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House Not Connected To Mains Sewers

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Hi,

I have a seen an old house for sale with my local estate agent, however it is not connected to mains sewer and there is no septic tank. Though I believe it is connected to mains water.

As it had been previously occupied I'm not sure what the previous owner did...

Would anyone here have a vague idea as to how difficult and/or expensive it would be to get a house connected to main sewers? There are other houses in the immediate area, and there is a housing estate not very far down the road from it.

Would the first thing to do to contact either (I don't know) DOE or NI Water or some other dept to discover if there is a mains sewer running along the road outside the house?

Any other info would be greatly appreciated! Thanks.

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you are not allowed septic tanks any more. Modern detergents have rendered them useless as the bacteria necessary to make them work is included in the 99.9%.

What you have to do now, if no public sewer is available is a mechanical system. it just keeps everything moving and introduces air into the system and this seams to work. I guess £10k.

However if there is a sewer network you have to connect to it as we cant have a town or city full of mini treatment plants. Connecting to the main system should be cheaper than installing your own tank. However, once you start on a old house it can be difficult to stop. you might find the old pipes are clay and have moved or roots have grown into them and this could turn into a bigger job than you thought. But once you have it done you can then be content with it.

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Connecting to the main system should be cheaper than installing your own tank. However, once you start on a old house it can be difficult to stop. you might find the old pipes are clay and have moved or roots have grown into them and this could turn into a bigger job than you thought. But once you have it done you can then be content with it.

Do you know which dept I should contact to determine if there is a mains sewer pipe under the road at the front of the house?

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Do you know which dept I should contact to determine if there is a mains sewer pipe under the road at the front of the house?

NI Water are responsible for both storm and sewer connections.My link

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I discovered today that the house has a septic tank but on someone elses ground. The house will be sold *without* the facility to any longer use this tank.

I also learned that the house is located too far from mains sewers to feasibly have it connected.

you are not allowed septic tanks any more.

I was speaking with someone at NI Water today and he did not indicate that this was the case. He seemed to indicate that septic tanks are still put in.

Any suggestions?

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I discovered today that the house has a septic tank but on someone elses ground. The house will be sold *without* the facility to any longer use this tank.

I also learned that the house is located too far from mains sewers to feasibly have it connected.

I was speaking with someone at NI Water today and he did not indicate that this was the case. He seemed to indicate that septic tanks are still put in.

Any suggestions?

No they are no longer allowed. What you can do, if deemed 'not to be served' is apply for the motorised treatment plants. I have one at my own house. It is two underground chambers, like large oil tanks with various pumps and moving parts that airaite the waste. You still need a licence to discharge into a local stream/shough, as what goes in, must come out. If you have particular stony ground you may be able to get consent for natural dissipation but you will require a engineer to establish this for you. the suppliers of the equipment FMM in Newry is but one will do all this for you (for a price).

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No they are no longer allowed. What you can do, if deemed 'not to be served' is apply for the motorised treatment plants. I have one at my own house. It is two underground chambers, like large oil tanks with various pumps and moving parts that airaite the waste. You still need a licence to discharge into a local stream/shough,

Having checked on Google Satellite view, I'm not aware of any local stream.

There is a new house built next door and a few other new houses not far, albeit on larger sites. Since there's no main sewer pipe there I'm wondering what are they doing with their waste? Perhaps they are using natural dissipation which you mentioned.

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Having checked on Google Satellite view, I'm not aware of any local stream.

There is a new house built next door and a few other new houses not far, albeit on larger sites. Since there's no main sewer pipe there I'm wondering what are they doing with their waste? Perhaps they are using natural dissipation which you mentioned.

Stream may be too strond a word. a shough of open drain, with moving water will be sufficient. this will not always be visible on Google earth.

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Stream may be too strond a word. a shough of open drain, with moving water will be sufficient.

Would the Northern Ireland Environment Agency know and be able to inform me if the house has access to a shough? Or if the very close-by new houses are discharging into a shough?

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Would the Northern Ireland Environment Agency know and be able to inform me if the house has access to a shough? Or if the very close-by new houses are discharging into a shough?

No

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No

So essentially if buying such a house, the purchaser is taking the gamble that there is a shough available?

Presumably then the only way to know what the neighbours in the adjacent houses do is to simply ask them?

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So essentially if buying such a house, the purchaser is taking the gamble that there is a shough available?

Presumably then the only way to know what the neighbours in the adjacent houses do is to simply ask them?

you need to get a builder, experienced is such works to have a look at it and more importantly, to give you a quote for what is involved. He may find a simpler solution.

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