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Brighton Btl Facts!

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Just found out these very interesting facts about Brighton (well, I thought it was interesting anyway!)

Turns out Brighton is the "buy to let capital of the Uk"- apparently there have been more BTL mortgages taken out here than anywhere else in the UK.

In the brighton & Hove area, there are apparently 97,000 rental properties for a population of 250,000.

There are 2 universities which accounts for some of it but it still seems very high.

Would anyone have any info or statistics on national ratios of rental properties to population? Does this seem very high?

I know this has been said countless times before on this site, but Brighton seems like one massive timebomb waiting to go off.

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Just found out these very interesting facts about Brighton (well, I thought it was interesting anyway!)

Turns out Brighton is the "buy to let capital of the Uk"- apparently there have been more BTL mortgages taken out here than anywhere else in the UK.

In the brighton & Hove area, there are apparently 97,000 rental properties for a population of 250,000.

There are 2 universities which accounts for some of it but it still seems very high.

Would anyone have any info or statistics on national ratios of rental properties to population? Does this seem very high?

I know this has been said countless times before on this site, but Brighton seems like one massive timebomb waiting to go off.

I know of one man who sold 70 or so of his own BTL's (his whole stock I think) in the last 6 months or so.

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Guest Time 2 raise Interest Rates

Canny old bunch them shirt lifters. Sad thing is, I can see a lot

of them losing their shirts. :o

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My only comment is that I watched a TV programme back in about 2001 looking at HPs in Brighton before, during and after the last crash.

It was staggering how much HPs rose in Brighton during the last bubble and even more staggering how far they fell - several properties highlighted ended up cheaper post crash than they were prior to the bubble starting.

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My only comment is that I watched a TV programme back in about 2001 looking at HPs in Brighton before, during and after the last crash.

It was staggering how much HPs rose in Brighton during the last bubble and even more staggering how far they fell - several properties highlighted ended up cheaper post crash than they were prior to the bubble starting.

I am salivating! (and no doubt dreaming)

NDL

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Canny old bunch them shirt lifters. Sad thing is, I can see a lot

of them losing their shirts. :o

The guy I knew was a friends landlord and one of the god-squad I think (maybe he had a revelation). Got rid of them all pretty fast as well, no idea when he bought (before 2003 at least) but think he got decent prices for them all. So depending on your view of the market the residents of Brighton might not be too savvy as a whole. Can't say for the "shirtlifters" as they tend to live in out on the east side.

Edited by algor

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This was reported by Hometrack, 24 Oct 2005.

http://www.hometrack.co.uk/news/

Of the cities, two have seen price rises, 40 have remained static and 12 have seen price falls. The cities reporting the largest falls this month are Brighton (-2.0%), Plymouth (-1.9%), Milton Keynes (-1.7%), Reading (-0.7%) and Lincoln (-0.7%).

You could call that a 24% annual fall in prices, wonder how long the BTL muppets will feel like subsidising their tenants with that type of capital appreciation?

Anyway, panicking is just sooooo last year.

Wonder what their strategy will be for next year?

Edited by BandWagon

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Price movements in Brighton - now there's an interesting one.

As you mentioned, Hometrack reported -2.0%, and if memory serves, one of Nationwide's more recent quarterly reports actually said that Brighton was down 7% on the year.

So why does the UpMyStreet graph for Brighton show no downward movement at all ?

Answers on a postcard or a stick of rock please... ;)

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My only comment is that I watched a TV programme back in about 2001 looking at HPs in Brighton before, during and after the last crash.

It was staggering how much HPs rose in Brighton during the last bubble and even more staggering how far they fell - several properties highlighted ended up cheaper post crash than they were prior to the bubble starting.

That is also very interesting as exactly the same things has happened again- Brighton has seen price rises way above the national average- I know someone (and this is true) who bought a 5 storey house in brighton for 75K in 1996 and sold it last year for 450K!

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Turns out Brighton is the "buy to let capital of the Uk"- apparently there have been more BTL mortgages taken out here than anywhere else in the UK.

In the brighton & Hove area, there are apparently 97,000 rental properties for a population of 250,000.

:o Very interesting! There could be other reasons why Brighton will be badly hit by falling house prices:

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/ind...ndpost&p=234751

I love living in Brighton and I wish I could stay. But I can't afford to live a good life here because house prices and rents are at London levels, but wages aren't! I'd like to have a home so we can start thinking about a family. So I have to decide soon whether to leave for London for a couple of years to save money.

Until recently, I lived in a tiny dark flat that, together with its twin, had been converted from a larger flat. The rent was cheap for Brighton at £570. Brighton is full of newly converted flats like these but I can't imagine once the house buying frenzy subsiding anybody wanting to buy and live in these flats for a good proportion of their working lives. They're so small and dark and depressing, it's difficult to have friends around, and hard to live as a couple for any length of time, let alone trying to raise a child in them.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
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