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1929crash

Can We Brits Afford To Die?

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As people in Britain struggle with the low cost of everyday life and as austerity continues to bite, many people in the UK are struggling to afford what everyone has to pay for sooner or later, their own funeral.

The average price of a funeral in recession hit Britain is £7,622, more than 50 percent of what it cost three years ago. Britain is fast becoming one of the most expensive places to die in the world.

A study by the University of Bath published in January found that the average price of a funeral in the UK has risen by 80 percent over the past decade to almost £8,000; that’s double the price in the US at £4,200 and triple the cost of dying in France at £2,500.

The research from the University of Bath’s institute for Policy Research (IPR) found out that more than 100,000 people would struggle to afford their own funeral in 2014.

Jill Caruth, a pensioner, was diagnosed with leukemia in 2012 and was given months to live by doctors, so she started to plan her own funeral.

When she approached funeral directors she was forced to pay for things she didn’t want. She found that the minimum cost was £3,750 and when she asked how much less she would have to pay just to have a basic burial without a service and without anybody there, she was told that it wasn’t possible to reduce the fee, she explained to RT’s correspondent in the UK Polly Boiko.

Doctors have now given Jill the all clear from cancer, but she is determined to spread the word about how much money funeral directors are charging.

Kate Woodthorpe from the Center for Death and Society told RT that for ordinary people already struggling to make ends meet the cost of a funeral is no longer affordable.

“The cost of dying is around £7,500 this year and that includes the funeral, the discretionary costs, such as a car and estate administration and what we’re saying is those figures are going up above inflation every year. Twenty percent of people, one in five struggle to pay for it,” she said.

http://rt.com/news/uk-high-funeral-costs-221/

I'm at that age when I have begun to think about these things.

Edited by 1929crash

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http://rt.com/news/uk-high-funeral-costs-221/

I'm at that age when I have begun to think about these things.

Doesn't 'the state' provide at least a basic, non-means tested, burial/body disposal service for those who....are not fussed with ceremony and what not, have been 'taken by surprise' and have no arrangements in place, etc - at no cost?

And what of those who live alone? Have no readily traceable relatives, or such like. They're just gonna be left to rot where they are found?!

Edited by anonguest

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Doesn't 'the state' provide at least a basic, non-means tested, burial/body disposal service for those who....are not fussed with ceremony and what not, have been 'taken by surprise' and have no arrangements in place, etc - at no cost?

There was a thread on this a few months ago. If I remember correctly, you can deliver the corpse to a crematorium for "disposal only" at minimal cost, that would suit me.

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The baby boomers printed trillions of £s for themselves.

stands to reason, whatever life expenses they are now facing will inflate hugely.

Nursing care

Mobility scooters

home help

...

house insurance

heating costs...

...

get ready for huge inflation in false teeth and slippers too.

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http://www.peacefune..._west_yorkshire

Huddersfield Crem (where most of my relatives got toasted) £620 , Sorted.

Interesting. If you can get a DIY funeral done so cheaply, one has to ask whether funeral directors are going to put themselves out of business. Or is this what help-to-buy and the pension reforms are all about - subsidising funeral companies?

Edited by 1929crash

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<shrugs>I'm going to science, which I assume means some spotty oik cutting me up in a teaching hospital, as I suspect that even a blind, sclerotic, liver-damaged smoker with elephantiasis would reject my bits. I wanted to go to a body farm, but the wife and kids vetoed that and anyway we don't seem to have one in the UK.

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There was a thread on this a few months ago. If I remember correctly, you can deliver the corpse to a crematorium for "disposal only" at minimal cost, that would suit me.

Which kinda reinforces the point I was trying to make, not least in respect of the latter category I referred to (i.e living alone).

The article seems a complete non-issue to me. If it weren't for the fact that it was being presented as results of an academic study, rather than outright upfront by some relevant trades body (representing, say, undertakers) then I would have said it was a 'yawn' article - yet more vested interests persuading people to save their money to ultimately be spent on those VI's.

