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Dave Beans

Britpop @ The Bbc On Bbc4

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I forgot how much a lot of it was completely derivative...

Happy memories of a time long, long ago but not much of it stands the test of time, Pulp aside.

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Happy memories of a time long, long ago but not much of it stands the test of time, Pulp aside.

I think Suede's "Coming Up" still holds its own..

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Happy memories of a time long, long ago but not much of it stands the test of time, Pulp aside.

Amen to that brother - the 'weed in Tweed' is the only real talent on display.

XYY

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I think Suede's "Coming Up" still holds its own..

Definitely one of the better ones. Will be seeing them in a couple of months. Quite looking forward to it.

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Amen to that brother - the 'weed in Tweed' is the only real talent on display.

XYY

The Madchester scene in the early 90s pretty much nailed it, but what followed didn't really match up. Oasis Quo really get on my t1ts.

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I forgot how much a lot of it was completely derivative...

Isn't almost everything derivative, though?

You reach an age where almost every song you hear sounds like something else.

Bearing in mind that I'm 41 now (birthday just gone) and I never really did hear much of The Beatles - not my era. So, to me, Oasis was "new".

These two still spring to mind as little bits of genius:

James - Sit Down (edit: this could be the official HPC tune)

Waterboys - Whole of the Moon

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Waterboys - Whole of the Moon

The backing vocals towards the end sound so much like Bowie. Officially they definitely aren't, but I'm not so sure.

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Isn't almost everything derivative, though?

You reach an age where almost every song you hear sounds like something else.

Bearing in mind that I'm 41 now (birthday just gone) and I never really did hear much of The Beatles - not my era. So, to me, Oasis was "new".

Although during, probably between 94 and 97, (and much like any short-lived scene), a number of bands piled in for their 5 minutes and made quick dosh. Of course those who had (and have real talent) outlasted it, and developed their sound..

Blur are an odd one - I rather like Leisure - its quite shoegazey at times - then the Parklife scene happened, with all that Mockney bravado, which I'm not a fan of, then they brought out Blur - Blur, which is actually quite dark..Since, they've been very hit & miss.

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Happy memories of a time long, long ago but not much of it stands the test of time, Pulp aside.

For the sake of convenience and for our younger members (makes me feel soooo old)

Pulp - Common People

Pulp - Disco 2000 (Motiv8 Remix)

I like dance music. Regular contributors might have noticed this. See what I did there ;)

Edit to add: oh, that's soooo good.

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Interview with pop historian on BBC yesterday, What was Britpop? Ummm. But what was it really all about? Ummm. Conclusion: marketing ploy.

UK music was excellent, and nobody can explain why it isn't anymore. Still, at least there's ... folk music, which the BBC has been promoting.

Arena did this - Amy Winehouse in Dingle:

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The backing vocals towards the end sound so much like Bowie. Officially they definitely aren't, but I'm not so sure.

Never noticed that before. I see what you mean.

George Michael - Jive Talkin'.

'Nuff said ;)

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Interview with pop historian on BBC yesterday, What was Britpop? Ummm. But what was it really all about? Ummm. Conclusion: marketing ploy.

UK music was excellent, and nobody can explain why it isn't anymore. Still, at least there's ... folk music, which the BBC has been promoting.

Watching a documentary about disco over Christmas - the subject of which came up in a thread on here - Stock, Aitken and Waterman went for a specific sound which was hugely popular and populist. A "marketing ploy" indeed. Or, maybe they just liked that sound.

I liked it, and so did so many others.

Marketing ploy - maybe. Doesn't alter the fact that it made lots of people happy. Briefly.

I don't imagine quite so many people will be humming along to The Reynolds Girls' "I'd Rather Jack" in twenty years as, say, Oasis's "Wonderwall".

But then this is surely true for every genre. "Pop" music = popular at the time. So little endures. And though "Britpop" wasn't "my" genre, I can easily pick out half a dozen really memorable tunes. Plagiarism? Maybe. But if I recall the "modern copy" that's worth something in itself.

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Watching a documentary about disco over Christmas - the subject of which came up in a thread on here - Stock, Aitken and Waterman went for a specific sound which was hugely popular and populist. A "marketing ploy" indeed. Or, maybe they just liked that sound.

I liked it, and so did so many others.

Marketing ploy - maybe. Doesn't alter the fact that it made lots of people happy. Briefly.

I don't imagine quite so many people will be humming along to The Reynolds Girls' "I'd Rather Jack" in twenty years as, say, Oasis's "Wonderwall".

But then this is surely true for every genre. "Pop" music = popular at the time. So little endures. And though "Britpop" wasn't "my" genre, I can easily pick out half a dozen really memorable tunes. Plagiarism? Maybe. But if I recall the "modern copy" that's worth something in itself.

It all survives. On Youtube.

"I remember your Nan and me kickin' it in t'90s, when houses were cheap ... Sorry there's nothing left in the will."

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Oasis made it big when I was 16. Bought an 'Oasis' T-shirt and first two albums on CD. However, a fortnight after 'What's the Story Morning Glory' came out, Chicago's Smashing Pumpkins third album 'Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness' was released and I listened to that album a lot.B) I went off Oasis a bit after that.

I really like Pulp from that era too. Their 1998 album 'This is Hardcore' is a good listen with tracks like 'Seductive Barry' - Neneh Cherry on backing vocals.

