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Nick Clegg Clashes With Nigel Farage

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It'll make no difference doing business with Europe whether we are in or out.

Clegg is insulting our intelligence.

Farage may not be everyones cup of tea but his point is still valid and he got it across fairly well last night.

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I can honestly say there was nothing Nick Clegg said that even made me budge.

Criminals back from Europe. Well if your a criminal on the run don't go to Europe surely we should be getting criminals back from all over the world not just Europe.

Can't claim benefits for 3 months. When I lost my job after paying NI for 34 years I wasn't able to claim anything ZERO.

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I see Farage questioned the official narrative on Ukraine - this has brought quite a few 'outraged' remarks on lib Dem Voice this morning.

Well done Nigel, I say.

How on earth can anybody trust anything that Clegg says?

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I see Farage questioned the official narrative on Ukraine - this has brought quite a few 'outraged' remarks on lib Dem Voice this morning.

Well done Nigel, I say.

How on earth can anybody trust anything that Clegg says?

How can anyone trust anything that Farage says?

Nigel Farage: 2010 UKIP manifesto was 'drivel'

How long before UKIP's 2014 manifesto is also dismissed as drivel?

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I see Farage questioned the official narrative on Ukraine - this has brought quite a few 'outraged' remarks on lib Dem Voice this morning.

Well done Nigel, I say.

How on earth can anybody trust anything that Clegg says?

But haven't the Ukraine got a super gun that can hit Britain in 45 minutes or was that somebody else? :unsure:

My point is what ever your views are on the Ukraine they are made up from what you are being feed. So the best answer is to say you just don't know.

Edited by gf3

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Not a big fan of Farage or UKIP but came over far better.

London builder in the audience and all Clegg could keep bringing up was immigrants and benefits. The builder will have had his cost of living increased while having to compete with East European labour.

Clegg going on about how much immigrants contribute, in which case why isn't the Government awash with cash?

And of course immigrants do get benefits, they just claim as self employed.

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How can anyone trust anything that Farage says?

Nigel Farage: 2010 UKIP manifesto was 'drivel'

How long before UKIP's 2014 manifesto is also dismissed as drivel?

By extension that doesn't bode well for anyone else either. Can you imagine another party leader saying a similar thing, even if the actions of the party in Government amount to the same view; i.e. the manifesto bore no resemblance to the legislative programme enacted?

Edited by The Knimbies who say no

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Let`s face it, anyone who begins their argument with "It is for your safety" is on the ropes before they start. Clegg looked like he was drowning in quicksand for most of it, he did come back with a couple of good debating points (he is a seasoned politician after all) but I don`t think they were presented truthfully. Farage will have secured quite a few more votes for his party with that performance.

Edited by dances with sheeple

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How can anyone trust anything that Farage says?

Nigel Farage: 2010 UKIP manifesto was 'drivel'

How long before UKIP's 2014 manifesto is also dismissed as drivel?

I don't disagree - but the tuition fees pledge was a bit more than a manifesto item, to be discarded as and when necessary.

Every Lib Dem candidate including Clegg pledged personally to vote against any increase. Then three weeks later it was ditched.

I don't think that even marriage vows are ditched so lightly.

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I'm for staying in. Doesn't alter the fact that imo Farage won this contest by a mile.

Farage is quite likeable, perhaps because he isn't a career politician. He seems to have a non argumentative and pleasant manner. Those who really annoy like Ed Balls, Ed Miliband and even David Cameron could learn a lot from him. Clegg's about the best MP the pro-Europeans could have put up in the debate, he is reasonably innocuous in the irritant stakes.

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I don't disagree - but the tuition fees pledge was a bit more than a manifesto item, to be discarded as and when necessary.

Every Lib Dem candidate including Clegg pledged personally to vote against any increase. Then three weeks later it was ditched.

I don't think that even marriage vows are ditched so lightly.

Telling though that Farage tackled the question about his wife on the payroll head on ( and gave a good justification IMO) Clegg wouldn`t address the tuition fees question from the same e-mail.

