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swissy_fit

F1 Fans Don't Like Their Brum-Brums Changed....

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Surely some speakers that play loud noises as the cars pass should do the trick?

http://uk.eurosport.yahoo.com/blogs/motorhead-uk/f1-cars-jumped-milk-floats-does-anyone-really-154950113.html

The cheapest tickets to watch Formula One on race day at Silverstone are £150. You're more or less guaranteed to spend several hours sitting in gridlocked traffic on your way to and from the circuit. And if you actually want to follow what's going on, you'd be far better off sitting at home and watching it on TV.

But fans come in their hundreds of thousands, to Silverstone, to Monza, to Spa, to every F1 track on the circuit for one thing: the mesmerising, irresistible, visceral thrill of being up close to the most amazing racing machines on the planet. And the single most important element of that appeal lies in the sound of the cars.

That's what you have to remember should you be inclined to dismiss the concerns about the eco-friendly 2014 cars being too quiet. Noise isn't just part of the sideshow of F1; to the petrolheads who pay big money to attend the races themselves, it is absolutely at the heart of F1.

We're not just talking about a noise that's a little quieter versus a noise that is more raucous.

We're talking about the difference between a noise that is loud and exciting, and one that is so loud, so ridiculously over-the-top loud, that you can literally feel your internal organs vibrating as the sound waves crush through your body. It's so loud that you'd not be in the least bit surprised if blood started pouring out of your ears.

Of course, most TV viewers won't know the difference. Sure, you'll notice the change in tone of the engine - but if your TV is set to the same volume, you'll not notice any difference in the absolute level of that noise. The microphones and sound mixing technicians see to that; just as they could turn a whisper up to the volume of a shout, or turn down a shout to the volume of a whisper, they can make sure that the fans at home barely notice the change.

But at the track, it's very different. The 2014 cars have small V6 turbo-charged engines instead of large V8 naturally-aspirated blocks under their figurative bonnets, a change which - together with a limit on RPM and the ever-larger electrical boosters in the powerplants - give the cars a far lower sound level that's characterised by a distinctive turbo whine and electrical whirr in the background.

It's a difference that can only really be appreciated in person - but this internet video does go some of the way to showing the difference:

No less an authority than F1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone has admitted that he was not impressed.

Ecclestone, while still in charge of F1 as a business despite his impending court case, has no more than advisory input into the rules and regulations, which are decided by the FIA.

"I was not horrified by the noise, I was horrified by the lack of it," he told the Daily Telegraph.

"And I was sorry to be proved right with what I've said all along - these cars don't sound like racing cars.

"I've been speaking with Jean (Todt, president of the FIA) and what I've said is we need to see whether there is some way of making them sound like racing cars.

"I don't know whether it's possible, but we should investigate.

"I think let's get the first few races out of the way and then maybe look to do something. We can't wait all season. It could be too late by then."

Ecclestone might be right - but how much of a problem is it?

Formula One has for many years been a made-for-TV spectacle that fans enjoy going to in person, rather than the other way round. And so while the lack of noise is an issue for those in the pit lane and the stands, it's probably a complete irrelevance for the estimated 450 million people around the world who tune into a race each season.

Only time will tell if the quiet engines affect viewing figures in 2014. But Motorhead's best guess is that a closely-fought, exciting championship will be a far bigger draw for most fans than marginally more exciting engine noises coming through the weedy speakers on your telly.

If F1 delivers that in 2014 then nobody watching the race from the comfort of their sofa will care if the cars are powered by 140 decibel V8s - or the jumped-up milk float engines that the new regulations have brought us.

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I always thought the #1 attraction (#=number, that is NOT a hashtag) was to see someone splatter at 300mph?

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If F1 delivers that in 2014 then nobody watching the race from the comfort of their sofa will care if the cars are powered by 140 decibel V8s - or the jumped-up milk float engines that the new regulations have brought us.

Nah, the petrol heads get turned on by the engine sounds. I am told that people used to try and get the positions on the track where the engines are the loudest. Good ear-plugs are an F1 race are vital for the spectators..

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sounds just like scalextric now: no wonder the punters are miffed.

