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Friday night in the local. Act on the last time they where here the pub was rammed. Tonite busy buy you can easily get to the bar.

The pub is dying.

Alcohol is over priced and many young people cant afford and cant bothered to go down the local.

Perhaps xbox gaming nites would help?

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Its been a long time trend. Town i grew up in (newmarket, suffolk) used to sport two, large, popular night clubs in the late 90s, early 00s. Both were always busy on thurs/sat nights and did reasonable trade on fridays back then. One closed down in the mid 00s. Shut for a few years, remaining nightclub continued and was still busy on thurs/sat till the late 00s. The other one re-opened just before the credit crunch (when else) and was dead for a few years. Dunno how they stayed open, but theyre still open now. Usually very quiet but for one night a month. Other one still open, downsized, and usually near empty. One will surely shut down soon. Town cant support two near empty clubs.

Pubs less busy too. One turned into thai restaurant or somesuch.

Same in all the other local towns, so its not like one just fell out of favour and everyones going somewhere else. Thursdays (students night) seems worst effected. Not sure why any clubs bother to open on thursdays anymore. Certainly seemed to initially slow down around 2007/8, but rather than picking up with the so called recovery, just seems to keep getting quieter.

Even Cambridge itself seems to only really be busy on saturday nights anymore. Back in 05/06/07 you could go in most weeknights and the streets would be full of drunk students. No more.

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Entertainment and Booze are so cheap at home now that the pubs just can't compete. I can't see that they will ever be able to again.

Why would I go into town and pay £3.50 or even £4 for a pint of cider when I can get the exact same brand from the supermarket at less than a £1 a pint, and not have to worry about designated drivers or crap music? Can invite mates round to play on the PS3 or for a meal or to watch a film on a big TV (better than the cinema because people aren't chatting and using their phone, and we can eat and drink what we like).

Even the films that would once have been a £3 hire from blockbuster are now £6 a month for unlimited films and TV from netflix and music from Spotify.

(In case you hadn't guessed, I don't get out much, nor do I want to!)

I can have 3 mates round for a film night (even if we rent a recent release via blinkbox), give them 4 pints each and have change from £20.

If we went to the cinema and then to the pub we'd be looking at at about £25 EACH!

Edited by Bear Necessities

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Entertainment and Booze are so cheap at home now that the pubs just can't compete. I can't see that they will ever be able to again.

Why would I go into town and pay £3.50 or even £4 for a pint of cider when I can get the exact same brand from the supermarket at less than a £1 a pint, and not have to worry about designated drivers or crap music? Can invite mates round to play on the PS3 or for a meal or to watch a film on a big TV (better than the cinema because people aren't chatting and using their phone, and we can eat and drink what we like).

Even the films that would once have been a £3 hire from blockbuster are now £6 a month for unlimited films and TV from netflix and music from Spotify.

(In case you hadn't guessed, I don't get out much, nor do I want to!)

I can have 3 mates round for a film night (even if we rent a recent release via blinkbox), give them 4 pints each and have change from £20.

If we went to the cinema and then to the pub we'd be looking at at about £25 EACH!

How about for meeting the opposite sex.....if that's your thing of course? :unsure:

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How about for meeting the opposite sex.....if that's your thing of course? :unsure:

He's right on a number of things. A good friend is a surveyor in the pub trade and he's called the crisis in the pub trade for a long time.

His view is/was that post 2006/7,younger generations have gradually got used to socialising away from pubs for reasons mainly of cost.Also,he says that the increasing social acceptability of internet dating has reinforced that trend further.Back in the 00's noone did it.Now every does.

The pub trade and the govt took their customers for granted.

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Entertainment and Booze are so cheap at home now that the pubs just can't compete. I can't see that they will ever be able to again.

Why would I go into town and pay £3.50 or even £4 for a pint of cider when I can get the exact same brand from the supermarket at less than a £1 a pint, and not have to worry about designated drivers or crap music? Can invite mates round to play on the PS3 or for a meal or to watch a film on a big TV (better than the cinema because people aren't chatting and using their phone, and we can eat and drink what we like).

