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Frank Hovis

How Does A Wolf Change A River?

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Essentially prior to the reintroduction of a small number of wolves at Yellowstone the deer were stripping the vegetation down to nothing, making it a sterile habitat for any other animal and stopping trees growing. When the wolves came back the deer started avoiding areas where they could be trapped, such as valleys, and the trees regrew and all the other wildlife exploded into life.

Culling deer as was done pre-1995 didn't have the same effect as it didn't deter deer from certain areas.

The change to the river is stabilisation of the banks owing to the tree growth and less silting for the same reason.

You'll have to tune out the schoolboyish enthusiasm of the narrator for an interesting story that I don't think anybody could have predicted to that degree.

Reintroduction in Scotland has been mooted before, I couldn't really see the point but having seen this it could transform some of the Hghlands.

From a Telegraph story:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/good-to-share/10668580/How-wolves-have-the-power-to-move-rivers.html

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You'll have to tune out the schoolboyish enthusiasm of the narrator for an interesting story that I don't think anybody could have predicted to that degree.

These days it's nice to hear someone so enthusiastic about something besides X Factor or some other ********

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These days it's nice to hear someone so enthusiastic about something besides X Factor or some other ********

Well yes, but it's like listening to Jacqui Oatley commentating on football. Annoying.

(I'm fine with women commentators generally before anybody rushes to her defence)

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Fantastic video. Nature is so cleverly fine tuned and balanced. For the opposite effect, see the effect of the introduction of Cane Toads in Australia.

On an urban level, and hardly the scale of Yellowstone Park; my back garden. When I moved here just over a year ago the garden was a mess and pretty lifeless, so I pruned stuff back and plants begain to grow better and bud and flower. Insects, bees and butterflys arrived and then birds started to appear. Put a bird feeder out and more birds arrived, Wood Pigeons, Sparrows, Robin, Nuthatch, Blackbirds, Dunnock, Goldcrest etc... Went down the shops last weekend and spent a fiver on a different type of bird feeder and now I've got Rose Necked Parakeets in the garden (this is Twickenham). It's all gone a bit Ace Ventura Pet Detective out there.

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Reintroduction in Scotland has been mooted before, I couldn't really see the point but having seen this it could transform some of the Hghlands.

My understanding is that the current bracken-heavy Highland landscape is down to sheep not eating bracken, whenever they can avoid it, but noshing everything else they can get their snouts into. Once bracken is established in open ground nothing else gets a look in.

Personally, I suspect that a more diverse landscape would be better all round. My understanding is that the bloke who's been talking about reintroducing wolves (and I believe bears as well) is a minted geezer who's been transforming his 20,000+ acres into some kind of primeval (personal) theme park.

You could look upon the proposal as an interesting sequel to the Highland Clearances. First, kick all the locals and their shaggy cattle off the landscape and replace them with sheep (and bracken). Then, later, kick the sheep off and try and wind the clock back. Minus any actual highlanders, obviously.

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I really, really want to re-introduce sabre-toothed tigers into the Thames Valley.

That would be sweet.

And no thread referring to both Pleistocene megafauna and Twickenham would be complete without reference to, that most elegant of creatures, the Saiga Antelope...

2my3h52.jpg

though I suspect some serious back garden pruning would be required to encourage their return.

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That would be sweet.

And no thread referring to both Pleistocene megafauna and Twickenham would be complete without reference to, that most elegant of creatures, the Saiga Antelope...

2my3h52.jpg

though I suspect some serious back garden pruning would be required to encourage their return.

Is that some kind of euphemism?

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That would be sweet.

And no thread referring to both Pleistocene megafauna and Twickenham would be complete without reference to, that most elegant of creatures, the Saiga Antelope...

2my3h52.jpg

though I suspect some serious back garden pruning would be required to encourage their return.

That animal definitely belongs in a punching zoo.

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The narrator, Monbiot, talks like that in real life too - and he has a book out on the topic of rewilding. It's quite a compelling argument with potential to help with flooding, soil erosion etc although not one that has impressed the sheep farmers around here.

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Bird feeder out there, but no birds visiting?

Don't despair!

Try hanging it four feet or more higher. I had no birds, then raised my game (and the feeder) by hanging higher - using a bamboo cane with a hook on the end to place the feeder.

Filled with sunflower kernels (not black husked ones), we've had tits and colonies of goldfinches and greenfinches daily through the winter.

Hang 'em high!

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That animal definitely belongs in a punching zoo.

It's cute! ;)

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... and colonies of goldfinches and greenfinches daily through the winter.

Those are the ones I want next. Shall start experiementing with feed and height. No Osprey or Golden Eagles though, that will really mess things up!

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These days it's nice to hear someone so enthusiastic about something besides X Factor or some other ********

Except the only thing most people get enthusiastic about is going back to the caves.

Reintroduce wolves and bears to London, and I'll start to take them seriously.

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I remember hearing once that the deer started looking unfit and not well. And the wolfs killing off the weak made the deer healthy and fit again. I couldn't help but thinking how unfit and unwell we are getting in the west. So maybe small houses with a fridge next to the sofa is the way to go.

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Are the changes 'better' or just 'different'?

Exactly.

For every mouse and beaver that has come back something else have been pushed out. All that has happened is we have reset things to 70 years ago when the wolves were removed. That wasn't enough time for something else to naturally come in and fill the hole the deer were "naturally" creating.

Things never stay the same for long (on a universal level), if they did it wouldn't be wolves and deer in the video it would be Andrewsarchus and brontotheres or Tyrannosuarus and Edmontosaurus (even they being long and distant cousins of what was there before them).

All man has ever done is accelerate the rate this sort of stuff happens, and also accelerate his own time at the top of the chain.

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