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More Possible Job Losses

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900 jobs likely to go at a sandwich maker in corby to go also according to bbc

You mean people might have to make their own sandwiches? :o:o:o:o

Maybe sanity is returning...

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Both the cake company and the sandwich company are part of the 2 Sisters Food Group. They have been struggling after a few years of rapid expansion. We'll be hearing more about them in the near future methinks.

Do you think the brands they have purchased from premier food are loss making and will close soon.

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Slightly OT, but this video typifies to me why the days of a 'job' are doomed:

EDIT - don't give up on it till you've seen what happens at 1m13s....

Edited by weaker

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I was driving down the M6 from Liverpool (on my way back from Ireland) and noticed the thousands and thousands of lorry drivers who would be made redundant in the next 10 years as lorys drive themselves.

Spoke to a few of them on the ferry, nice chaps around 55 to 60 with little other job prospects - usually have a good life story to tell.

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Slightly OT, but this video typifies to me why the days of a 'job' are doomed:

EDIT - don't give up on it till you've seen what happens at 1m13s....

Automated pallet putaway solutions have been around for a long time. SSI Schafer is one of the most cutting edge companies for warehouse automation and there's some incredible stuff. Where it falls down is you have got to be very strict in ensuring suppliers adhere to keeping goods within pallet edges etc. Another issue is the capital investment, as an example, you spend a fortune building a highly automated picking warehouse that collates orders consisting of several items. Then suddenly the consumer trend moves to small or even single item orders and your stuffed. Or a parcel company gives a very sharp rate for cartons of a certain size. You adapt your warehouse then find they change this. It seems very unlikely at the moment but, with this example, you could get caught by wooden pallets becoming obsolete. Things change very fast now.

These videos are definitely worth a watch for anyone who thinks automation will create as many jobs as it destroys.

I was driving down the M6 from Liverpool (on my way back from Ireland) and noticed the thousands and thousands of lorry drivers who would be made redundant in the next 10 years as lorys drive themselves.

Spoke to a few of them on the ferry, nice chaps around 55 to 60 with little other job prospects - usually have a good life story to tell.

I think it's ok for a good while. They haven't even managed to automate trailer hitching, for lorries, yet. It's certainly at higher risk with the High St dying and it increasingly moves to motorway trunking. Although I have my doubts that regional distribution centres are they way the trend is going long term.

Edited by SNACR

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I was driving down the M6 from Liverpool (on my way back from Ireland) and noticed the thousands and thousands of lorry drivers who would be made redundant in the next 10 years as lorys drive themselves.

Spoke to a few of them on the ferry, nice chaps around 55 to 60 with little other job prospects - usually have a good life story to tell.

The plan is that they will all jump into the nano tech industry or some other high tech sector- sure a couple weeks training might be needed in few odd cases but I have no doubt it will be a near seamless transition from driving trucks to manipulating matter at a subatomic level- at least that's the theory. :D

I came across this yogi bera quote recently;

In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is.

Do they teach this in Economists school? :lol:

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I was driving down the M6 from Liverpool (on my way back from Ireland) and noticed the thousands and thousands of lorry drivers who would be made redundant in the next 10 years as lorys drive themselves.

Spoke to a few of them on the ferry, nice chaps around 55 to 60 with little other job prospects - usually have a good life story to tell.

10 years seems pretty soon. Not sure if public would like the idea of thousands of massive vehicles on the motorways and roads hurtling along unmanned. I doubt we will have an automated airforce in 10 years time.

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Do you think the brands they have purchased from premier food are loss making and will close soon.

After all the debt driven expansion, Ranjit is sweating the assets hard to generate cash. His Worksop site had to close for several days last year allegedly because of cumulative lack of investment and poor hygiene issues. A number of his customers are unhappy....

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This is just one site which encompasses 650 jobs. Presumably each supermarket contract will account for roughly the same number but at various sites around the country. That's a lot of employment dependant on the population being able to afford to be lazy with their food.

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This is just one site which encompasses 650 jobs. Presumably each supermarket contract will account for roughly the same number but at various sites around the country. That's a lot of employment dependant on the population being able to afford to be lazy with their food.

