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Council Tax Hits Elderly Hardest

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Could this be anything to do with the fact that this government and the Bank of England are screwing over the elderly, since most elderly are savers?

:P

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Well , for a financial institution , Halifax are a bit slow aren't they:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4470908.stm

:blink:

Brown is giving the 'oldies' a £500 rebate this winter - a pre - 'presidential' kickback/bribe in any other country!

That's why it's "All Quiet on the Elderly Front"

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My mother, on basic state pension topped up to £109-ish a week by means testing, qualifies for a huge lump of Council Tax relief as well. In fact this year she's paying none at all... which is rather impressive really (worth about another £85 a month to her). In fact I was rather surprised when she told me.

Ok, it's hardly the life of Riley on £109 a week, but I live comfortably on less than that, so it's not exactly poverty either (not in a *real* sense of the word anyway). Throw in the £200 winter heating allowance and life isn't too bad at the bottom end of the pension heap. Hardly luxurious, but then that's not what the State pension's for IMO.

The trouble is probably for those folk with small private pensions and/or a "reasonable" lump in the bank. While the new benefits are more flexible, with tapered means tested relief, it's no doubt possible to have far more in the way of assets than my mother, yet still be no better off.

So in that sense there will be pain. But then perhaps it just reflects the fact that the basic, "safety net" pension is doing a good job. Having said that, the paperwork involved in chasing the various benefits can be quite daunting. But then that's Nu Labour for you; so busy trying to be totally fair, they probably spend more administering things than it'd cost to just give everyone over 65, say, £130 a week with no extra benefits whatsoever.

Messy stuff pensions. And it's going to get a lot messier. Which is why I try to keep my expectations to an absolute minimum. It'll save a lot of disappointment in the long run.

Andrew McP

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yup up the pension and remove all the paperwork and thus save on collecting and form writing and thus sack 1000s of council workers.

realy the real people suffering with council tax are the millions on minimum wage or just above it, there also the ones needing to pay rent.pensioners even the poorest pensioners on the whole are better off than these millions of workers.

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yup up the pension and remove all the paperwork and thus save on collecting and form writing and thus sack 1000s of council workers.

realy the real people suffering with council tax are the millions on minimum wage or just above it, there also the ones needing to pay rent.pensioners even the poorest pensioners on the whole are better off than these millions of workers.

Which is why a few million of those workers chose benefits instead of working, they are better off!

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My Father in law keeps most of his savings out of the banks and building societies as he knows that the government will eventually take it off him otherwise.

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realy the real people suffering with council tax are the millions on minimum wage or just above it, there also the ones needing to pay rent.pensioners even the poorest pensioners on the whole are better off than these millions of workers.

Well, to be honest a lot of the people I work with (in a supermarket) are close to minimum wage and the benefit system is currently quite good to them too. Though, there again, we all know the huge problems there are with the complexities of the tax credit system and its potential for over-payment.

I know one man who actually saves most of his tax credit money until his next assessment just in case some of it needs to be paid back. Very sensible chap, and here again it perhaps illustrates that -- for folk not inclined to fritter away their wage on life's optional extras -- the definitions of "poverty" are set quite comfortably.

But then that's why the tax credit system is perhaps such a mess. And of course it's important to remember that that whole point of this system is to encourage people off the dole & sickness benefits. Whether it's any cheaper for the nation overall is debatable, but it must be better for society that people are subsidised to do something productive rather than to be sat at home watching This Morning.

Andrew McP

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Well, to be honest a lot of the people I work with (in a supermarket) are close to minimum wage and the benefit system is currently quite good to them too. Though, there again, we all know the huge problems there are with the complexities of the tax credit system and its potential for over-payment.

I know one man who actually saves most of his tax credit money until his next assessment just in case some of it needs to be paid back. Very sensible chap, and here again it perhaps illustrates that -- for folk not inclined to fritter away their wage on life's optional extras -- the definitions of "poverty" are set quite comfortably.

But then that's why the tax credit system is perhaps such a mess. And of course it's important to remember that that whole point of this system is to encourage people off the dole & sickness benefits. Whether it's any cheaper for the nation overall is debatable, but it must be better for society that people are subsidised to do something productive rather than to be sat at home watching This Morning.

Andrew McP

People with no children dont get tax credits

this is the vast majority of young working people.

my first post stand true

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People with no children dont get tax credits

this is the vast majority of young working people.

my first post stand true

Yes they do.

They don't get child tax credits though.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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