Even the films that would once have been a £3 hire from blockbuster are now £6 a month for unlimited films and TV from netflix and music from Spotify.

(In case you hadn't guessed, I don't get out much, nor do I want to!)

I can have 3 mates round for a film night (even if we rent a recent release via blinkbox), give them 4 pints each and have change from £20.

If we went to the cinema and then to the pub we'd be looking at at about £25 EACH!

Absolutely.I can think of loads of village pubs that are no more and the amount of pubs relying on the sat night trade is probably at a record high in terms of proportion.

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Absolutely.I can think of loads of village pubs that are no more and the amount of pubs relying on the sat night trade is probably at a record high in terms of proportion.

I stayed in a village in the Peak District at the end of last year. It's typical population was about 90, but had a roaring trade with the ramblers...

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I stayed in a village in the Peak District at the end of last year. It's typical population was about 90, but had a roaring trade with the ramblers...

You get a lot of pubs like that in central birmingham too.

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Its been a long time trend. Town i grew up in (newmarket, suffolk) used to sport two, large, popular night clubs in the late 90s, early 00s. Both were always busy on thurs/sat nights and did reasonable trade on fridays back then.

De Niro's - everyone I know of roughly 30-40 who grew up around Cambridge talks of De Niro's.

Even Cambridge itself seems to only really be busy on saturday nights anymore. Back in 05/06/07 you could go in most weeknights and the streets would be full of drunk students. No more.

Certainly true of the strip of pubs around Revolution/Wetherspoons but the Mill Road pubs seem to be packed whenever I go there.

I think I read generally that people in their late teens and twenties don't pub/club in the same way people did in the 1990/00 era. And given a pint in somewhere like the "Pint Shop" in Cambridge starts at about £3.90 I can see why. When I was a student in the end of the 1990s I paid about £1.50, rent was £36 a week and no tuition fees. More like £4, £100 a week and £9k a year now.

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Im late 30s and i relate pubs at the weekends with a good chance of getting into a fight as this is how it was when i were a lad, thus i rarely go now as im wanting a quiet life.

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Friday night in the local. Act on the last time they where here the pub was rammed. Tonite busy buy you can easily get to the bar.

The pub is dying.

Alcohol is over priced and many young people cant afford and cant bothered to go down the local.

Perhaps xbox gaming nites would help?

well funny you should say that, theres one or two old places in amsterdams rather less saloubrious districts that have been turned into "barcades"

...that being boozer with lots of retro game machines(like pac man, defender, galaxia etc)..and these apparently are rather popular.

so it doesn't just have to be a choice between weatherspoons or sit&sawdust on the corner.

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And to get back on-topic: let's not forget that all too often, the land that the pub sits on is worth more than the business itself. So it can be very tempting to deliberately to run the pub into the ground, then appeal to the council to be allowed to convert it into flats/houses.

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Pubs getting what they deserve IMHO. As a pretty accurate guide a small glass of wine in a pub costs the same price as a bottle of exactly the same thing in a supermarket. Beer, well a pretty similar markup.

I understand that the pubs have overheads, but at those prices they can go swivel. Local shops on the other hand, well I'll support them all day long. A book or some decent food might cost a bit more, but I have no objection to that.

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And to get back on-topic: let's not forget that all too often, the land that the pub sits on is worth more than the business itself. So it can be very tempting to deliberately to run the pub into the ground, then appeal to the council to be allowed to convert it into flats/houses.

There's another way this has happened for town centre venues.

The 1989 'beer orders' made it profitable to break up traditional breweries. A lot a lot of the bigger high street venues/brands ended up in 'pub companies'. These were asset stripped by selling the physical property on a 'lease back' deal, and then sold on or floated with the same cash flow but no assets. Each individual business unit then has to sink or swim year to year based on profitability. Investment for regular refurbishment becomes critical and any downturn risks closure.

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These days there seems to be a lot of businesses where the staff just seem to sit around all day trying to look occupied - not busy but occupied.

I dare say if the business owner owns the property then they can afford to have the staff effectively doing nothing if the asset value is going up quickly. They might reckon that keeping the place looking like a proper business keeps the asset value up - and any losses can be put against tax etc and one day who knows but they might even turn a profit.

