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TheCountOfNowhere

Is A Uk Rate Rise Good Or Bad?

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-27325791

"Welcome to the United Kingdom, home of monetary experiments.

After the crash of 2008, the UK was a pioneer in reducing interest rates to as close to zero as makes little difference, and was the first in the rich West to create hundreds of billions of pounds of new money through quantitative easing."

Still no mention on there of the good news from the halifax yesterday !!!!

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

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Ok, here you go:

Is A Uk Rate Rise Good Or Bad for Bruce Banner ?

Still can't be answered with yes or no.

Now if you said "Is a UK rate rise good for Bruce Banner" I would answer YES.

Edited by Bruce Banner

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Still can't be answered with yes or no.

Now if you said "Is a UK rate rise good for Bruce Banner" I would answer YES.

We'll put you down as a YES vote then Bruce.

Too much sangria last night ?

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Is it good or bad? yes or no? Of course the question is ambiguous. it's like asking whether you want fries or potatoes, yes or no.

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tumblr_ldgf8rqYpI1qb5xolo1_400.jpg

Is A Uk Rate Rise Good Or Bad?

There are no good choices anymore. Interest rates are now little more than an artifice to cover the fact that the nation is now insolvent. This was a policy decision by the executive to cover the bank losses with national treasure and hope to muddle through without a revolution. Sadly the prescribed solution negates the desired outcome and we now live in zirp stasis. Normalised interest rates equals zombie apocalypse, nudging interest rates equals zombies set loose in a minefield. Ok nice cheap housing but think about the neighbours.

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Count, you don't seem to get that the only valid answer (whatever a person thinks, or wants for interest rates), is 100% yes - it would be good or bad.

To find out which people think, you have to ask are they good yes/no, or are they bad yes/no. Not are they good or bad yes/no.

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Count, you don't seem to get that the only valid answer (whatever a person thinks, or wants for interest rates), is 100% yes - it would be good or bad.

To find out which people think, you have to ask are they good yes/no, or are they bad yes/no. Not are they good or bad yes/no.

It's not my question....It's the BBc's, follow the link. Make your complaint in writing to them.

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It's not my question....It's the BBc's, follow the link. Make your complaint in writing to them.

Yes, but the BBC did not include a yes/no option poll.

Why not edit your poll choices from Yes/No to Good/Bad? That would then make perfect sense.

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Do you still beat your wife? Yes or no.

Need a third option for "no, she beats me".

BTW, I concede that the answer was totally wrong and I can't blame the BPC.

However, while it's fun day Friday and we are being pedantic

You said:

"The poll question is ambiguous."

But it was the poll answer that was bo-lax.

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

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It looks like i may be buying a large commercial property (fingers crossed as been looking for ages)

The rate rise would of course cost me but a small rate rise would let everyone know things can change as at the moment its just good for mega large companies who can issue bonds.

If you ask anyone who is negotiating a larger commercial property especially one with bank issues they just don't care about time.... you make an offer and then they get back to you weeks/months later and its always best and final offers etc etc.

The prices may have come down 40/60% but so have the incomes a rate rise will nudge them along and get some bargains and stock on the market.

This may also have the same impact with houses a .25 rate rise and the impression of more will make people think this is now the peak.....get selling

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It's a hypothetical question because rates are not going to rise. Why? You've got to realise a couple of things about the base rate. The BoE will tell you it's just a number that they come out with on a Wednesday once a month. So you think it does nothing? Well the one thing it is very closely connected to is the rate at which the government borrow money. They used to use "open market operations" to ensure that the government could borrow money at around the base rate. This involved the BoE printing money to buy government debt from the market which has the effect of reducing the interest on the deficit (new debt). But they want to borrow so much money at such a low interest rate they had to invent a new policy (QE) which allowed them to print ten's of billions to buy government debt from the market. This has allowed the government to have a massive deficit and borrow the money cheaply. There is no sign that the deficit is dropping and hence no sign that interest rates will be moving up any-time soon.

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