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Y:cube: Is This London's £30,000 House Of The Future?

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-27381656

A new housing unit developed by the YMCA may offer one solution to the lack of affordable housing in London and other UK cities.

The Y:Cube is a 280-sq-ft (26-sq-m) studio-like apartment made for single occupancy. It can stand alone, or be stacked into bigger housing blocks.

The units are constructed in a factory and arrive on site ready-made, with water, heating and electricity incorporated into the unit and ready to be connected to local facilities.

The YMCA plans to open its first Y:Cube Housing scheme with 36 of the units in the London borough of Merton by the end of 2014.

A unit costs £30,000 ($50,000) to build, and the one-bedroom homes will be let for £140 ($235) per week - around 65% of the usual market rent.

I wonder what this would be worth after several years of HPI, £60k, £70K, £100k???

Affordable housing that quickly will become just as unaffordable as all the other options?

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in London it will already cost 300k minimum. Also, it's a ******ing horrible slave box.

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Well, you can easily produce a 'normal' 60 sqm 2-bed flat for 50K so its questionable if this is viable outside of YMCA or short term use.

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Here's my 'solution to London's housing crisis.'

Councils to set up small caravan parks on unused brownfield space. Charge nominal rents and provide electricity/water hookup and toilet facilities.

Allow any caravans/camper vans in decent condition to park there. These can be bought second hand starting from £1000 or so. Much bigger and cheaper than silly 'pods' or other twaddle.

Oh sorry, this isn't allowed unless you come from a certain 'ethnic' group...

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Here's my 'solution to London's housing crisis.'

Councils to set up small caravan parks on unused brownfield space. Charge nominal rents and provide electricity/water hookup and toilet facilities.

Allow any caravans/camper vans in decent condition to park there. These can be bought second hand starting from £1000 or so. Much bigger and cheaper than silly 'pods' or other twaddle.

Oh sorry, this isn't allowed unless you come from a certain 'ethnic' group...

+1

One of the reasons this does not happen apart from nimbyism, is opposition from the park home & landlord cartel

I would allow people to site converted shipping containers & experimental cheap units, though I agree no £50K + designer pods.

I would not want to exclude the tiny house movement homes

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The Y:Cube




A new housing unit developed by the YMCA may offer one solution to the lack of affordable housing in London and other UK cities.

For sure the YMCA Y:Cube looks like a top of the range "housing unit". It's even got a posh door and a step.

B & Q and Tesco etc have already "developed" similar housing units (scale model prototypes so far) and at most they cost a few hundred pounds say £300/400 - and for sure they'll still make a profit. Available on the internet as well.

Admittedly they are usually smaller but even so scaling them upto something like the YMCA's size and quality with a bit of extra insulation, water, electrics and some other bits and bobs etc shouldn't cost any more than say £3,000 probably far less with mass production (economies of scale) and at any rate certainly nowhere near £30,000. You would still have to bolt them together on site.

Ok granted £600,000+ set in London.

A prototype in development - the X:Cube?

2-4-x-3-0m-classic-shed-367.JPG

Edited by billybong

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You can buy a caravan for less than half of that. I could have told the YMCA that for free. I'll even throw in a snazzy sticker that says 'c-cube'

You can't stack caravans though.

We need some figures for properly converted shipping containers, not the £28K (IIRC) FOR A 40 FT that the brighton homeless lot quoted

http://www.vice.com/en_uk/read/i-spent-the-night-in-brightons-homeless-shipping-container-housing-project

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My flat is 48.7 square metres. LUXURY!

We have come a long way since Parker Morris. Backwards! Though housing standards/space reached a pinnacle around 1949.

Doesn't address the real issue of course, which is the cost of the land to put it on.

We have so much to thank free rolling crapitalism for. Homes half the size that cost 10x, 20x,30x more. Tat is cheap though

Edited by aSecureTenant

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You can't stack caravans though.

We need some figures for properly converted shipping containers, not the £28K (IIRC) FOR A 40 FT that the brighton homeless lot quoted

http://www.vice.com/en_uk/read/i-spent-the-night-in-brightons-homeless-shipping-container-housing-project

Sure you can. Bring in some scaffolding. Jobs a good-un.

