Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

snowflux

Sony Entertainment Network

Recommended Posts

A few days ago I decided to sit down and watch a film with my lad on his PS3. The Sony Entertainment Network server assured me that my cable connection was plenty fast enough for HD, so I paid my £4.49 to rent the film and started watching.

After half and hour or so, the streaming stopped, reporting that my downstream speed wasn't fast enough to keep up. Oh well, I thought, I'll download the film and we'll watch another time. That took a couple of hours, finishing only when my lad was in bed. Never mind, thinks I, we'll watch it another time.

So tonight we decided to watch the rest of the film, found the film download and hit play. No joy. Apparently the license has now expired, even though we were unable to watch the film to the end. So, gritting my teeth, I pay another £4.49 for another licence to watch. So far so good until, after another half hour or so, the film suddenly stops, reporting that the film data is corrupted. And there seems to be no way of downloading it again without paying another £4.49, and even then no guarantee of it working.

What to do? Anyone else have any experience of this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't you need a TV the size of a house before you notice HD? They used to have a couple of (probably around 40") TVs set up in the electro shop so you could compare them, but I could never tell the difference, and they took them down after a while, so I presumed no one else could either. Don't know anything about sony, but I can never watch any internet videos live anyway.

edit: just remembered, it's the action scenes that come up better, isn't it? I think i might have asked that question before.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

snowflux, your experience is a great example why most people prefer to download movies from 'unofficial' sites.

I would never pay for streaming (and £4.49?? That's the price of a DVD!), I either buy the DVD or Bluray (if I think the movie is worth it) or I download the movie from an 'unofficial' site.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

snowflux, your experience is a great example why most people prefer to download movies from 'unofficial' sites.

I would never pay for streaming (and £4.49?? That's the price of a DVD!), I either buy the DVD or Bluray (if I think the movie is worth it) or I download the movie from an 'unofficial' site.

I'm not 18 any more, and have no objection to paying a reasonable amount of cash to recompense the artists involved for their efforts; nor am I keen to take the risks involved with illegal downloading. However, I am also not interested in buying a library of films since I generally only ever watch them once. I just want to rent a film now and again, and now that Blockbusters has expired, using my lad's PS3 to download them from Sony seems the obvious way to go. If the technology worked, I'd be happy to use it! My question is: does the technology work for other people?

BTW, the DVD of the film in question (Hunger Games, Catching Fire) costs £9.99 from Amazon; £12.99 on Blu-ray.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

snowflux, your experience is a great example why most people prefer to download movies from 'unofficial' sites.

I would never pay for streaming (and £4.49?? That's the price of a DVD!), I either buy the DVD or Bluray (if I think the movie is worth it) or I download the movie from an 'unofficial' site.

I think that the Oatmeal's take on illegal downloads is very accurate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your general question is whether it is possible to hire a film or whatever and watch it on technology via your broadband connection, in general, I would say 'yes'.

I have rented films from netflix, BT Vision and Sky Now TV (£9.99 for the box) in this manner and they all work...watched on my TV. Strangely I have also now got a Chromecast (£30 for the dongle) and that works really well too for beaming youtube onto my TV. Have just watched the original House of Cards and Bronowski's ascent of man in this way.

And I don't have a massively fast connection. c.2.7mb.

My connection's Virgin cable 20mb, so should be plenty fast enough. The possible reasons for problems I can think of are:

1) Virgin throttling back the speed after a while.

2) Router not coping.

3) PS3 software a bit crap.

4) I've just been unlucky.

It is still crap that it appears to be impossible to repeat the download attempt without having to pay again though. I don't really want to go the Netflix subscription route because I only want to watch occasional films.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My connection's Virgin cable 20mb, so should be plenty fast enough. The possible reasons for problems I can think of are:

1) Virgin throttling back the speed after a while.

Yes that should be ample. I have virgin broadband and have never had that kind of issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I doubt it. I suspect that most people downloading illegally, like The Eagle, don't bother trying all the legitimate options beforehand. Also, the fact that some item it not legitimately available to buy is not, in itself, justification for stealing it.

