Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Gigantic Purple Slug

Large Rat

Recommended Posts

One time, when I was a student on a mapping project, a marmot chewed its way into my tent, gnawed lengthways through a loaf of bread, then chewed its way out of the tent on the other side. You could look right through the holes.

That was our first encounter. We had a bit of a Caddyshack thing going on for a few weeks back there

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shot a few last summer with my newly acquired Sniper lookalike airgun.

Boy do they leap and squeak when you pop one in the ass.

BTW a Rat is just about the only living thing i am happy to shoot.

I've got ducks you see, and the corn munching vermin must be controlled.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I once saw a massive red eared terrapin sitting on a lump of concrete in Regents Canal, London. I swear it was glaring at me as I cycled past.

Ken Livingstone often did that. He felt it brought him closer to his newts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's nice. A really quite rare specimen killed by humans. The idea of catching and releasing it in the wild obviously didn't figure. We really are a shite species which sometimes doesn't deserve to be on this planet.

Most pests are come in human form.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shot a few last summer with my newly acquired Sniper lookalike airgun.

Boy do they leap and squeak when you pop one in the ass.

BTW a Rat is just about the only living thing i am happy to shoot.

I've got ducks you see, and the corn munching vermin must be controlled.

I have never shot the Stoeger. Glad it works well for you. Last time we had a rat problem I used a BSA Super10 in .22. That worked well. It really is the best way with rats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He's about 5'6 and the most annoying 68 year old I know.

That's rather specific Sarah, know a lot of 68 year olds do you? :P

That rat's terrifying, imagine turning the loght on in the kitchen and seeing that!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's rather specific Sarah, know a lot of 68 year olds do you? :P

That rat's terrifying, imagine turning the loght on in the kitchen and seeing that!

Just one I think. Actually maybe a couple but I have a specific OB in mind.

I was trying to work out how big that style of trap is.

Feck yeah - seeing it live would be horrid. At least dead and it's head stuck in a trap you know you're safe.

We had a pretty huge one on our drive a few years ago. Not sure if it died of old age or a cat had got it, it didn't look injured just dead.

I did read James Herbert's the Rats when I was a teen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's nice. A really quite rare specimen killed by humans. The idea of catching and releasing it in the wild obviously didn't figure. We really are a shite species which sometimes doesn't deserve to be on this planet.

Most pests are come in human form.

I agree, 'pest' is subjective. It's rather like the concept of 'dirt', i.e. something not in its rightful place.

But I can't really see how the rat is a 'rare specimen'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to keep rats.

They are great pets, very intelligent and learn commands like a dog might.

That said, If I found that rat in my house I to would be reaching for the airgun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to keep rats.

They are great pets, very intelligent and learn commands like a dog might.

That said, If I found that rat in my house I to would be reaching for the airgun!

I had a pet one once too. Very smart and tenacious little creature.

Shame about the big 'un in the article. I quite fancy a giant african one as a pet:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-19584422

but they are apparently a bit of a handful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rats are individuals too. ;)

When you kill something, it is a sobering thought that you are not just killing that rat but you are killing everything that might come after. You are literally killing the future. Limiting the scope of possible future outcomes, lopping off an evolutionary branch.

I will always look for a non lethal solution to a pest problem first. With a rat infestation however there really is only one way. Kill the rats. Concrete the holes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will always look for a non lethal solution to a pest problem first. With a rat infestation however there really is only one way. Kill the rats. Concrete the holes.

If this thing can chew through concrete and can walk off after being caught in a trap I'm not convinced there is a non lethal solution. Do rats have a homing instinct ? Would anyone want to risk the chance that the thing might come back ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, 'pest' is subjective. It's rather like the concept of 'dirt', i.e. something not in its rightful place.

But I can't really see how the rat is a 'rare specimen'.

In the pictures it looks magnificent compared to any other rat I've seen, if they all looked like that and grew to that size someone would be raising them for fur and meat.

So I would say that rat was a rare specimen, but I'd still have killed it if I found it in the kitchen!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If this thing can chew through concrete and can walk off after being caught in a trap I'm not convinced there is a non lethal solution. Do rats have a homing instinct ? Would anyone want to risk the chance that the thing might come back ?

Nail. Head.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to keep rats.

They are great pets, very intelligent and learn commands like a dog might.

That said, If I found that rat in my house I to would be reaching for the airgun!

I've known a few people keep rats as pets! They do have a habit of nibbling everything though!

When cables are installed in ducts by the telephone companies, they allow enough space for a rat to get through, otherwise they chew their way through the cables.

The percentage free space use to be known as "rattage"!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My friend used to have a couple. He bought one from a pet shop which then had babies a few days later. So he had more than he planned.

The last two were great bit fat buggers that were very tame.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our kids had pet rats, one of them still does. I won't draw her attention to this or she'd want one. A 15" rat, preferably a bald one, would be her ideal pet.

Ha! You just reminded me of Peter Jackson's film "Brain Dead"! :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If this thing can chew through concrete and can walk off after being caught in a trap I'm not convinced there is a non lethal solution. Do rats have a homing instinct ? Would anyone want to risk the chance that the thing might come back ?

They have a strong homing instinct. A mouse will find it's way back even if you release it a mile or so away. I suspect Rattus Gigantus would probably find his way back from mainland Europe - gnawing his passage all of the way.

A magnificent beastie and a shame to kill it - but you're probably right on the need for execution. I'd get rid of the useless cat too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   206 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.