This whole discussion is kind of surreal though. Shows just how far we've regressed since runaway HPI.

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Here's my 'solution to London's housing crisis.'

Councils to set up small caravan parks on unused brownfield space. Charge nominal rents and provide electricity/water hookup and toilet facilities.

Allow any caravans/camper vans in decent condition to park there. These can be bought second hand starting from £1000 or so. Much bigger and cheaper than silly 'pods' or other twaddle.

Oh sorry, this isn't allowed unless you come from a certain 'ethnic' group...

This is the first thing id do if I were PM. Have a mexican stand off with the fat cat housing benefit landlords.

1. Buy up as many caravans as i could

2. Site them at the many disused airfields across the country.

3. Scrap housing benefit. Not cap. Scrap.

4. Wait for the evictions to roll in.

5. Provide temporary housing for the evicted in the caravans

6. Wait for the landlord scum to capitulate.

7. Let rents fall far enough to fill the landlords houses. Or see how many are re-poed to allow new entrants to the market.

8. Those who work and only saw HB 'top up' their rents would likely be able to pay full rent with the new lower rates. Taxpayer wins, they win. landlord lose.

9. Build new social housing and relax planning for however many remain in the caravans. My guess is it would be well under 50% of previous HB claimants.

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In time for sure the name Y:Cube will be replaced by a name like prefab.

The original prefabs were larger.

The original prefabs couldn't be stacked - except on building sites for site offices - and at any rate there wasn't the need due to a lower population and more houses per person.

With all the settlers coming to the UK now (recent official predictions of an extra 6 million by 2024, 14 million by 2040 and towards an extra 70 million in the decades after that - more than doubling the current population) the old detached prefabs won't be adequate to house the numbers they'll have to stack them like on the building sites - like Jumbo:Cubes (J:Cubes).




http://

www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/immigration/10509723/UK-population-could-hit-132-million-warn-official-figures.html

10 December 2013


Only weeks after the Office for National Statistics predicted that the UK will have 10 million more people within the next 25 years, it published new estimates showing that the true figure could be four million higher.

...

That would mean that the UK would pass the milestone of 70 million people – a figure once considered controversial and which some politicians have suggested might never be passed, by around 2024 – at least four years earlier than previously predicted.

Edited by billybong

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This is the future of course. Just a small pod, with computers, power and internet


Edited by aSecureTenant

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Just another BBC fairytale designed to keep you entertained and the young hopeful for a better future that will never come.

This trashy looking mobile home is nothing new and does nothing to solve the high land value underneath it.

Next.

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Who wants to live in a tiny little box? I don't. My parents didn't. Their parents didn't.

These kinds of 'solutions' are like dealing with inflation by making smaller chocolate bars. And they assume that the cost of housing is high because the cost of building a house is high. That is manifestly not the case. Why don't real houses cost 30k? The building costs of our existing housing stock has been paid for hundreds of times over, as each successive buyer takes out a larger mortgage on the same pile of bricks.

It's not as bad as some of the others I've seen on the same lines. But if this is the future then count me out.

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36 "Y:cubes" going up in Mitcham for YMCA, rent is 2/3rds of market cost

Time lapse vid

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-34183526

More details

http://www.ymcalsw.org/ycube/

The Y:Cube is made up of single units costing £30,000 each which can be stacked and moved about where needed.

The new block in Mitcham will see 36 formerly homeless people move into their own "modular homes" with a rent of £148 a week, 65% of the market rent in the area.

Wendy Omollo, a new tenant, said: "After becoming homeless and having to live in hostel accommodation, by moving in to the Y:Cube, I will get my independence back."

She said she hoped the scheme would enable her to save money for a deposit so she can eventually purchase her own property.

Richard James, from YMCA South West London, said it presented "affordable aspirational housing for single people in housing need".

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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Not quite as generous of the YMCA as it intends people to believe imo

£30k cost per unit and rent is £148 per week (£7,696 per annum) = 25.7% return

LHA for the area is £167.22 for a 1 bedroom

https://lha-direct.voa.gov.uk/SearchResults.aspx?Postcode=cr4%2b1bf&LHACategory=1&Month=9&Year=2015&SearchPageParameters=true

The taxpayer is giving YMCA a very generous return

Richard James from YMCA SW London, are you some sort of bandit?

