shit to go wrong!

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I read somewhere not long ago that a survey of motorists said a majority of them disliked too much clever gadgetry.

Just more to go wrong, and be expensive to fix, IMO.

I do like central locking on the whole, but mine played me up royally once when I was at the tip, of all places. Had left bag with everything including car keys inside, shut the doors while I was chucking stuff down chutes - and the key sitting inside my bag on the front seat took it into its head to lock all the doors.

Thank God for RAC and nice tip man who lent me his phone, so I could phone Mr B, who phoned the RAC!

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I asked the owner what he thought about it and he said it took a while to get used to and hill starts were tricky.

This is a reason why i would not like it.

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The only thing against a Dacia for me is that I'd object to driving a Duster around. I don't even do that in the house!!! :lol:

Get thee to the kitchen woman!

This is a reason why i would not like it.

It's a backwards step IMO.

I was trying to think of parallels outside the car world. There exist lots of electric can openers at about £10 - £20 a pop.

Now if you have arthritis or somesuch then that's a great product.

But if every time you bought a kitchen it came with one of those fitted (and you were paying for it) you would be a bit narked as most of us are perfectly happy with a manual tin opener.

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Porsche sell cars laden with lots of gadgets.

Then they produce sport versions of their cars, which basically involves stripping out all the heavy gadgets, trim, etc.

For which they then charge more.

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I find THAT THE BLOODY CAPS LOCK ON MY COmputer is always switching on at the slightest touch, think that I wILL SUperglue it, I never use it.

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I find THAT THE BLOODY CAPS LOCK ON MY COmputer is always switching on at the slightest touch, think that I wILL SUperglue it, I never use it.

I just used to pull the caps lock off every keyboard I used. Nowadays, I'm much better at touch typing so it's less problematic.

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I even hate electric windows, what a ridiculous idea, unless your arms are too weak to wind the handle!

Once upon a time ordinary cars had no power steering too! I once spent a few days driving a 1940s truck with crash gears and manual steering, it was no problem. It did at least have electric start!

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I even hate electric windows, what a ridiculous idea, unless your arms are too weak to wind the handle!

Once upon a time ordinary cars had no power steering too! I once spent a few days driving a 1940s truck with crash gears and manual steering, it was no problem. It did at least have electric start!

concur, although i drive a wide car and the passenger window is physically out-of-reach, so electric comes in handy there.

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I even hate electric windows, what a ridiculous idea, unless your arms are too weak to wind the handle!

Once upon a time ordinary cars had no power steering too! I once spent a few days driving a 1940s truck with crash gears and manual steering, it was no problem. It did at least have electric start!

My car doesn't have power steering, or much else in the way of gadgets, but it gets me comfortably and reliably from A to B. The only gadget I sometimes miss is central locking; it's a bit of a pain (un)locking all the doors manually when transporting a carful of kids about.

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I am seeing a decent number of Dacias on the road and they are good looking chunky cars, I wants one.

A burd I know (hippy girl) has a Stepway. It is ok. A bit noisy (this is the petrol version) and agricultural. You feel like you've gone back a dozen years or so in car evolution but I guess that is what you want. I say this through having driven it when friend was too tired to drive.

A friend had a Citroen (which have rubbish electrics). He was returning from Paris in Winter when he picked up his toll ticket. The electric window made a nasty noise and stuck down. The guy from the toll booth help him put a plastic bag over the window but he had to drive 600 km in torrential freezing rain with a window jammed down. The motor had burnt out.

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I thought the whole point of the electronic handbrake was so avoid difficulties with hill-starts/hill parking. I had always imagined that the handbrake would automatically hold the car on an incline, to prevent roll back; as soon as you brought the clutch to biting and the car started to inch forward, then handbrake would then release automatically.

Similarly, it would automatically apply when the car was parked, so that the car is less likely to roll away if left out of gear.

I could imagine, however, that they don't work quite as well as they are meant to.

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The popularity of electronics in cars unfortunately coincides with the banning of lead in solder, meaning that the solder in electronics is more brittle and less suited to a vibrating environment.

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Think the first car I had when they started fitting them as standard was around 2005 so they have been around quite a while now. I only ever use the handbrake when I leave and arrive on a journey so have never had any problem. They do make a horrible sound like a cheap cordless drill when they apply and I think the gears in them are nylon so would probably easily strip the teeth.

Lorries successfully have on off switch handbrakes so it must be possible.

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The "handbrake" on my car is worked with the foot, so it's not a handbrake, rather a parking brake!

It pops off when you put in in gear! Mostly! Something electric happens with a solenoid! I'd rather have a handle you pull, to let it off (no pun intended) like an old Mercedes!

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The popularity of electronics in cars unfortunately coincides with the banning of lead in solder, meaning that the solder in electronics is more brittle and less suited to a vibrating environment.

I have loads of old lead filled solder for fixing older equipment! I don't live in a "vibrating environment"! I suppose you have a book on "Somerset's Imaginary volcanos"? :blink:

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I thought the whole point of the electronic handbrake was so avoid difficulties with hill-starts/hill parking. I had always imagined that the handbrake would automatically hold the car on an incline, to prevent roll back; as soon as you brought the clutch to biting and the car started to inch forward, then handbrake would then release automatically.

Similarly, it would automatically apply when the car was parked, so that the car is less likely to roll away if left out of gear.

I could imagine, however, that they don't work quite as well as they are meant to.

My new Volvo has a conventional handbrake, but although it doesn't have the hill start function, it doesn't slip back when starting on a hill even if I'm just using the clutch to hold it. No idea why. But some gadget seems to be in play.

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My new Volvo has a conventional handbrake, but although it doesn't have the hill start function, it doesn't slip back when starting on a hill even if I'm just using the clutch to hold it. No idea why. But some gadget seems to be in play.

It's probably your foot!

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Wires.

Wives! :blink:

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My new Volvo has a conventional handbrake, but although it doesn't have the hill start function, it doesn't slip back when starting on a hill even if I'm just using the clutch to hold it. No idea why. But some gadget seems to be in play.

I find that my car never slips back during hill starts, as long as the car is facing downhill.

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