Now there's an idea! How about a track layout like this to bring back the excitement:

C1310T-crossovercornernew.jpg

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Nah, the petrol heads get turned on by the engine sounds. I am told that people used to try and get the positions on the track where the engines are the loudest. Good ear-plugs are an F1 race are vital for the spectators..

Many years ago I went to some practice sessions a week or so before (they were free to get in to), only found out as we were leaving that free earplugs were available.

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:rolleyes:

What are they going to say when it finally goes all-electric?

The days of the ICE are numbered, it's just a matter of time now.

It's going to seem a bit silly if they try and cling to screaming IC engines in 20 years when everyone is driving cars that are faster, quieter, less polluting and more efficient.

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Oddly enough, the thing that's always put me off watching on TV is the racket the things make.

The OP's argument makes it sound like a hugely visceral experience in person though - and I could see why fans would be reluctant to lose it. Some strategically placed amplification is probably the answer though. It works for rock bands - why not motorsport?

Equally, while I'd happily live without the dubious benefits of private car ownership (especially those powered by ICE) tomorrow - I'd have no problem in making an exception for motorsport. Burning huge amounts of petrol for rare sporting events that entertain millions seems a far better thing than having millions burn this valuable commodity on a trip to Tesco.

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:blink: I have heard this rumour, or rather, I haven't

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Whenever I watch it on TV it's just an endless loop of advertising for Bridgestone, Shell, RBS, Wealth Asset Management blah blah blah.

Like being trapped in an iPad.

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I now drive a car with a bigger engine than an F1 car now. :lol: (it has 2 less cylinders mind).

How long before F1 go all electric, or methane powered? :ph34r:

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I now drive a car with a bigger engine than an F1 car now. :lol: (it has 2 less cylinders mind).

How long before F1 go all electric, or methane powered? :ph34r:

How about pedals?

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:rolleyes:

What are they going to say when it finally goes all-electric?

The days of the ICE are numbered, it's just a matter of time now.

It's going to seem a bit silly if they try and cling to screaming IC engines in 20 years when everyone is driving cars that are faster, quieter, less polluting and more efficient.

All depends if the powers that be/big money men can make money out of it/tax it on a mainstream scale.

Electric is cheap as chips for electric vehicles. If most/all use electric cars where is the extra revenue needed going to come from?

I would guess electric vehicles at the moment are being heavily subsidised by the firms other operations.

Look at how the price of vegetable oil went up once it was mainstream knowledge it could be used in older diesels.

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Never understood the appeal of big engines/noise on domestic roads, but the ear-splitting noise of F1 is definately a huge part of the experience.

Somewhere like Monaco in particular, with the unbelievable volume bouncing off the tall ampitheatre of buildings, even at relatively lower speeds around some of the track, is an incredibly visceral, adrenalin inducing, body shaking experience. It's how the crowd participates with the event. Through their nervous system.

F1 is all about the sound. Seems like a major error to have curtailed that.

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I don't really agree but then I've never been to a race (going to Silverstone this year). If the racing is exciting that's all that matters. It wasn't exciting today, went in the shower after the first round of pit stops and put it back on when done. Mercedes are too far ahead at the moment.

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Never understood the appeal of big engines/noise on domestic roads, but the ear-splitting noise of F1 is definately a huge part of the experience.

Somewhere like Monaco in particular, with the unbelievable volume bouncing off the tall ampitheatre of buildings, even at relatively lower speeds around some of the track, is an incredibly visceral, adrenalin inducing, body shaking experience. It's how the crowd participates with the event. Through their nervous system.

F1 is all about the sound. Seems like a major error to have curtailed that.

At least they've still got the tedious repetitiveness of the action and mind-numbing predictability of the outcome to look forward too, just is it always was.

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The days of the ICE are numbered, it's just a matter of time now.

We'll all be riding unicorns before we're all driving electric cars.

Electric cars are an antiquated technology our ancestors abandoned because the ICE was so much better. Nothing much has changed about the technology to make it any more viable today; batteries still suck and still take forever to charge.

Now, maybe you could make it viable for three laps around a Formula-1 track, but why would any car manufacturer pay tons of money to develop racing cars that provide no useful technological improvements to their bread-and-butter models?

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