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Has anyone here studied with the Open University?

Would you recommend it?

I've seen a fair few posts on here saying they'd recommend not going to Uni these days because of the debt but I'm stuck in a bit of a dead end job and want to move on to something with prospects.

Also I've noticed it's cheaper in Wales or Scotland - between £1510 - £2815 based on 120 credits (total cost £4530 - £8445).

In England it's £5,124 per 120 credits (total cost £15,372).

Do you reckon I'd get away with using a PO box? Seems daft to be penalised for living in England.

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Has anyone here studied with the Open University?

Would you recommend it?

I've seen a fair few posts on here saying they'd recommend not going to Uni these days because of the debt but I'm stuck in a bit of a dead end job and want to move on to something with prospects.

Also I've noticed it's cheaper in Wales or Scotland - between £1510 - £2815 based on 120 credits (total cost £4530 - £8445).

In England it's £5,124 per 120 credits (total cost £15,372).

Do you reckon I'd get away with using a PO box? Seems daft to be penalised for living in England.

I'm currently studying with them for a maths degree - should be finished next year or the year after. Their study materials are excellent, but the support is not what it used to be - the days of residential weeks or well-organised tutorials are gone, although there is tutor support online if you need it and the occasional physical tutorial if you can travel.

When I joined the costs were pretty low (and still are for those of us finishing off), but the LibCons have put the OU under the same funding mechanism as all of the other universities - costs have tripled and most new students are on the loan system. Having said that, it's still the cheapest option for an accredited degree.

If you want to get the Scottish lower rates then I think you have to prove residency - tenancy agreement, mortgage agreement, that kind of thing. I imagine it's quite tricky to pull the wool over their eyes.

I think it boils down to whether you need a certificated qualification at the end of it. If you do then they're the cheapest option while still being good quality and (importantly) have a good reputation with employers. If you don't, there are hundreds of free online courses, MOOCs and the like which you can put on your CV to show you've studied but without the degree certificate. See Coursera, FutureLearn, http://www.mooc-list.com/ etc.

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Thanks for the reply!

I'm looking at qualifications to enable me to get a proper job - I presumed these days it would mean going for an accredited degree. However if there are free resources available I'll see what they have to offer before I take the plunge. :)

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Check to see what your local unis offer too.

In my case, the local uni offered a mainly distance learning course with the option to go along for a face to face tutorial. Best of both worlds.

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I'm currently studying with them for a maths degree - should be finished next year or the year after. Their study materials are excellent, but the support is not what it used to be - the days of residential weeks or well-organised tutorials are gone, although there is tutor support online if you need it and the occasional physical tutorial if you can travel.

When I joined the costs were pretty low (and still are for those of us finishing off), but the LibCons have put the OU under the same funding mechanism as all of the other universities - costs have tripled and most new students are on the loan system. Having said that, it's still the cheapest option for an accredited degree.

If you want to get the Scottish lower rates then I think you have to prove residency - tenancy agreement, mortgage agreement, that kind of thing. I imagine it's quite tricky to pull the wool over their eyes.

I think it boils down to whether you need a certificated qualification at the end of it. If you do then they're the cheapest option while still being good quality and (importantly) have a good reputation with employers. If you don't, there are hundreds of free online courses, MOOCs and the like which you can put on your CV to show you've studied but without the degree certificate. See Coursera, FutureLearn, http://www.mooc-list.com/ etc.

That mooc website looks very interesting...cheers!

I'm currently doing an open degree with the OU at the mo...computing & finance in the main....You need to work out how much free time you have too...60 points a year (so your degree takes 6 years), and you could easily do 25 hours a week, perhaps a lot more when reaching TMAs and EMAs deadlines...

You can do distance learning degrees through the university of london for around £5k.. http://www.londoninternational.ac.uk/

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Has anyone here studied with the Open University?

Would you recommend it?

I've seen a fair few posts on here saying they'd recommend not going to Uni these days because of the debt but I'm stuck in a bit of a dead end job and want to move on to something with prospects.

Also I've noticed it's cheaper in Wales or Scotland - between £1510 - £2815 based on 120 credits (total cost £4530 - £8445).

In England it's £5,124 per 120 credits (total cost £15,372).

Do you reckon I'd get away with using a PO box? Seems daft to be penalised for living in England.