The fundamental cost of a funeral, just as for a wedding, is not very high. It's only peoples expectations/sense of entitlement that has risen and caused the rise in price. Just as one can get hitched at a registry and have a very simple 'do' afterwards (e.g down the pub) so to one can have a simple funeral (i.e. say a quick prayer, shove em in the ground and bugger off to the pub afterwards). :D

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Which kinda reinforces the point I was trying to make, not least in respect of the latter category I referred to (i.e living alone).

The article seems a complete non-issue to me. If it weren't for the fact that it was being presented as results of an academic study, rather than outright upfront by some relevant trades body (representing, say, undertakers) then I would have said it was a 'yawn' article - yet more vested interests persuading people to save their money to ultimately be spent on those VI's.

The fundamental cost of a funeral, just as for a wedding, is not very high. It's only peoples expectations/sense of entitlement that has risen and caused the rise in price. Just as one can get hitched at a registry and have a very simple 'do' afterwards (e.g down the pub) so to one can have a simple funeral (i.e. say a quick prayer, shove em in the ground and bugger off to the pub afterwards). :D

If I popped my clogs this evening - as a result of the clocks going forward (see OT Forum) - I reckon my family members would be bothered by my corpse just being dropped off at the local Crem, no matter how vociferously my last, dying gasps insisted otherwise.

Funerals are for those left behind, and they pay the price.

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If I popped my clogs this evening - as a result of the clocks going forward (see OT Forum) - I reckon my family members would be bothered by my corpse just being dropped off at the local Crem, no matter how vociferously my last, dying gasps insisted otherwise.

Funerals are for those left behind, and they pay the price.

Precisely my point. An individual need not worry about the cost of a funeral - no matter how ridiculous the private sector costs get.

If your husband/wife/parents/etc are more fussed than you are over what your funeral is going to be like, and whether or not it will meet their personal expectations then, as I always say, let them pay for it! Otherwise I couldn't care less. After all, it's not like I'm going to be in a position to have to listen to their whingeing/whining....... :D

Edited by anonguest

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When I was making the arrangements for my father's funeral I had to nominate the music, I asked what were the most popular selections. I can't remember the exact ranking but I know "Simply The Best" was up in the top three.

My big fat gypsy funeral.

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Funerals are just like lots of other things. Doing whats expected and following social norms.

Funeral directors don't do anything that a competent person or small group could do. Buy a coffin, place body in coffin, book burial plot or crematorium slot, keep coffin till disposal, transport body to disposal site and arrange and conduct service.

Not that long ago a lot of these tasks were done at home in communities.

The cost of a funeral is just what families decide they should be!

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When I was making the arrangements for my father's funeral I had to nominate the music, I asked what were the most popular selections. I can't remember the exact ranking but I know "Simply The Best" was up in the top three.

My big fat gypsy funeral.

I don't want my send off to be like that. I am going to choose Klingon opera.

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organised a couple of funerals last month. they come in at around £3k a pop. Not bad really when you break it down.

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Funerals are just like lots of other things. Doing whats expected and following social norms.

Funeral directors don't do anything that a competent person or small group could do. Buy a coffin, place body in coffin, book burial plot or crematorium slot, keep coffin till disposal, transport body to disposal site and arrange and conduct service.

Not that long ago a lot of these tasks were done at home in communities.

The cost of a funeral is just what families decide they should be!

Interesting put like that, but what about and why the need for preparing the body - embalming?

Last funeral I went to / dead body / wake was a year ago. People needed the moment to grieve and remember.

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When I was making the arrangements for my father's funeral I had to nominate the music, I asked what were the most popular selections. I can't remember the exact ranking but I know "Simply The Best" was up in the top three.

I am an (amateur) church organist, and have played for numerous funerals and memorial services.