Police crack down on Game of Thrones illegal downloads

The level of piracy may be linked to the fact that the TV company behind it - HBO - does not allow Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime or other US streaming services access to its programmes.

It instead restricts them to its own HBO Go online product, which is only available to its cable subscribers.

What about the argument that shows like Game of Thrones are difficult to get hold of digitally legally?

Newsbeat put that question to Sky Atlantic, which holds the broadcast rights of Game of Thrones in the UK. They refused to answer. The questions they did answer are below.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had trouble with the ps3 on wifi. Plugged into the router it's fine. I moved it into a different room to the router and had to get some gadget to send the internet over my electrical wiring to get it to work properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had trouble with the ps3 on wifi. Plugged into the router it's fine. I moved it into a different room to the router and had to get some gadget to send the internet over my electrical wiring to get it to work properly.

Thanks, that's interesting. That could be the problem. It's still a bit crap that the Sony software doesn't actually validate the download though, and also won't let you download again unless you pay again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's no single definition of what constitutes "HD": can require a consistent streaming of speed of anything from about 5Mbps (YouTube) up to 10Mbps (Netflix, and only then on selected titles). I've also seen "very" HD streams running at 25Mbps (that's where our connection tops out, so it was never going to exceed that) but I don't think any of the commercial services stream at that quality level.

One possibility is that you'd started watching in HD and tripped some kind of limit after which the connection began to be throttled down to a lower speed. Netflix is quite clever in that it is "continuously rate adaptive" and so can cope with that by downgrading the quality, Sony might not have that.

However I suspect that the clue is the report of the corrupted file and the thing dying again the second time. I've had this on Audible.co.uk (audiobooks) and on Netflix too. The source file is the problem and it requires them to replace it with a working one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just came across this:

http://www.ispreview...tv-service.html

Customers who pay £4.99 a month for the Entertainment Pass on Sky's broadband-based NOW TV service now have more than those annoying "Rights Restrictions" messages (here) to worry about after the live broadcast of popular TV show Game of Thrones (Season 4 : Episode 1) caused a surge in demand that disrupted connectivity.

Posts on the NOW TV Forum, which have been picked up on by Recombu, suggest that Monday's live 9pm broadcast of the TV show caused connectivity and slow loading problems as a result of allegedly "unforeseen high demand".

Does the Sony service happen to have "Game of Thrones" on it, too.. might you have started watching at perhaps 20:30 by any chance..?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just came across this:

http://www.ispreview...tv-service.html

Does the Sony service happen to have "Game of Thrones" on it, too.. might you have started watching at perhaps 20:30 by any chance..?

Cheers for that Mark, and your previous comment. Interestingly, the timing would be about right; however, we were just trying to watch the copy that I'd already downloaded a few days ago. I suppose some necessary communication to do with licensing might have suffered interference.

I think I'll try watching the next film in SD rather than HD, and see if that makes a difference (other than picture quality, of course!).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use PS3 on Now TV to watch the football occasionally.

It works well for me. £10 to watch three premiership matches plus anything else that is going on that weekend.

The odd stutter now and then but generally the picture quality is good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not 18 any more, and have no objection to paying a reasonable amount of cash to recompense the artists involved for their efforts; nor am I keen to take the risks involved with illegal downloading. However, I am also not interested in buying a library of films since I generally only ever watch them once. I just want to rent a film now and again, and now that Blockbusters has expired, using my lad's PS3 to download them from Sony seems the obvious way to go. If the technology worked, I'd be happy to use it! My question is: does the technology work for other people?

BTW, the DVD of the film in question (Hunger Games, Catching Fire) costs £9.99 from Amazon; £12.99 on Blu-ray.

I have held the same moral stance since dot and only very recently have I allowed my wife to watch dishonestly obtained downloads (second hand via a copy from a family friend) on the condition that anything we like has to then be bought legally (DVD). I got tired of paying for carp especially when they failed to download completely and we ran out of time.