Yeah, last course I did was 2007. I was working towards a physics degree. I had to stop in my third year as working full time, a young family and a tough subject got the better of me. I really enjoyed it, but chose a difficult subject and underestimated the hours I needed to put in, in fact their own guide is a bit optimistic on the hours involved. I do wonder HTF kids at conventional uni manage to get anything achieved. I suspect today's uni is little more than a diploma mill business.

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I did an assorted arts degree, largely classical studies and Eng lit. But it was for my own interest, not really for work. Apart from one of the very first courses, which I thought a complete waffly waste of time, I was very impressed with all the others - very good course materials and mostly v interesting.

My brother has done various maths and science courses, usually at a high level - they helped him career wise. But he went on to do Astronomy,, purely because he was interested. The OU can become addictive, though I'm sure less so now that fees have gone up so much.

I would say go for it - but be aware that you need to give a lot of time to it, particularly when assignments are due.

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Has anyone here studied with the Open University?

Would you recommend it?

I've seen a fair few posts on here saying they'd recommend not going to Uni these days because of the debt but I'm stuck in a bit of a dead end job and want to move on to something with prospects.

Also I've noticed it's cheaper in Wales or Scotland - between £1510 - £2815 based on 120 credits (total cost £4530 - £8445).

In England it's £5,124 per 120 credits (total cost £15,372).

Do you reckon I'd get away with using a PO box? Seems daft to be penalised for living in England.

Depends what you want to get into and what you define as a "proper" job.

Few of the guys I did physics with at Uni ended up in a physics or science related job. On the other hand non of them I have spoken to recently have regretted doing it.

Maybe if you state what you are interested in there will be someone on here who can offer first hand career advice.

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Depends what you want to get into and what you define as a "proper" job.

Few of the guys I did physics with at Uni ended up in a physics or science related job. On the other hand non of them I have spoken to recently have regretted doing it.

Maybe if you state what you are interested in there will be someone on here who can offer first hand career advice.

Thanks for the input everyone. By the "proper job" comment I meant something challenging and with prospects i.e. not like my current one in the civil service. I've been temporarily promoted before and when I asked my new manager about applying for other posts on promotion his response was long the lines of "you're only 26, you've got another 40 years or so to work your way up". <_<

Unfortunately I'm crap at maths which rules out a lot of subjects I'm interested in, so I've been looking at business management and stuff like that. There's a free course on Saylor.org which I've decided to give a try, just to get a feel for it. I'm also quite interested in economics which is covered in the introduction so it should be easy to get into.

I suspect today's uni is little more than a diploma mill business.

Yeah I feel the same way about it. Unfortunately in my experience it's also a bit like a clique and if you haven't got a degree you're excluded from a lot of things. People seem to think there's something wrong you. Sad but true (in my experience).

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Thanks for the input everyone. By the "proper job" comment I meant something challenging and with prospects i.e. not like my current one in the civil service. I've been temporarily promoted before and when I asked my new manager about applying for other posts on promotion his response was long the lines of "you're only 26, you've got another 40 years or so to work your way up". <_<

Unfortunately I'm crap at maths which rules out a lot of subjects I'm interested in, so I've been looking at business management and stuff like that. There's a free course on Saylor.org which I've decided to give a try, just to get a feel for it. I'm also quite interested in economics which is covered in the introduction so it should be easy to get into.

Yeah I feel the same way about it. Unfortunately in my experience it's also a bit like a clique and if you haven't got a degree you're excluded from a lot of things. People seem to think there's something wrong you. Sad but true (in my experience).

Sounds like you are exactly the sort of person who needs to be very careful about what they choose.

Can't offer any real advice. If you were thinking of doing STEM type work, then a good degree from a good ! university would help a lot in the job prospects. STEM subjects are also good for accountancy and IT, as if you can pass a degree in those subjects then generally you have proven you have enough raw brainpower make a contribution (of course it does not always work in practice, but is generally true).

I think for me OU would not work. Cost too much and I would have difficulty getting focus while still at work. Full time stuff would be the only solution for me. Maybe you can find some sponsorship. You say you have not had much chance of promotion, but have you tried getting them to cough up for training ?

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I know several people who did "Open University", when it was cheaper. I used to like watching hard maths lectures at 3 AM. They don't do that now on BBC2.

If I were in the position of interviewing someone, I would be rather impressed with an OU degree!

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I know several people who did "Open University", when it was cheaper. I used to like watching hard maths lectures at 3 AM. They don't do that now on BBC2.

If I were in the position of interviewing someone, I would be rather impressed with an OU degree!

If you notice, a lot of the mainstream science programmes on the BBC, are in conjunction with the OU...

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