Eventually they might be able to sell onto to a developer to build some flats to help to accommodate the increasing population and settlers that come to take up "jobs".

Edited by billybong

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Pubs either need to become part of a corporate chain or need a small but fanatical die hard customer base, or they'll die in recent years.

Exact opposite IMO, the successful ones are all free houses who can buy whatever beer they like and sell it at reasonable prices.

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Good pubs in sensible locations continue to prosper. But they've got a lot more competition than a generation ago, not least with the rise and rise of coffee shops.

There are a lot of indifferent and bad pubs around. Some of them are people who made their fortune then went to 'live the dream' of running a pub, only to find they aren't very good at it. Others may be old-timers who haven't changed with the times. Many are indeed also big chain pubs, with a pub manager who is an employee and doesn't really care.

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Freehold pubs can do very well in certain places, good choice of real beer and good reasonably priced food both for lunch time and evening customers, maybe a good sunday lunch or carvery......lots of additional community activites such as local bands, nice garden, that welcome dogs and bikers. Maybe some space for camping/parking stopover with electric provided.

A pub is just a home with a public room.....tenanted pubs are hard to make money, the companies that own them are often highly leaveraged, high tunover of staff who rarely have a stake in the business, rubbish expensive beers they are forced to sell.......only there to keep the people who are not doing any work making money.......the difference between the two is vast. ;)

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And to get back on-topic: let's not forget that all too often, the land that the pub sits on is worth more than the business itself. So it can be very tempting to deliberately to run the pub into the ground, then appeal to the council to be allowed to convert it into flats/houses.

This is a well-known strategy, although the corporate pub chains deny this. It is very difficult to compete with residential property prices - they have doubled or tripled since 2000 in many places, whereas pub profits have remained static at best.

It is not just failing pubs that have closed, but highly successful ones, which unfortunately could not meet the landlord's greed when a big cheque is waived in front of his face. This is particularly acute in London.

Pubs which have flourished are freeholds that are able to buy their own beer at their own prices and do not have to worry about a brewer's debts or rising property values. Those closing are often neighbourhood pubs, owned by breweries that have a largely wet income (i.e. alcohol) with little dry (food). Those that have built a balanced wet/dry income have done well, as long as the freehold owner does not flog it off.

The cigarette ban has not helped some pubs, but does not appear to have killed them off.

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Its been a long time trend. Town i grew up in (newmarket, suffolk) used to sport two, large, popular night clubs in the late 90s, early 00s. Both were always busy on thurs/sat nights and did reasonable trade on fridays back then.

De Niro's - everyone I know of roughly 30-40 who grew up around Cambridge talks of De Niro's.

Even Cambridge itself seems to only really be busy on saturday nights anymore. Back in 05/06/07 you could go in most weeknights and the streets would be full of drunk students. No more.

Certainly true of the strip of pubs around Revolution/Wetherspoons but the Mill Road pubs seem to be packed whenever I go there.

I think I read generally that people in their late teens and twenties don't pub/club in the same way people did in the 1990/00 era. And given a pint in somewhere like the "Pint Shop" in Cambridge starts at about £3.90 I can see why. When I was a student in the end of the 1990s I paid about £1.50, rent was £36 a week and no tuition fees. More like £4, £100 a week and £9k a year now.

Yes, back in the 90s/ early 00s they used to run buses for students to get from cambridge to newmarket as despite being about 10 tens bigger, Cambridge was not known for its nightlife whereas for a small town Newmarket had quite good nightlife. Doubt anyone from Cambridge bothers to go to Newmarket now. Newmarket has gone downhill more than any of the Cambridge commuter towns IMO, not helped by the rabid NIMBY movement there. Im in St Neots now, which isnt too bad. Always disliked Huntingdon, but I think Newmarket may be worse. Think the original owners since of deniros since 1986 got out in 2007 and some other guy moved in, tried to make a go of it but has been downsizing it ever since. Ive seldom gone to Newmarket in the past few years, but the clubs there always look empty. Cant be long now till one shuts down .

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