In the two decades or so I've been doing this, I've noticed that an increasing proportion of funeral organisers are now opting for recorded music, apparently on account of cost. I (as per the policy in force across the C of E and RC dioceses in the region I used to play in Britain) charged £100 per funeral, which, when rehearsal time plus travelling to the church or crematorium is taken into account (this was frequently a 30-40 mile drive), meant that I made a significant loss on most of them. Basing the actual cost to me on travel expenses plus my hourly rate in my day job, most of them were at least double that. The PRS licence for playing recorded music at a funeral varies from roughly £20-70, depending on what is being played and the number of attendees (at the lower end of that range for a no-name pianist playing Bach, and the upper end for Celine Dion caterwauling - apparently her Sh!tanic song is now a funeral staple, which has inspired a number of politically incorrect jokes within the undertaking profession).

I find it interesting that an increasing proportion of families opted for recorded music to save around £50 on a total event cost of several grand. It almost never happened at weddings. The vicars/priests/ministers at all the churches I played at regularly had hardly any weddings with no live music at all, though a significant number had a happy clappy band playing Graham Kendrick-type sh!te rather than a traditional organ (and in some cases choir). Roughly in accordance with Musicians' Union and Royal College of Organists guidelines (though I wasn't a member of either), I also charged £100 per wedding, plus an extra £200 if my performance was to be videoed with copies for distribution to attendees. I had one or two complaints about the extra fee for recording rights, but no-one ever refused to pay it.

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The baby boomers printed trillions of £s for themselves.

stands to reason, whatever life expenses they are now facing will inflate hugely.

Nursing care

Mobility scooters

home help

...

house insurance

heating costs...

...

get ready for huge inflation in false teeth and slippers too.

bugger, my partner recently threw out a perfectly decent pair of my slippers.:blink:

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bugger, my partner recently threw out a perfectly decent pair of my slippers.:blink:

Slipper shops, glasses shops, hearing aid shops, mobility shops, pedicure shops, gardeners, home help, meals on wheels, care homes.....buy your plot before GPI. ;)

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When I was making the arrangements for my father's funeral I had to nominate the music, I asked what were the most popular selections. I can't remember the exact ranking but I know "Simply The Best" was up in the top three.

My big fat gypsy funeral.

My mums favourite was 'Wind Beneath My Wings.'

Thankfully the small chapel in France that held the service didn't have a sound system.

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I am an (amateur) church organist, and have played for numerous funerals and memorial services.

In the two decades or so I've been doing this, I've noticed that an increasing proportion of funeral organisers are now opting for recorded music, apparently on account of cost. I (as per the policy in force across the C of E and RC dioceses in the region I used to play in Britain) charged £100 per funeral, which, when rehearsal time plus travelling to the church or crematorium is taken into account (this was frequently a 30-40 mile drive), meant that I made a significant loss on most of them. Basing the actual cost to me on travel expenses plus my hourly rate in my day job, most of them were at least double that. The PRS licence for playing recorded music at a funeral varies from roughly £20-70, depending on what is being played and the number of attendees (at the lower end of that range for a no-name pianist playing Bach, and the upper end for Celine Dion caterwauling - apparently her Sh!tanic song is now a funeral staple, which has inspired a number of politically incorrect jokes within the undertaking profession).

I find it interesting that an increasing proportion of families opted for recorded music to save around £50 on a total event cost of several grand. It almost never happened at weddings. The vicars/priests/ministers at all the churches I played at regularly had hardly any weddings with no live music at all, though a significant number had a happy clappy band playing Graham Kendrick-type sh!te rather than a traditional organ (and in some cases choir). Roughly in accordance with Musicians' Union and Royal College of Organists guidelines (though I wasn't a member of either), I also charged £100 per wedding, plus an extra £200 if my performance was to be videoed with copies for distribution to attendees. I had one or two complaints about the extra fee for recording rights, but no-one ever refused to pay it.

Can you post the jokes in the OT forum? Many of us here like the politically incorrect ones.:ph34r:

I think this is more to do with the larger firms taking over the smaller ones aka that fine US series '6 feet under'. Once they had that 'greater control of the market' they were able to hike charges accordingly. Most people will not shop around when it comes to funerals either taking as read the first price they hear in the first parlour they go into.

There still are smaller operators out there and I know at least one who undercuts the likes of the Co-op.

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