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Wurzel Of Highbridge

Has Any One Obtained Planning Permission Recently?

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I was wondering how hard it would be these days to get or overturn objection to a one off house near, say a milt or two out from a village. A one off house on it's own, or even near existing houses.

The only planning permission I hear about being rejected are for 50+ houses, nurising homes, funeral parlours etc.

I wa wondering if there were any recent case studines of people sucessfully buying an acre or so of land and then getting planning / appealing.

There is lots of talk about a right-to-build, so I am wondering if it's any easier to build your own home. It's something I would consider as I often see 2/3 acre plots locally that are currently used a paddocks / horsiculture.

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Ive been looking at a lot of planning applications recently. It makes you despair for humanity, it really does.

The indiginity of someone living next door. Having a car that moves, or a cat that might stroll the street. The idea the new house might have windows. As if everyone stares endlessly at neighbouring homes. (I guess NIMBYs are probably the only ones who actually do that)

Do these NIMBYs actually sit in perfect silence all day long? Would a new neighbour having a BBQ a couple of times a year, mowing the lawn every now and then destroy their lives?

Why do planners entertain these pathetic, anti-social *****s known as NIMBYs?

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Lookie what iv'e just found.

http://www.off-grid.net/2014/05/14/devon-smallholders-build/

Devon smallholders win right to build home

A young family has won the right to live off the grid on their smallholding after a battle to get planning permission.
Dinah and Stig Mason were refused permission to build a house on the four-acre site in Willand, classified as open countryside.
Changes to planning laws mean the Masons can now convert an old barn on the site.
Mrs Mason said: “We’re ecstatic. We can finally live the life that we choose.”
We are going to have to spend a lot more money, but we have got our dream”
The couple, who moved into a horsebox on the smallholding in 2009, have greenhouses, chickens, sheep and pigs and aim to live as self-sufficiently as they can.
Mid Devon District Council rejected plans in 2011 for a straw-bale constructed house on the land because the land was classified as agricultural.
The couple were served with an injunction to leave and the family moved to a site for travellers.
But the Masons went back to the council with a new application, citing the National Planning Framework and its reference to regenerating redundant farm buildings.
Planning laws now allow the reuse of redundant or disused buildings if the development enhances the area.
Mid Devon District Council awarded the Masons permission subject to 12 conditions.
The approval said: “It is also consistent with national and local policies relating to the conversion of redundant rural buildings to dwellings.”
The couple said the straw bale house would have been cheaper to build and to heat.
Mrs Mason said: “We are going to have to spend a lot more money, but we have got our dream and there are not many people in their 30s who get to live their dream.
The couple hope to be in their new home with their two children by Christmas.

Looks like 'some' progress, but not where I would like it. I know after planning changes have been made it takes years for people to learn of the in's & outs of it all.

Prior to these changes you simply would have not been allowed to build there on the grounds that it's not in the local plan etc.

So find yourself any old farm building and you should be able to get permission based on this.

Still I find it a bit *****y that they have to convert a decrepid old building when everyone would be better off constructing a new energy efficient dwelling suited to modern living.

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Still I find it a bit *****y that they have to convert a decrepid old building when everyone would be better off constructing a new energy efficient dwelling suited to modern living.

That would just be far too sensible though, wouldn't it?!

Planning laws in this country are a joke. I guess the key phrase in this kind of clause is that it must "add to the area". Highly subjective and loads of scope for NIMBY sabotage. I would love to see more of this, despite the silly restrictions, but I suspect that this couple was incredibly lucky to have been unhindered.

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Multi-home Jenkins has a laugh-a-minute column in the Graun yesterday telling us that all we need to do is use bedrooms more efficiently and build high density on brownfield, job done. Just not his bedrooms, obviously.

While countryside campaigners push policies which would see their own homes' construction get vetoed were they to be proposed today, their views should be treated as nothing more than naked self interest.

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I was wondering how hard it would be these days to get or overturn objection to a one off house near, say a milt or two out from a village. A one off house on it's own, or even near existing houses.

The only planning permission I hear about being rejected are for 50+ houses, nurising homes, funeral parlours etc.

