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Frank Hovis

Stockpiled Old-Style Bulbs? You Were Spot On

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I did but my choice was based on not liking the quality of light the new ones gave out, having suffered them early on in hotel rooms.

It seems there are other problems:

'The exposure can also significantly increase your risk of macular degeneration. The biggest risk factor for this is age, as it commonly starts to affect people from 60 to 80.

'You will almost certainly exacerbate that risk with low-energy lightbulbs,' adds the professor, who last month warned his colleagues of the dangers at Optrafair, a national education forum for opticians

Professor John Hawk, the retired head of the photobiology unit at St John's Institute of Dermatology, King's College, London, warns: 'There is good evidence that the CFLs that have been foisted upon us emit radiation sufficient to cause damage to the skin if used close by for long enough.'

He says the risk is particularly high if the bulb is a metre or less from your body, which is common as people use them in reading lamps.

'There is evidence that demonstrates that the lamps can not only cause damage to skin, but also short-term symptoms such as sun rash and prickly heat, a condition that medically is called polymorphic light eruption.

Low-energy bulbs are also known to cause trouble to people who have lupus, an auto-immune disorder that typically affects the skin, joints and internal organs. Irritation caused by ultraviolet light worsens the rashes, joint pain and fatigue associated with the disease.

'Migraines and epilepsy are also problems,' says Professor Hawk. 'I have seen 30 skin patients in my clinic who have been experiencing these problems linked to the bulbs.'

This may be because low-energy bulbs can flicker imperceptibly (incandescent bulbs flicker only when they are about to break).

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2626564/The-medical-experts-refuse-use-low-energy-lightbulbs-homes-Professors-stocked-old-style-bulbs-protect-against-skin-cancer-blindness-So-YOU-worried.html

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Not exactly new "news". From Wikipedia:

According to the European Commission Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR) in 2008, CFLs may pose an added health risk due to the ultraviolet and blue light emitted.

Regular CFL bulbs are fine in shaded light fittings, but it's best to use the double-walled ones for close illumination such as reading lamps.

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Wish I had stockpiled, they're rather more expensive these days. Not that I'm bothered about any potential health issues with CFLs but I've never thought much of them functionally. Keep meaning to try LEDs though, I'll probably get one the next time I need to replace a bulb.

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You are getting bad effects from these CFL's? To get any real harm from the UV emitted you have to be a vampire, or you have stuck it up your bottom! Please tell me you haven't!

The traditional incandescant bulb will be here for ages!

It's rather silly for them to be banned!

As for CFLs, they are neither as long lasting or as economical, as we are led to believe!

I have a special UV CFL for geological reasons, and it makes my Uranium glass ornaments light up, which children of all ages find "splendid"

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You are getting bad effects from these CFL's? To get any real harm from the UV emitted you have to be a vampire, or you have stuck it up your bottom! Please tell me you haven't!

The traditional incandescant bulb will be here for ages!

It's rather silly for them to be banned!

As for CFLs, they are neither as long lasting or as economical, as we are led to believe!

I have a special UV CFL for geological reasons, and it makes my Uranium glass ornaments light up, which children of all ages find "splendid"

I'd agree with your point concerning the UV emissions. Exposure to about 3 seconds of bright sunshine on a clear day is about the equivalent of what a CFL kicks out in a month.

I'd disagree on the issue of economics when compared to incandescent. My parents purchased several Philips CFL's in 1997 and about 5 of them are still going. The cost about 15 quid each then but over their lifetimes saved about 70. Cheapo CFL's back then had quite poor service life which is why it was best to stick with Philips or Osram.

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I'd agree with your point concerning the UV emissions. Exposure to about 3 seconds of bright sunshine on a clear day is about the equivalent of what a CFL kicks out in a month.

I don't think it's quite as simple as that. The main problem seems to be the potential for UVC emissions, that is, the high energy UV radiation that is normally absorbed by the atmosphere, by faulty or badly manufactured open bulbs. I'd stick to double-walled (closed) bulbs for close illumination, for both aesthetic and safety reasons.

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I'd agree with your point concerning the UV emissions. Exposure to about 3 seconds of bright sunshine on a clear day is about the equivalent of what a CFL kicks out in a month.

I'd disagree on the issue of economics when compared to incandescent. My parents purchased several Philips CFL's in 1997 and about 5 of them are still going. The cost about 15 quid each then but over their lifetimes saved about 70. Cheapo CFL's back then had quite poor service life which is why it was best to stick with Philips or Osram.

maybe its not UV.

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Not exactly new "news". From Wikipedia:

Regular CFL bulbs are fine in shaded light fittings, but it's best to use the double-walled ones for close illumination such as reading lamps.

Yes, and they are made in proper light bulb shapes too!

I thought UV light found it hard to get through glass, but there are different types of glass compound! Otherwise my UV flourescents would not work.

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There was supposedly a migraine link too? Not sure how many people are aware of that (if it's indeed true).

LED the way to go then? Anything dangerous about LEDs?

Edit: and the fact you're supposed to clear out from a room for 15 minutes if a low energy breaks I had no idea about. Am I being trolled by DM?

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Edit: and the fact you're supposed to clear out from a room for 15 minutes if a low energy breaks I had no idea about. Am I being trolled by DM?

They've got a bit of mercury in them so it'll be about that. Personally I'd be surprised if the amount was enough to do anything to you but people like wetting themselves at the very mention of it.

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There was supposedly a migraine link too? Not sure how many people are aware of that (if it's indeed true).

LED the way to go then? Anything dangerous about LEDs?

Edit: and the fact you're supposed to clear out from a room for 15 minutes if a low energy breaks I had no idea about. Am I being trolled by DM?

I never got the migraines with CFLs but whenever I walked into a room with them installed I'd get a crushing sensation coming from the ceiling making me feel quite claustrophobic and uncomfortable. There were certain shops I couldn't go into like Next or TK Maxx and it didn't matter how high the ceiling was the effect was the same.

They have a very narrow spectrum of blue light and flickered imperceptibly (allegedly).

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I'd agree with your point concerning the UV emissions. Exposure to about 3 seconds of bright sunshine on a clear day is about the equivalent of what a CFL kicks out in a month.

I'd disagree on the issue of economics when compared to incandescent. My parents purchased several Philips CFL's [/b]in 1997 and about 5 of them are still going. The cost about 15 quid each then but over their lifetimes saved about 70. Cheapo CFL's back then had quite poor service life which is why it was best to stick with Philips or Osram.

Replace them now. The paints used (titanium dioxide?) for blocking UV light in these bulbs degrade in time meaning more of the nasty UV A emanates into the room. Afterall the source of light in these bulbs all originate in the UV spectrum.

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I take it he always wears sunglasses when he ventures outside.

Quite. If CFL's emit so much UV then you should be able to get a tan pretty quickly if sitting underneath one. ;)

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Went 100% led in my house 3 years ago after I saw the power drain spike on my smart meter every time I turned my kitchen spots on ..

Not changed a bulb in the 3 years since

I've also got solar powered LEDs downstairs (500 per vase) in a pair of gaudi glass faceted vase's , so there is a constant purple /red background glow when the lights go out....

Its the new twigs for the C21st...

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