We now have 2 terabytes and 1500 films including some of the latest (not yet out of the cinema). My children liked Frozen so we bought that and a few others so my concious is clear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Definitely agree regarding avoiding wi-fi on the ps3 for streaming (tp-link works a treat).

I'd strongly recommend Netflix as a service - it's very cheap considering. It won't have the latest releases (although they do hand out the occasional treat), but the range is improving every day (we were an early adopter purely for Breaking Bad, and back then it was like the bargain-bin at Blockbusters - mostly terrible with the occasional gem).

What I particularly admire about Netflix is their very relaxed, and publicly stated, attitude to sharing passwords (they limit the number of devices that can use the service concurrently, but not the location).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not 18 any more, and have no objection to paying a reasonable amount of cash to recompense the artists involved for their efforts

I imagine you aren't aware that 'artists' (not just actors but camera men, tailors, constructors, stunt-men, ...) involved in the production of a movie are generally paid a fixed amount for their work, only top stars do sometimes get a percentage of the profits on top of their fixed amount.

But of course if you enjoy throwing good money after bad to enrich Sony bosses and shareholders then by all means continue to pay silly prices for your time-restricted movie streams... :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have held the same moral stance since dot and only very recently have I allowed my wife to watch dishonestly obtained downloads (second hand via a copy from a family friend) on the condition that anything we like has to then be bought legally (DVD). I got tired of paying for carp especially when they failed to download completely and we ran out of time.

We now have 2 terabytes and 1500 films including some of the latest (not yet out of the cinema). My children liked Frozen so we bought that and a few others so my concious is clear.

I frequently download carp! :blink:

If I like a film and want to watch it again, I'm quite happy to buy the physical media, after all they don't cost much, and I'll never find it again in my floor to ceiling stack of disks! :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm quite happy to buy the physical media, after all they don't cost much

This is so true, most DVD cost pennies these days from third party sellers on Amazon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried to watch a film on PSN tonight and the streaming was awful. It kept stopping every 5 minutes so I gave up. I have no issues with Netflix streaming on the PS3 so it must be PSN that's broken. I sent them an email telling them how rubbish they are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I imagine you aren't aware that 'artists' (not just actors but camera men, tailors, constructors, stunt-men, ...) involved in the production of a movie are generally paid a fixed amount for their work, only top stars do sometimes get a percentage of the profits on top of their fixed amount.

But of course if you enjoy throwing good money after bad to enrich Sony bosses and shareholders then by all means continue to pay silly prices for your time-restricted movie streams... :rolleyes:

Oh yes, my mistake. I can't see any reason at all why there will not continue to be plenty of well-paid jobs for actors, cameramen, tailors, constructors and stunt-men when no-one is prepared to pay to see the films they make. :rolleyes:

Assuming the technology does work properly, watching a time-limited movie stream is exactly the same as renting one from Blockbusters, except that you can do it without leaving your home. And I know this is HPC, but I really don't consider £3.49, or £4.49 for HD, to be "silly money" for an evening's entertainment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
when no-one is prepared to pay to see the films they make. :rolleyes:

Of course if you are ignoring income from cinemas, DVDs, Blurays, broadcast rights to TV channels then I do understand why you think that 'no-one is prepared to pay to see the films'... :rolleyes:

I wouldn't even mind paying for movie downloads as long as they weren't encrypted and time-limited and as long as they don't make me jump through hoops to get my copy.

It's DRM I have an issue with (and quite clearly you too given your first post in this thread), not paying for movies.

---

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm building a website for my musical hero, an Italian DJ and composer. Free of charge. She wanted to know "why?" (given that I do this for a living, it's not some hobby or flight of fancy)

The answer was - because although I've bought pretty much everything you've ever released, mixed or been involved with (which is true), you only get a tiny cut of those sales, so this is a way to give you something back directly.

She might think I'm a bit mad. Perhaps so. Seems like a fair exchange to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   211 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.