I wa wondering if there were any recent case studines of people sucessfully buying an acre or so of land and then getting planning / appealing.

There is lots of talk about a right-to-build, so I am wondering if it's any easier to build your own home. It's something I would consider as I often see 2/3 acre plots locally that are currently used a paddocks / horsiculture.

Have not done it personally but the appeal process does not have to stop at a local level if denied ,i know a person who has had multiple refusals overturned by the welsh assembly /westminster but this was a guy who bought rural properties with a bit of land(large plot) then built another house on it but was always refused planning at the local level but said he never failed when taken to the W/A westminster can`t remeber wich but all the properties were mid /west wales

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Have not done it personally but the appeal process does not have to stop at a local level if denied ,i know a person who has had multiple refusals overturned by the welsh assembly /westminster but this was a guy who bought rural properties with a bit of land(large plot) then built another house on it but was always refused planning at the local level but said he never failed when taken to the W/A westminster can`t remeber wich but all the properties were mid /west wales

how much does that cost ?

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Ive been looking at a lot of planning applications recently. It makes you despair for humanity, it really does.

The indiginity of someone living next door. Having a car that moves, or a cat that might stroll the street. The idea the new house might have windows. As if everyone stares endlessly at neighbouring homes. (I guess NIMBYs are probably the only ones who actually do that)

Do these NIMBYs actually sit in perfect silence all day long? Would a new neighbour having a BBQ a couple of times a year, mowing the lawn every now and then destroy their lives?

Why do planners entertain these pathetic, anti-social *****s known as NIMBYs?

Their interests are aligned. Most nimbys are retired. Most planners are getting on a bit too. Change is scary for a lot of people, but terrifying for boomers and pensioners, unfortunately for the rest of us they have the time and control of the right institutions to fight that change.

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how much does that cost ?

I`m not sure but the house`s in question were nothing really special so i would guess not a significant amount

If you need to know what`s involved and rough cost`s (bearing in mind this is for Wales and i don`t know if the process is the same for the rest of the UK ) i can get in touch with the guy

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I've got PP - or rather I had an old outline PP on a site I bought (you dont get outline anymore) and changed it / changed the thing being built on the site completely for the full final PP. I thought I would post something to counter the honking from people who have not built, have no idea of building, but see planning constraint as "the man" getting heavy.

I am not a planning expert. I have felt like I have had to fight my council to complete my house and they are not my friends. When I say fought though I think I succeeded because I tried to come at it from the point of understanding the purpose for the rules and meeting the needs of those rules.

First up what is the council's development plan for the area. If a development fits with that plan then good, if not then its not in the plan so its unlikely to be passed. A great deal of thought and effort and a lot of studying of guidlines goes into the development plan. People who wander up the council wagging fingers and telling the council the development plan is no good without understanding all or indeed any of the parameters the council have to work to in setting it tend to be ignored.

Second up what is planned. If its not in keeping or won't work with the local area (eg its not stone in the stone belt or like a house a few hundred yards away, they seemed to want some sort of watchtower in a residential 60's estate) forget it. A rejection on these grounds does not tend to rise from the public but the council planning committee is policing what is being put where - again that makes sense or the country will be covered with eyesores and to be fair the council is sensitive to existing properties.The developer (aka anyine who builds aproperty)might not mind staring into the bedroom of the neighbours kids ....But.....Moreover I live surrounded by stone houses. I can see the need for having some stone in mine otherwise the landscape in my part of town is going to degenerate.

Third up is the development feasible - want to build in field - fine but what about the access onto the road - who's land do you need to cross - if the person who owns the verge says no then you cannot get to your house - its their land - you might have a right of way for grazing cattle but for cars going to a house?. You will need to sort out drainage - that toilet water that cannot get to a mains sewer - where is that going precisely - no one wants poo in the water supply. If there is not main drain what is the alternative being put forward - it cannot just be sorted later - once planning is given that is it. Power? Water supply? How about rain water - that needs a home too - whats the SUDS plan? There is a linkage here around what utilities are required to be supplied but a council will take into account if what is intended to be built can actually be habitable - the council won't let anything be built that doesn't have a workable plan that meets minimum standards for electric, water and washing/toilet faciities that produce sewage. It can be sorted but people just dont think about this stuff if they have never built before and applications going in short on this sort of detail get kicked out.