In 1999/2000 I was struggling with the music scene. Went onto older bands like Led Zep and Pink Floyd. When I bought 'Dark Side of the Moon' , then began a 14 year (and counting) love affair with 1970s progressive rock. :blink::D

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Oasis made it big when I was 16. Bought an 'Oasis' T-shirt and first two albums on CD. However, a fortnight after 'What's the Story Morning Glory' came out, Chicago's Smashing Pumpkins third album 'Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness' was released and I listened to that album a lot.B) I went off Oasis a bit after that.

I really like Pulp from that era too. Their 1998 album 'This is Hardcore' is a good listen with tracks like 'Seductive Barry' - Neneh Cherry on backing vocals.

In 1999/2000 I was struggling with the music scene. Went onto older bands like Led Zep and Pink Floyd. When I bought 'Dark Side of the Moon' , then began a 14 year (and counting) love affair with 1970s progressive rock. :blink::D

I've always thought that TiH has been a vastly underrated album.

Britpop is really the last biggest guitar-based pop movement. Its probably after this, is when technology in music really came to the fore...be it sampling, or whatever. I remember a friend of mine buying a hardware sampler for 500 quid back in around '96...Now you can get free software to do the same thing, that does it twenty times better..

After Britpop / Cool Britannia - Garage, and all the dross that brought.

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I think Suede's "Coming Up" still holds its own..

Have recorded the show, didn`t like Britpop at the time (My formative musical era was Early 80`s Heavy Metal) although Pulp stood out as good as did Suede. Wasn`t it Elastica who were sued multiple times for plagiarism by some American band that`s name eludes me at the moment? I know it is a slightly earlier era, but The Stone Roses struck me as completely derivative at the time as well. The 70`s bands were as well of course, but their sources might not have been so obvious to the general listener? I think Britpop was the media`s last Great Hurrah at creating a youth "movement", and the last youth movement that was even remotely threatening to the PTB was probably punk (or maybe the mid 80`s rave scene?, Battle of the Beanfield and all that?)

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Isn't almost everything derivative, though?

You reach an age where almost every song you hear sounds like something else.

Bearing in mind that I'm 41 now (birthday just gone) and I never really did hear much of The Beatles - not my era. So, to me, Oasis was "new".

These two still spring to mind as little bits of genius:

James - Sit Down (edit: this could be the official HPC tune)

Waterboys - Whole of the Moon

Shouldn`t your formative musical years be about 1985,86, 87? Which if you listen back contained a lot of good stuff, along with of course complete dross (even Kylie was producing decent tunes back then though) I would have thought that after hearing Tears for Fears. Level 42, Terence Trent D`Arby, Talking Heads etc. in the charts Oasis would have just sounded like the pub band derivative noise that they are? (Although to be fair Oasis have their moments, Live Forever is a great song)

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Wasn`t it Elastica who were sued multiple times for plagiarism by some American band that`s name eludes me at the moment?

I think Elastica were sued by the Stranglers. The guitar riff used in 'Waking Up was very similar to the one in 'No More Heroes'. :)

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Have recorded the show, didn`t like Britpop at the time (My formative musical era was Early 80`s Heavy Metal) although Pulp stood out as good as did Suede. Wasn`t it Elastica who were sued multiple times for plagiarism by some American band that`s name eludes me at the moment? I know it is a slightly earlier era, but The Stone Roses struck me as completely derivative at the time as well. The 70`s bands were as well of course, but their sources might not have been so obvious to the general listener? I think Britpop was the media`s last Great Hurrah at creating a youth "movement", and the last youth movement that was even remotely threatening to the PTB was probably punk (or maybe the mid 80`s rave scene?, Battle of the Beanfield and all that?)

Wire?

Pretty blatant.

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Wire?

Pretty blatant.

I think Damon Albarn must have had a good listen to that second song "Fly In the Ointment" as well? His whole act seems based on it. Putting it in perspective Elastica were just three half decent looking birds jumping up and down with guitars, and some bloke. Saw them supporting the Fall in Edinburgh, late 90`s, think it was a "surprise comeback" gig for Elastica, the Fall fans more or less booed them off at the end to get Mark E Smith on, and he came on looking like a cross between a Big Issue seller and a bin man, cursing and swearing and kicking his guitarist up the **** at one point. He must pay them well to keep his teeth in place I suppose? Must say the dark haired girl from Elastica looked pretty good from five feet away, much better than some of her photos where she is a bit rough, maybe she had cleaned up her (drug) act by the late 90`s.

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I think Damon Albarn must have had a good listen to that second song "Fly In the Ointment" as well? His whole act seems based on it. Putting it in perspective Elastica were just three half decent looking birds jumping up and down with guitars, and some bloke. Saw them supporting the Fall in Edinburgh, late 90`s, think it was a "surprise comeback" gig for Elastica, the Fall fans more or less booed them off at the end to get Mark E Smith on, and he came on looking like a cross between a Big Issue seller and a bin man, cursing and swearing and kicking his guitarist up the **** at one point. He must pay them well to keep his teeth in place I suppose? Must say the dark haired girl from Elastica looked pretty good from five feet away, much better than some of her photos where she is a bit rough, maybe she had cleaned up her (drug) act by the late 90`s.

Watching some old clips I'm struck by how much Sheryl Sandberg looks like her.

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