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By extension that doesn't bode well for anyone else either. Can you imagine another party leader saying a similar thing, even if the actions of the party in Government amount to the same view; i.e. the manifesto bore no resemblance to the legislative programme enacted?

With a coalition government, it is obviously impossible for the individual parties to fully implement their own manifestos; the legislative program has to be a compromise, which is inevitably biased towards the wishes of the larger coalition partner. With single party government, the legislative program should, of course, follow the party's manifesto more closely, but will by necessity also have to reflect current circumstances.

Edited by snowflux

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With a coalition government, it is obviously impossible for the individual parties to fully implement their own manifestos; the legislative program has to be a compromise, which is inevitably biased towards the wishes of the larger coalition partner. With single party government, the legislative program should, of course, follow the party's manifesto more closely, but will by necessity also have to reflect current circumstances.

But if you as a candidate have signed a pledge to personally vote against an increase, then you cannot justify then voting for an increase.

Surely some Lib Dem candidate must have realised this point when promising and signing the pledge? And then when negotiating the coalition agreement? Or are the Lib Dems even more stupid than I thought?

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With a coalition government, it is obviously impossible for the individual parties to fully implement their own manifestos; the legislative program has to be a compromise, which is inevitably biased towards the wishes of the larger coalition partner. With single party government, the legislative program should, of course, follow the party's manifesto more closely, but will by necessity also have to reflect current circumstances.

I'm sorry darling that I slept with that woman while on a business trip, but current circumstances meant that I was horny and you were five hundred miles away.

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I don't disagree - but the tuition fees pledge was a bit more than a manifesto item, to be discarded as and when necessary.

Every Lib Dem candidate including Clegg pledged personally to vote against any increase. Then three weeks later it was ditched.

I don't think that even marriage vows are ditched so lightly.

The LibDems could promise anything when they never thought they'd be called upon to deliver.

As for Clegg, he has IMO always been blindly pro-Europe. It is like one of the more fanatical types of religion with such people. If he had had anything to do with it we would have been in the Euro like a shot and to me that is enough reason to doubt his credibility on anything.

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All we want is a vote, farage being in power is not what anyone wants including him I expect

Then vote Conservative in the general election. If the Conservatives are elected with an absolute majority, they will have to hold a referendum on the UK's membership of the EU. There is no way they could politically go back on that promise. Another coalition, however, would give them a way out, especially given that Cameron would probably no longer be PM.

Also, there's no a lot of point voting UKIP in the euro elections. No matter how many UKIP MEP's we have, they do not have the power to take the UK out of the EU; they simply cripple our ability to exercise influence within the EU.

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With a coalition government, it is obviously impossible for the individual parties to fully implement their own manifestos; the legislative program has to be a compromise, which is inevitably biased towards the wishes of the larger coalition partner. With single party government, the legislative program should, of course, follow the party's manifesto more closely, but will by necessity also have to reflect current circumstances.

Then at the very least, you would expect all the LibDem MPs to very publicly apologise for not being able to deliver on a very firm promise; "it's a coalition, we can only deliver a small part of what we promised, but it's better than nothing".

Their PR at the start of the coalition was awful, and left a lot of people (myself included) confused as to what exactly the LibDems were doing in government.

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I shall be voting UKIP at the next election but it has nothing to do with Europe.

Actually, I would prefer to stay in the EU.

Regarding last nights debate, I thought Farage won hands down. Clegg appeared wrong footed and shifty.

Edited by Bruce Banner

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Then vote Conservative in the general election. If the Conservatives are elected with an absolute majority, they will have to hold a referendum on the UK's membership of the EU. There is no way they could politically go back on that promise. Another coalition, however, would give them a way out, especially given that Cameron would probably no longer be PM.

Also, there's no a lot of point voting UKIP in the euro elections. No matter how many UKIP MEP's we have, they do not have the power to take the UK out of the EU; they simply cripple our ability to exercise influence within the EU.

Unless circumstances dictate otherwise - your words.

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