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Saving For a Space Ship

Will The Young & Poor Be Living In Shipping Containers ?

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The Goverment and VI's continue to kick the can down the road, and live in denial of the economic situation, as is their way.

As often discussed on Hpc, it is perhaps only a matter of time before the housing and unemployment benefit /WTC is drastically cut, or collapses along with services like the NHS.

When this happens, there will be little housing benefit money, so the recipients will have to live somewhere else, or homelessness & crime will massively increase.

Will it be one of the cheapest and most secure solutions, of shipping container homes / working premises?

Perhaps some other comparative modular home option like corrugated metal houses or tiny houses http://www.thetinylife.com/what-is-the-tiny-house-movement/

With 25% of unemployed youth still living with parents now, this must put a lot of pressure on parents & infantilize the youth. It will likely get worse.

Putting a modular home in the garden to rent out their room to raise income seems a financially attractive option, giving the youth their own space.

With increasing amounts of people 'getting the fear' about their financial future downsizing to a tiny home is more attractive. Unless workers can reduce their housing expenses, how are they expected to compete globally ?

Recent Container Projects

Elephant and Castle London

http://www.ianthearchitect.org/latest-container-project-elephant-and-castle-london/

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=194198

Edit: http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-12-12/living-steel-box-londoners-live-shipping-containers-due-soaring-rents

Shipping Container Architecture

http://firmitas.org/containers.html

I've been researching containers and tiny homes recently, so provide some links to info sources.

Edit: Great overview / resource (links at bottom of page)

http://www.residentialshippingcontainerprimer.com/what%20is%20RSCP

How get planning permission on non development land

http://www.permaculture.co.uk/articles/how-get-planning-permission-non-development-land

ebook How to Build a Shipping Container House

http://contraders.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/How-to-Build-a-Shipping-Container-House-v1.3-concept.pdf?9d7bd4

Shipping-Container-Architecture-Booklet-pdf

http://www.scribd.com/doc/100148797/Shipping-Container-Architecture-Booklet-pdf

Shipping-Container-Forum

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Shipping-Container-Forum/192951967404523

container home books

http://containerhomebooks.com/

Container home building forum - low use

http://containerist.com/?page_id=431/

shipping-container-homes forum

http://archinect.com/forum/thread/33636/shipping-container-homes

A Shipping Container Home to me is:

1) The possibility to not be shackled to a 20 year mortgage

2) The opportunity to have bungalows in many different location

3) A sens of security that only 3/4 corrugated steel walls can give you

4) The means to live off the grid if I desire

5) A home that I can build incrementally

6) A home that I can build WITHOUT an architect

7) Not a fad, passe, overdone, bla, bla, bla

8) A very real solution to global housing issue

Combine ISBUs with Warehouse space and you get… GOLD!

Containers within commercial sheds

http://www.containerhomeconsultants.com

a-hunting lodge / home-built-from-two-shipping-containers in step by step pics

http://acidcow.com/pics/22326-a-home-built-from-two-shipping-containers-134-pics.html

Possibly the first Shipping Container House in New York BY NORMAN CHAN ON MAY 3, 2013

http://www.tested.com/art/makers/455255-shipping-container-house-new-york/

uk planning permission not normally required

Planning

Generally planning permission is not required for containers but you must make sure with your local authority before proceeding or placing an order.

Recent experience has been that local councils are not really interested in the container itself but rather more in the fee that can be generated from the sometimes unnecessary application!

It is important to be aware that there are many instances where planning is not needed and our advice could save you quite a tidy sum. We are not planning experts, but we can give you help and guidance based on years of experience For instance did you know that containers usually don't need planning permission - because they are classed as temporary structures as they have no concrete floor or footings?

Outbuildings:

Neither Planning Permission or Building Regulation approval is required provided that: Outbuildings do not cover more than half of the area of the garden; not including the area occupied by the house. It is not more than 3m high for a flat roof, or 4m with a ridged roof. No part projects beyond any wall of the house that faces a road. The outbuilding is for use only by those who occupy the house.

