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Saving For a Space Ship

'those Who Need Charity Shops Most Are Being Priced Out'

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http://www.independent.co.uk/money/spend-save/those-who-need-charity-shops-most-are-being-priced-out-9145439.html

'Those who need charity shops most are being priced out'

A subject often discussed on Amazon sellers forum

https://sellercentral.amazon.co.uk/forums/search.jspa?objID=f1&ref_=xx_sfsrch_conr_sffrm1&q=charity+shops

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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http://www.independe...ut-9145439.html

'Those who need charity shops most are being priced out'

A subject often discussed on Amazon sellers forum

https://sellercentra...q=charity+shops

Don't think those traders have cottoned on to the fact that some charity shops get free oiks from the jobcentre who price and list books etc on Ebay/Amazon competing with what they are doing!

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Puff piece imho. So, charity shops have cottoned on to the fact that some goods can be sold at a premium, but everything else is still pretty cheap, and some Amazon sellers are grumbling that they can no longer pick up the posh stuff at bargain prices and sell them for a nice profit.

Dog bites man?

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With free stock charity shops are always going to be hard to beat.

If they work on shifting stock rather than high prices they might get through 30% the stuff they get given.

They don't though and huge amounts are thrown away.

Can you FOI charities to ask how much stuff they landfill?

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Not always about need.....there are quite a few people, more than many would imagine that choose to shop in a charity shop simply because of the very often good quality items on sale. Well made and makes of clothing, value for money items, goods you can sometimes no longer buy in shopping centre shops the originality of many of the items, if old few would have it or could find it, the uniqueness of the ever changing stock.....you can often find things you never knew you would need and would never find anywhere if you needed or wanted it.....the best thing is unwanted or unfitting items are recycled and given a new life helping good local charities at the same time, also a good place to meet and communicate for local people....some even have a coffee/tea shop...winners all round. :)

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With free stock charity shops are always going to be hard to beat.

If they work on shifting stock rather than high prices they might get through 30% the stuff they get given.

They don't though and huge amounts are thrown away.

Can you FOI charities to ask how much stuff they landfill?

No, only publicly funded organisations are covered by FOI. It doesn't stop you asking though - I imagine most charities would at least attempt to answer the question if coming from a supporter.

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With free stock charity shops are always going to be hard to beat.

If they work on shifting stock rather than high prices they might get through 30% the stuff they get given.

They don't though and huge amounts are thrown away.

Can you FOI charities to ask how much stuff they landfill?

Some people give total rubbish, soild clothing, damp and damaged, mouldy stuff, broken or dangerous rubbish and out of date heavy technical encyclopaedias for example......the charity shops only throw away what people would have or should have thrown away in their own bins or down the local dump.....clothing that no one would wear let alone buy is sold for the good cause by weight and is recycled, not dumped. ;)

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Some people give total rubbish, soild clothing, damp and damaged, mouldy stuff, broken or dangerous rubbish and out of date heavy technical encyclopaedias for example......the charity shops only throw away what people would have or should have thrown away in their own bins or down the local dump.....clothing that no one would wear let alone buy is sold for the good cause by weight and is recycled, not dumped. ;)

You would be surprised what I used to find in the bins of my local charity shops. I once took a car bootful of wearable clothes from their bins to the nearest clothes bank just because I was disgusted by the wastefulness. Made me reluctant to shop there TBH, and I certainly wouldn't donate.

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You would be surprised what I used to find in the bins of my local charity shops. I once took a car bootful of wearable clothes from their bins to the nearest clothes bank just because I was disgusted by the wastefulness. Made me reluctant to shop there TBH, and I certainly wouldn't donate.

Don't know what charity shop that was but of the ones I know of.....all clothes, curtains, material items are never put in the bins they are paid for and collected by a company who will recycle everything.

Good for you finding anything that has been chucked by others who do not value or understand that most things others who have far less than them, can make more valued use out of.....food waste in this country is a national disgrace. ;)

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The woman in the article seems to be under the misapprehension that charity shops are there to provide charity to the people that shop in them. They never have been! They are there to raise money for charity. You can still find bargains, but people who need to save money would be better off going to Primark, or car boot sales and jumble sales in my experience.

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The woman in the article seems to be under the misapprehension that charity shops are there to provide charity to the people that shop in them. They never have been! They are there to raise money for charity. You can still find bargains, but people who need to save money would be better off going to Primark, or car boot sales and jumble sales in my experience.

Why have them in poorer areas then?

Just sell the stuff in posh areas.

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Why have them in poorer areas then?

Just sell the stuff in posh areas.

There are some premium location charity shops, where the 'posh stuff' tends to end up, but most charity shops are chock-full of cheap clothes, furnishing and tableware.

This thread is most peculiar.

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What about the scroungers who visit each and every charity shops/churches/temples daily to get their cash handouts?

Romanians clear the coffers from said charities with military precision I'm told.

But back to it, since when did selling on 'scrap' become problematic in Britain?

If somebody wants to pay new prices for a worn pair of denims, good on the seller for having it on the market.

Perhaps its better to turn the ire to those who've profited from Maggie's right-to-buy charity shop give-away.

STEPTOE-AND-SON-007.jpg

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You would be surprised what I used to find in the bins of my local charity shops. I once took a car bootful of wearable clothes from their bins to the nearest clothes bank just because I was disgusted by the wastefulness. Made me reluctant to shop there TBH, and I certainly wouldn't donate.

I volunteered a few years ago for the British Heart Foundation. Unwanted clothes and books were sold on and not dumped.

Many donations were obviously house clearances from dead relatives which people couldn't be bothered to take to the skip - old stained/dirty/smelly clothes/curtains/bedsheets, broken cups/glasses/plates, cutlery, wallets (sometimes with money and/or personal items) etc - a bit sad really.

The memorable highlights were a gas fire (rejected straight away) and a toilet seat possibly covered in wee, the second toilet seat was dry, luckily.

The good quality stuff was generally bought by the staff at a good discount.

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