Is this the sort of route that institutions are taking into build to rent? Is this what renters would prefer compared to the current situation?

http://www.mortgageintroducer.com/mortgages/253564/238/Buy-To-Let/L&G_chief_slams_cottage_buy-to-let.htm

"Speaking at the Financial Conduct Authority's mortgage conference in London yesterday Nigel Wilson said L&G and others such as BlackRock – which also has ambitions to invest heavily in UK housing stock – "have to deliver an institutional revolution in renting".

He told delegates: "We need a vibrant private rented sector to ensure there is opportunity and choice for all age groups – renting has to become a perfectly acceptable lifestyle choice for a large swathe of society, especially if good quality, professionally serviced, affordable options become available.

"Let's end the cottage industry of fragmented ownership of Buy-to-let investors with insufficient interest in the need for high quality long-term investments. Renting will become a huge institutional market creating 20,000-30,000 new homes a year – that's a £6bn market."

Wilson also came down hard against further government intervention to stimulate demand for UK housing and said policy has wrongly focused on helping more people to buy homes without ensuring that more homes are built."

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And come on, 'it costs £30,000 to build'

No it doesnt.

.

Indeed, a 3 bed terraced house in a large new build development costs 30 ish K to build - and so the point of the pod is .... what exactly ?

Edited by goldbug9999

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Indeed, a 3 bed terraced house in a large new build development costs 30 ish K to build - and so the point of the pod is .... what exactly ?

Do you have a link that shows where those numbers come from?

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Not quite as generous of the YMCA as it intends people to believe imo

£30k cost per unit and rent is £148 per week (£7,696 per annum) = 25.7% return

LHA for the area is £167.22 for a 1 bedroom

https://lha-direct.voa.gov.uk/SearchResults.aspx?Postcode=cr4%2b1bf&LHACategory=1&Month=9&Year=2015&SearchPageParameters=true

The taxpayer is giving YMCA a very generous return

Richard James from YMCA SW London, are you some sort of bandit?

Is this the sort of route that institutions are taking into build to rent? Is this what renters would prefer compared to the current situation?

http://www.mortgageintroducer.com/mortgages/253564/238/Buy-To-Let/L&G_chief_slams_cottage_buy-to-let.htm

"Speaking at the Financial Conduct Authority's mortgage conference in London yesterday Nigel Wilson said L&G and others such as BlackRock – which also has ambitions to invest heavily in UK housing stock – "have to deliver an institutional revolution in renting".

He told delegates: "We need a vibrant private rented sector to ensure there is opportunity and choice for all age groups – renting has to become a perfectly acceptable lifestyle choice for a large swathe of society, especially if good quality, professionally serviced, affordable options become available.

"Let's end the cottage industry of fragmented ownership of Buy-to-let investors with insufficient interest in the need for high quality long-term investments. Renting will become a huge institutional market creating 20,000-30,000 new homes a year – that's a £6bn market."

Wilson also came down hard against further government intervention to stimulate demand for UK housing and said policy has wrongly focused on helping more people to buy homes without ensuring that more homes are built."

I know most people eventually want a nice home to bring up their family, but I'd have been more than happy with a unit like these in my 20s.

I am surprised that we haven't seen more of this sort of thing - well, actually, tiny apartments made in China to standard container dimensions and shipped over complete. £30k is nonsense - you could make them for $3k over the container + shipping. The main costs would be the seemingly very slow & expensive transportation and installation in the UK. (and of course the land - but you could easily make them temporary + leasehold the land, so that shouldn't be a massive problem outside of central London).

[i'd note that they wouldn't be perfect - container dimensions aren't ideal for the average apartment, and materials are wrong (too much metal, insulation not trivial to sort out, that sort of thing) - but seeing as the building industry in the UK is incapable of providing that sort of value, container apartments is what we should get]

The fact that they aren't everywhere shows that the housing shortage in the UK isn't simply cost + effort - there is a concerted effort to keep things as much as they currently are as possible - mainly through planning rules and customer inertia.

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