Back in 2008 the Wail was doing all sorts of articles about how to save money on your food shop and making your lunch at home. However, the modern household is too small to shop effectively. If most people buy a head of lettuce, half of it will go in the bin unused. People, sorry consumers, are used to variety in their diet and they won't eat the same meal for several consecutive days. Most households are limited in the range of meals they're capable of cooking. This makes them inefficient in their use of ingredients.

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10 years seems pretty soon. Not sure if public would like the idea of thousands of massive vehicles on the motorways and roads hurtling along unmanned. I doubt we will have an automated airforce in 10 years time.

Still think there will be a requirement to have a human on board, then can eat, drink, text, update twitter and use a laptop, whilst on the move, pretty much what they do now. :lol:

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1391852706[/url]' post='1102463731']

Back in 2008 the Wail was doing all sorts of articles about how to save money on your food shop and making your lunch at home. However, the modern household is too small to shop effectively. If most people buy a head of lettuce, half of it will go in the bin unused. People, sorry consumers, are used to variety in their diet and they won't eat the same meal for several consecutive days. Most households are limited in the range of meals they're capable of cooking. This makes them inefficient in their use of ingredients.

Taking into account the waste, would it still be cheaper in the long run to produce their own meals/lunches? In order to cut down on waste & limited cooking ability, would they focus on simpler meals? Thinking back to my single days, my lunches consisted of tunafish or cheese & ham sandwiches. My main meals were also simple & repetitious but focused on things I liked, so I didn't seem to mind.

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Taking into account the waste, would it still be cheaper in the long run to produce their own meals/lunches? In order to cut down on waste & limited cooking ability, would they focus on simpler meals? Thinking back to my single days, my lunches consisted of tunafish or cheese & ham sandwiches. My main meals were also simple & repetitious but focused on things I liked, so I didn't seem to mind.

It's possible that it would be cheaper if you were organised, and disciplined. People do it when they have a goal in mind. Whether Joe Average would be willing to do it on an on-going basis is unlikely.

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That is a really good point I hadn't thought about.

The effect of smaller households on the sheer amount of food we throw away each week. And how therefore buying prepared/processed food becomes more sensible.

People may also literally be getting fatter because we are living in homes with fewer people.

In larger families, eating can be a social occasion. All too often it's either a form of 'mood management' (comfort eating etc) , or it's consumed (shovelled in) in front of the prole feed box.

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Back in 2008 the Wail was doing all sorts of articles about how to save money on your food shop and making your lunch at home. However, the modern household is too small to shop effectively. If most people buy a head of lettuce, half of it will go in the bin unused. People, sorry consumers, are used to variety in their diet and they won't eat the same meal for several consecutive days. Most households are limited in the range of meals they're capable of cooking. This makes them inefficient in their use of ingredients.

.....a few salad leaves can be grown in a seed tray on a windowsill, cut and come again.....

Yes....fewer households now have a conventional oven large enough to cook in bulk and freeze some portions, little cupboard space and no room for a freezer, imo far more beneficial than a dish washer that requires expensive washing soaps...........saving money means, planning ahead for meals and shopping for the week, no waste of any food whatsoever, cooking in bulk either on top of the stove in a large pan....the larger the pan the more money saved in fuel and food,,,,also trying your hand in growing more food, dig up the grass, this may or may not save money depending, but it will taste far nicer and is good for you......time will save money......you either spend time earning it or saving it. ;)

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Automated pallet putaway solutions have been around for a long time. SSI Schafer is one of the most cutting edge companies for warehouse automation and there's some incredible stuff. Where it falls down is you have got to be very strict in ensuring suppliers adhere to keeping goods within pallet edges etc. Another issue is the capital investment, as an example, you spend a fortune building a highly automated picking warehouse that collates orders consisting of several items. Then suddenly the consumer trend moves to small or even single item orders and your stuffed. Or a parcel company gives a very sharp rate for cartons of a certain size. You adapt your warehouse then find they change this. It seems very unlikely at the moment but, with this example, you could get caught by wooden pallets becoming obsolete. Things change very fast now.

These videos are definitely worth a watch for anyone who thinks automation will create as many jobs as it destroys.

I think it's ok for a good while. They haven't even managed to automate trailer hitching, for lorries, yet. It's certainly at higher risk with the High St dying and it increasingly moves to motorway trunking. Although I have my doubts that regional distribution centres are they way the trend is going long term.

Odd that..pallets in, pallets out....why not just deliver them and cut out the warehouse?...use the clever software to coordinate the lorries.

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