A garage is considered to be an extension if it is located within 5m of the original building, so the same rules for planning permission apply. Where it is positioned more than 5m from the existing house, a garage is considered to be as a shed . If a garage adjoins the house, Building Regulations approval is required. A detached garage is exempt from Building Regulations provided: The floor area is less than 30 sq metres. It is more than 1m from a boundary, or it is a single storey and constructed of wholly non-combustible material. It contains no sleeping accommodation.

Factory or warehouse extensions:

You do not normally need planning permission if your extension is: less than 1000 square metres of floor space; and less than 25 per cent of the volume of the original building; and below the height of the original building.

http://www.containerconversions.co.uk/planning.htm

Life in a box with shipping containers

http://www.theownerbuilder.com.au/articles/155%20Container%20housing.pdf

http://www.tinyhousedesign.com/introduction-to-container-homes-buildings/

Insulating containers

http://forums.overclockers.co.uk/showthread.php?t=18240445

free_container_home_floor_plans

http://pesanstiker.info/free_container_home_floor_plans

Floating-homes-being-seriously-considered-at-sites-across-the-uk

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/a-rising-tide-lifts-all-the-houses-floating-homes-being-seriously-considered-at-sites-across-the-uk-8470518.html

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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I've said this before on here but when i spent time in Geneva there was a whole container city on floating pontoons for the low paid workers of the city to live in.

My bro in law who was working at jp morgan showed me these and joked that if i were to move out there that's where i'd be living lol

wont be long before London catches on to floating container cities for the serfs.

Edited by workingpoor

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IT'S THE PRICE OF THE LAND THAT'S THE PROBLEM!

It doesn't have to be like this.

Not if its floating but then i suppose we'll have a mooring fees bubble lol

Or waterbanking by housebuilders lol

Edited by workingpoor

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I've said this before on here but when i spent time in Geneva there was a whole container city on floating pontoons for the low paid workers of the city to live in.

My bro in law who was working at jp morgan showed me these and joked that if i were to move out there that's where i'd be living lol

wont be long before London catches on to floating container cities for the serfs.

The last link I posted shows something similar. Not sure if they're containers, but look modular

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/a-rising-tide-lifts-all-the-houses-floating-homes-being-seriously-considered-at-sites-across-the-uk-8470518.html

IT'S THE PRICE OF THE LAND THAT'S THE PROBLEM!

It doesn't have to be like this.

As times gets harder, it may be easier to rent land from land owners forced to rent it.

The beauty of a container is that you can get it moved elsewhere quickly by a lorry or £2500 for a trailer to carry 20 ft one yourself (still have to crane / winch it on though)

It may be easier that many think, according to info in links below

http://www.tlio.org.uk/chapter7/diy-planning-handbook

http://www.green-shopping.co.uk/grounds-for-hope-ways-to-live-legally-on-cheap-land-in-the-uk.html

http://www.permaculture.co.uk/articles/how-get-planning-permission-non-development-land

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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IT'S THE PRICE OF THE LAND THAT'S THE PROBLEM!

It doesn't have to be like this.

God darn, wheres that +1 button.

Exactly as I was thinking, outside of central London where 5% of people work it's the restrictive planning policy preventing self builders from building their own home cheaply.

Perhaps you could have containers floating on the thames if there really is a housing shortage there.

Selfbuild is where the primary volume of house building should be coming from, but because you are not allowed to build outside of the landbank areas set up by local councils, there is zero chance of self buidlers buying a reasonably priced piece of land to build their cheap accommodation on.

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The last link I posted shows something similar. Not sure if they're containers, but look modular

http://www.independe...uk-8470518.html

As times gets harder, it may be easier to rent land from land owners forced to rent it.

