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http://news.sky.com/story/1253573/four-million-households-owe-energy-supplier

"Four Million Households Owe Energy Supplier

Homeowners owe an average of £128 on their bills as they struggle to cope with price hikes of almost £800 in the last 10 years."

Nothing to see here, move along.

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I'm not sure those figures are even valid. We owe a bit more than that at the moment because we split what we spend through the year into equal monthly payments (so by the end of winter we owe them, by the beginning of the next winter they owe us).

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My wife just started working for the water board, she was telling me about the size and number of arrears. There are many people who owe a couple of years worth on their water bills.

She was digging around streets we are familiar with looking at the arrears and in many cases these people have cars that are under 3 years old and have recently had attic conversions etc. The car's, loft convesions etc. are bought with debt, but the water bill has to be paid from income.

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I'm not sure those figures are even valid. We owe a bit more than that at the moment because we split what we spend through the year into equal monthly payments (so by the end of winter we owe them, by the beginning of the next winter they owe us).

Then you have got a very fair energy supplier. Hell would freeze over before they would allow us to be in debit. They usually look at what we use then decide to be on the safe side to double it when calculating the DD. Yep I get it reduced, but I am still always in massive credit by the year end, they are complete c%*ts when it comes to fairness.

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My wife just started working for the water board, she was telling me about the size and number of arrears. There are many people who owe a couple of years worth on their water bills.

She was digging around streets we are familiar with looking at the arrears and in many cases these people have cars that are under 3 years old and have recently had attic conversions etc. The car's, loft convesions etc. are bought with debt, but the water bill has to be paid from income.

Also, new cars and even 'home improvements' make people happy through having a higher status (they believe).

Idiots.

Debt is evil, keeping up with the neighbours is stupid.

I believe that you can't be cut off or have water reduced due to arrears. How else do water companies get their money?

People living in houses they can't afford due to me subsidising their low interest rates.

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How many owe but can't pay? That's the real quesiton.

How many dont owe and can't pay is a better question !!!

Wonga living.

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

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I believe that you can't be cut off or have water reduced due to arrears. How else do water companies get their money?

Watching Watermen: A Dirty Business on BBC2 on Tuesday they said that a percentage is added to the bills of those who do pay to cover those who can't/won't.

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Then you have got a very fair energy supplier. Hell would freeze over before they would allow us to be in debit. They usually look at what we use then decide to be on the safe side to double it when calculating the DD. Yep I get it reduced, but I am still always in massive credit by the year end, they are complete c%*ts when it comes to fairness.

Yes -

My last bill was along the lines of:

- Estimated annual bill: £950

- Current direct debit: £81 (12x81 = £972 last time I looked..)

- Current balance + £200.

At which point their computer decided that we needed to hike the direct debit to £120 or thereabouts.

I would like to see the algorithm. I think I could devise a more accurate one..

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Yes -

My last bill was along the lines of:

- Estimated annual bill: £950

- Current direct debit: £81 (12x81 = £972 last time I looked..)

- Current balance + £200.

At which point their computer decided that we needed to hike the direct debit to £120 or thereabouts.

I would like to see the algorithm. I think I could devise a more accurate one..

Of course that would depend on what there algorithm is trying to accomplish. Which is probably profits for the energy company.

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Then you have got a very fair energy supplier. Hell would freeze over before they would allow us to be in debit. They usually look at what we use then decide to be on the safe side to double it when calculating the DD. Yep I get it reduced, but I am still always in massive credit by the year end, they are complete c%*ts when it comes to fairness.

For the first few years, when they wanted to put the DD up to something silly at the end of the winter, I just rang them up and explained what my energy use pattern was (ie. we're on electric-only), and negotiated a sensible mid-level payment. In addition, I'm fairly sure I read something which stated you're allowed to do that anyway now, because using a lot more energy in the winter is a given.

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