Does the development fit with national planning rules - for example garden grabs are a thing of the past. Is the property designed going to impinge on the line of sight of road users, is access on a blind bend etc. Will the development rip up ancient wetland or trees, or wildlife habitat - does someone, or anyone have an ancient right of way over the land to be developed. You think HPCers are militant - try the ramblers or the campaign for rural england, or the NFU who along with a miriad of legitimate interest groups had input into the national rules. Council will, quite rightly, reject on grounds that the development proposed will not work with national rules.

Get through all of that and you are likely to get permission.

Edited by AndyAndy

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I have some limited experience in attempting this but gave up after the initial response from the our local council was tepid.

We have a bran on an edge of village location with mains water and electricity supplied to the barn. We made an initial enquiry for conversion of the barn to a Passivhaus with the submissions including a whole site permaculture design. The proposal was put together through an architect and a planning consultant. Cost some ££ to get it together and took a year to put together. Whole site topographical survey, feasibility study, architect design, planning consultant fees...it could go on.

We got a single sentence response from the officer stating that it was highly unlikely that the proposal would be supported. There was no appetite to actually raise a discussion or explore any further.

I considered whether I wanted to spend my money fighting a system which did not really support positive design or newer ways of thinking and decided that the proposal could end up just being money spent on nothing. Finally we purchased a 60s bungalow adjoining the site, giving us access to the site (though we also have shared right of way to the plot and which we continue to enjoy).

I think it depends on how forward thinking your own council is. I found ours to be uninterested in good quality development. There are nearly 3500 new homes being built against the south boundary of the plot over the next 5 years. Very nice box houses.

So the moral of the story essentially is who you know and not that you need a really considered proposal!

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Lookie what iv'e just found.

http://www.off-grid.net/2014/05/14/devon-smallholders-build/

Looks like 'some' progress, but not where I would like it. I know after planning changes have been made it takes years for people to learn of the in's & outs of it all.

Prior to these changes you simply would have not been allowed to build there on the grounds that it's not in the local plan etc.

So find yourself any old farm building and you should be able to get permission based on this.

Still I find it a bit *****y that they have to convert a decrepid old building when everyone would be better off constructing a new energy efficient dwelling suited to modern living.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/greenpolitics/planning/10986266/Eco-home-made-from-old-tyres-can-stay-because-of-new-planning-rules.html

Another one I picked out of the Telegraph today. Devon, different couple. 5 years spent living off their land living in tents, constructed an eco shack/home, didn't apply for planning permission, are allowed to keep it. While it's a step in the right direction, it seems you can just about bypass planning laws if you're living off grid in a home made from wooden crates, junk and lorry tyres as it meets the National Planning Policy Framework for sustainable living. Since when were tyres eco friendly? I always thought they took forever to bio degrade, and leached out toxic chemicals? Agree, it would be easier to be able to build something fitting with modern living, but then that would be classed as a "proper house" and we're back to square one.

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/greenpolitics/planning/10986266/Eco-home-made-from-old-tyres-can-stay-because-of-new-planning-rules.html

Another one I picked out of the Telegraph today. Devon, different couple. 5 years spent living off their land living in tents, constructed an eco shack/home, didn't apply for planning permission, are allowed to keep it. While it's a step in the right direction, it seems you can just about bypass planning laws if you're living off grid in a home made from wooden crates, junk and lorry tyres as it meets the National Planning Policy Framework for sustainable living. Since when were tyres eco friendly? I always thought they took forever to bio degrade, and leached out toxic chemicals? Agree, it would be easier to be able to build something fitting with modern living, but then that would be classed as a "proper house" and we're back to square one.

Cheers for mentioning, they only had permission for 3 yrs though

forever to bio degrade,

thats an advantage when building rammed earth tyre walls for thermal mass - see http://www.earthship.com

and leached out toxic chemicals?

thats pretty much a myth, unless they were coated with something horrible on the outside / tread etc

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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