The beauty of a container is that you can get it moved elsewhere quickly by a lorry or £2500 for a trailer to carry 20 ft one yourself (still have to crane / winch it on though)

It may be easier that many think, according to info in links below

http://www.tlio.org....anning-handbook

http://www.green-sho...-in-the-uk.html

http://www.permacult...evelopment-land

Great discoveries, and a credible vision of our Third World future.

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Factory or warehouse extensions:

You do not normally need planning permission if your extension is: less than 1000 square metres of floor space; and less than 25 per cent of the volume of the original building; and below the height of the original building.

http://www.container...uk/planning.htm

Life in a box with shipping containers

http://www.theownerb...r%20housing.pdf

http://www.tinyhouse...omes-buildings/

Insulating containers

http://forums.overcl....php?t=18240445

free_container_home_floor_plans

http://pesanstiker.i...ome_floor_plans

Floating-homes-being-seriously-considered-at-sites-across-the-uk

http://www.independe...uk-8470518.html

Thanks for this. I'm into this! I've lived in a shipping container home in East London for five years. Once you are in them you would think you were in a normal flat.

You might be able to get temporary buildings permission. Also if you can rent buy some commercial land, you can try the planners with some kind of live/work units idea. This is how it worked in East London.

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Guest spp

What do you mean the "poor" you mean hard working families will live in shipping containers the poor will have to make do with tents.

You can get away with living like that over in the U.S or around the med...the U.K on the other hand???

If you own the land who has the right to stop you living on it?

Can you purchase agricultural land, put a few sheep on it, and then claim your state of the art shipping container like building is for supervising them?

Edited by spp

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Thanks for this. I'm into this! I've lived in a shipping container home in East London for five years. Once you are in them you would think you were in a normal flat.

You might be able to get temporary buildings permission. Also if you can rent buy some commercial land, you can try the planners with some kind of live/work units idea. This is how it worked in East London.

What's the sound of rain like when you're in it?

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Thanks for this. I'm into this! I've lived in a shipping container home in East London for five years. Once you are in them you would think you were in a normal flat.

You might be able to get temporary buildings permission. Also if you can rent buy some commercial land, you can try the planners with some kind of live/work units idea. This is how it worked in East London.

:D

Apparently, If you get any 'easy in-easy out' license without any repairing liabilities (not lease) for a hard to let commercial property, the landlord and neighbours will often turn a blind eye to you living there.

This is because you are an unpaid security guard at night, in an environment of increasing crime. You will however have to be discreet & watch H & S as insurance may be invalidated by living there. Of course, you are always busy & working late to neighbours.

Being inside an insulated container, watching noise & light emissions is advisable.

If it doesn't work out, you call in the lorry for your container, to move elsewhere or put into storage.

Removable Insulation on the outside does not restrict space inside as it would if installed on inside.

As times get harder, landlords & councils will have fewer funds available for inspection / enforcement

What do you mean the "poor" you mean hard working families will live in shipping containers the poor will have to make do with tents.

Poor in cars & sub poor in tents then ?

I wonder how US folks survive after benefits are cut off in IIRC... 99 weeks ?

You can get away with living like that over in the U.S or around the med...the U.K on the other hand???

If you own the land who has the right to stop you living on it?

Can you purchase agricultural land, put a few sheep on it, and then claim your state of the art shipping container like building is for supervising them?

You'll find some answers here.

http://www.tlio.org.uk/chapter7/diy-planning-handbook/

But remember that planning officers have every other ruthless capitalist & scammer trying to get planning on land, they are not idiots.

This thread is for people aiming for a low consumption, more sustainable lifestyle, who will contribute to their surroundings, not exploit it.

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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I wouldn't live on water but a safe and secure box to live in, I wouldn't mind.

...that is what most homes are after all, one made of brick, one of metal with extra foam insulation and windows with a view.....on top panels to collect the sun......it is not what it is, what it is called, it is who lives in it and around it that matters most. ;)

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As others have already mentionned, the OP is solving the wrong problem.

