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Amazon Offers Employees $5,000 To Quit

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http://money.cnn.com/2014/04/11/technology/amazon-pay-to-quit/

Amazon is offering its warehouse employees up to $5,000 to quit their jobs, even as the company is in the process of adding workers and locations.

The "Pay to Quit" program, which was announced by CEO Jeff Bezos in his letter to shareholders late Thursday, is an effort to make sure that the Internet retailer's employees really want to be there.

"The goal is to encourage folks to take a moment and think about what they really want," he wrote in the letter. "In the long-run, an employee staying somewhere they don't want to be isn't healthy for the employee or the company."

Bezos said the offer is made under the headline "Please Don't Take This Offer." Amazon will offer to pay its associates to quit once a year.

The company has experimented with this program in recent years, but rolled it out to its 40,000 warehouse employees in January, according to a company spokeswoman.

Newer employees are offered $2,000 to quit. The plan is to increase that offer by $1,000 each year until the amount hits $5,000.

Perhaps improving working conditions for your workers might make more sense so they don't want to quit?

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Actually, this seems like a pretty good idea to me, but I might be missing something.

The anti-bonus?

I suppose it's based on nudge theory - probably to nudge out anyone tempted to join the union they defeated a few months ago.

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The anti-bonus?

I suppose it's based on nudge theory - probably to nudge out anyone tempted to join the union they defeated a few months ago.

Well, if you start from the basic assumption that those who would take up the offer don't like their jobs, then it strikes me as a modern solution to worker-relations. The company gains because people who don't like their jobs tend not to give the best value (i.e. they're bored and sh1t), the individual quitting employee gains because he gets a chance to go "well, some rent/mortgage/food is covered - I can take the time to find I job a like", and society gains because if Amazon isn't a good enough employer, they'll lose everybody with this offer, thus encouraging fair pay and conditions.

If every company did this, what would be the downside? Especially as future employers would get pretty good at reading CVs to determine who were the habitual quitters...*

* this might look like a downside, but if there are too many habitual quitters (i.e. all employers = sh1t) then the signal is no help, and if a particular company had an excess of quitters compared to other companies, that would be a pretty good signal to avoid/ignore that company rather than blame the quitter.

Edited by tomandlu

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Well, if you start from the basic assumption that those who would take up the offer don't like their jobs, then it strikes me as a modern solution to worker-relations. The company gains because people who don't like their jobs tend not to give the best value (i.e. they're bored and sh1t), the individual quitting employee gains because he gets a chance to go "well, some rent/mortgage/food is covered - I can take the time to find I job a like", and society gains because if Amazon isn't a good enough employer, they'll lose everybody with this offer, thus encouraging fair pay and conditions.

In the UK you'd better make sure you tell them not to give you too much, or you would lose eligibility for out-of-work benefits!

Edited by Smyth

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In the UK you'd better make sure you tell them not to give you too much, or you would lose eligibility for out-of-work benefits!

A voluntary quit means no benefits anyway.

Think of it as a moving to next job bonus.

Perversely, as the quit incentive grows by $1,000 per year it is also a retention incentive - a little growing pot of money.

Edited by Nationalist

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In the UK you'd better make sure you tell them not to give you too much, or you would lose eligibility for out-of-work benefits!

That's if you are entitled to any. A lot of your posts seem to state everybody on low wages get them I'm not entitled to any benefits although I have paid tax and NI for 35 years. That includes JSA if I lost my job.

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one of my old college mates worked from amazon in swansea. apparently they are awful to work. you are lucky if you last 6 months.

he also things half of swansea have worked there and been sacked in the last 10 years and now they have to ship in recruits from elsewhere as locals wont work for them.

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A voluntary quit means no benefits anyway.

Think of it as a moving to next job bonus.

Perversely, as the quit incentive grows by $1,000 per year it is also a retention incentive - a little growing pot of money.

I volutarily quit on 31st jan this year i took £25,065 as a payoff i then presented myself at the local jobcentre declared what happened and provided written proof which stated the ammount of money i got and..........iam now recieving jobseekers allowance for up to 26 weeks whilst i look for a new job

my place of work was closing down though

Edited by workingpoor

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That's if you are entitled to any. A lot of your posts seem to state everybody on low wages get them I'm not entitled to any benefits although I have paid tax and NI for 35 years. That includes JSA if I lost my job.

Wrong. If as you say you have paid full NI for the 2years preceeding your job loss you will qualify for (non means tested) contribution based JSA

Edited by workingpoor

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Wrong. If as you say you have paid full NI for the 2years preceeding your job loss you will qualify for (non means tested) contribution based JSA

For six months, I think. That is, assuming that herself works.

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Wrong. If as you say you have paid full NI for the 2years preceeding your job loss you will qualify for (non means tested) contribution based JSA

Mortgage £418 a month

Council tax £100 a month

Pension £ 550 a month

No benefits what so ever.

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Mortgage £418 a month

Council tax £100 a month

Pension £ 550 a month

No benefits what so ever.

Ah.... its your pension income which will stop you.

Edited by workingpoor

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I volutarily quit on 31st jan this year i took £25,065 as a payoff i then presented myself at the local jobcentre declared what happened and provided written proof which stated the ammount of money i got and..........iam now recieving jobseekers allowance for up to 26 weeks whilst i look for a new job

my place of work was closing down though

Not bad, I got half a year's salary when I got made redundant even though the firm only had to pay me a month legally. Actually they put me on gardening leave for 6 months as this worked out better for me wrt to my pension. I'm now getting 55% of my final salary for up to 24 months while I look for a job, which is nice.

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