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Housenick

Anyone Managed To Sell A Flat With Poor Soundproofing?

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I wondered if anyone has managed to sell a flat with poor soundproofing?

How do estate agents deal with this? Do they tell buyers older properties have poor sound proofing and you may well hear walking and talking? or do they pretend there is no issue and try and get veiwings in the day when they know the people above will be out?

I know a lot of London flats are conversions and have awful noise problems from everyday living sounds. (two of my friends own flats like this) but they seem to sell at very high prices and at the moment many are going above asking price.

So has anyone managed to sell a flat with noise issues without knocking money off? does it just come down to viewings happening when the neighbours are out?

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Hi Housenick

I can empathise with you as noisy neighbours can drive you insane.

Try not to annoy them as they will go out of their way to make it worse if they know it grates on you. When it comes to selling, make sure that the property is "dressed to sell" as many potential buyers will be cooing over it if all they have seen is crappy properties. Put your tv/hifi on with some subtle background music to drown any background noise, but not to loud to have the neighbours banging on the ceiling. All you need is one buyer to fall in love with it and they willl be blinkered and buy it .

Good luck

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We had this, but the neighbour was quite reasonable about it. He was noisy when he was in, he just couldn't help himself but he was a lovely fellow.

We simply:

1. Had a nice low asking price (made a £15k loss on a £90k purchase price after eight years)

2. Told him when our viewings were. He went out for the hour!

Simples.

(I hear now that HE's now annoyed by our purchasers noise after we sold! Works both ways it appears!)

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Cheers the advice. The people above us our nice too but they are Italian and always in so it's just constant walking and talking noise, not really there fault. We could ask them to go out during a viewing and slip them £20 but worried about come back if we did that. Why did you discount the property if he went out during the viewings? We were unlucky when viewing as neighbours were away for the week, viewed 3 times. Estate agent lied said they had never heard a thing.

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Presumably going for viewings when the neighbours are out during the day would help? I notice you single out older properties but I live in a modern block and I can hear doors closing, the lift, people having a slash, toilets flushing, etc, etc.

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2. Told him when our viewings were. He went out for the hour!

Back handers might work but it doesn'thelp if you're sandwiched between two properties. I live in an old 1950s gerry build block of flats and I can hear four different neighbours.

I even get woken up by the couple upstairs shagging and can hear them take a piss and a dump on the toilet.

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Yes, I imagine this post applies to pretty much all new-build flats!!

In general, it doesn't. The building regulations were severely tightened in about 2000, and extreme sound insulation between flats is a legal requirement. Certainly when I lived in a new build (2003) flat, you could put the washing on spin-dry at 3 am, and you wouldn't hear a thing in the next flat, or in the corridors. Even student parties caused surprisingly little noise in neighbouring flats.

The big problem is conversions; while in new builds, the architects will have to produce buildings regs compliant designs (e.g. solid concrete separating walls between flats), in conversions, there is quite a lot more flexibility in interpretation. Technically, the same regulations for noise insulation apply; in practice, they are poorly enforced.

Beware of victorian houses converted to flats. These typically have very poor sound insulation, as the proper insulation required may not have been installed correctly, or may have been designed incorrectly. This type of property is the one, even in new conversions, which have the proverbial paper walls and paper ceilings.

Edited by ChumpusRex

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