We don't need shippping containers - the UK has plenty of land. See for example:

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@52.869504,-0.503067,3a,75y,180h,90t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1si2MR0Ulvi7EIHAN4k2jxew!2e0

I would argue that shipping containers are only required as long as the UK retains its London-centric focus. If London received fewer subsidies [1] then housing pressure on the South-East would be reduced.

[1] e.g. teachers in London get paid more. Why? Do London inhabitants pay higher council tax in counterpart?

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What's the sound of rain like when you're in it?

There was felting above mine, so not so bad, tend to wobble a bit in high wind but that can be mitigated in the way you stack them (I was about four container up. There was even a lift shaft made from upturned containers.

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Great explanation / comparison between passive and active for design decisions

For those considering off grid builds, there are excellent diy videos of the various technologies (solar / reed beds etc)

http://www.youtube.com/user/offthegridbuild/videos

They are veterans of the rammed earth tyre based - Earthship community

Their site http://www.offthegridbuild.com

Other useful rural build links

http://www.eco-hamlets.org.uk/

http://www.communitywoods.org

http://www.forestry.gov.uk/woodlandcrofts

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I'm a bit baffled at why so many see container homes a substandard/inferior to bricks and mortar, if i had a choice between a new build timber frame with a brick skin and a container built one the latter would win hands down

To the OP some great links but alas it still boils down to the same old ... land and planning permission especially the latter as i would put my money on any planning committee looking down on a contaier house as unsuitable

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I'm a bit baffled at why so many see container homes a substandard/inferior to bricks and mortar, if i had a choice between a new build timber frame with a brick skin and a container built one the latter would win hands down

To the OP some great links but alas it still boils down to the same old ... land and planning permission especially the latter as i would put my money on any planning committee looking down on a contaier house as unsuitable

Good post

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I'm a bit baffled at why so many see container homes a substandard/inferior to bricks and mortar, if i had a choice between a new build timber frame with a brick skin and a container built one the latter would win hands down

To the OP some great links but alas it still boils down to the same old ... land and planning permission especially the latter as i would put my money on any planning committee looking down on a contaier house as unsuitable

In green belt or countryside not designated for building yes, otherwise no. Think you have to think laterally. Once again temporary structures (which can last some time), or semi-commercial.

Someone else will be along in a minute to say you won't get planning, when quite obviously you can!

Temporary structures:

http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/general/faq/faqplanpermhome#CanIgetpermissionforatemporarybuilding

The container I lived in was ex industrial complex, with temporary structure permissions.

Edited by aSecureTenant

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So where do these shipping containers go then? we have to place them somewhere. Rents and land values will just keep soaking up the difference until cardboard boxes will be the new low cost alternative to shipping containers.

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In green belt or countryside not designated for building yes, otherwise no. Think you have to think laterally. Once again temporary structures (which can last some time), or semi-commercial.

Someone else will be along in a minute to say you won't get planning, when quite obviously you can!

Temporary structures:

http://www.planningp...mporarybuilding

The container I lived in was ex industrial complex, with temporary structure permissions.

I have had a brief look into the temporary side and in general it seems very temporary in terms of building a home (unles the place has no bed/bathroom) there seems to be some sucsses in building small multi unit complexes like the one below in London docklands but from what i can make out these developments were the creations/initiatives of the local authorities ?

And like you say the greenbelt is a no no and if you were to look at an urban plot it would probably be deemed out of ""character" for the area

Apart from the small holding route or trying to game the system by making the place mobile you would still be relying on the good will of the planning gods, i could see one having a greater chance if you were building something on the grand designs scale but for an average sort of place i think the odds would be against you

Container-Housing-_-London-Docklands.jpg

Edited by long time lurking

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So where do these shipping containers go then? we have to place them somewhere.

Scrap when they come to the end of there lives ,a 40ft container with a high value product inside will probably have no return ticket as the cost of shipping it back to china empty is probably more than the cost to replace it and the cost it in the first place was factored in

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