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Marriage 'stronger Than For A Generation' Despite Increase In Divorces

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/sex/divorce/10622297/Marriage-stronger-than-for-a-generation-despite-increase-in-divorces.html

Marriage in Britain is stronger than it has been for a generation despite a small rise in the number of divorces in the wake of recession, official figures suggest.

According to the Office for National Statistics the divorce rate in England and Wales is almost 20 per cent lower than it was a decade ago.

Meanwhile the number of marriages failing within the first 10 years is at its lowest point since the generation of couples who married during the miners’ strike.

The trend towards more stable marriages is being driven by younger people, with the divorce rates falling in all age groups up to 50 for men and 45 for women.

By contrast so-called “silver splitter” separations continue to surge, with the number of people over 60 heading to the divorce courts up three per cent in a single year and 45 per cent in a decade.

Newly weds can't afford to get divorced, but the silver haired generations can cash out and move out?

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The trend towards more stable marriages is being driven by younger people, with the divorce rates falling in all age groups up to 50 for men and 45 for women.

By contrast so-called “silver splitter” separations continue to surge, with the number of people over 60 heading to the divorce courts up three per cent in a single year and 45 per cent in a decade.

Young people can't afford to live apart, old people can.

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I was talking to an EA a few weeks ago - yeah, I can't believe that either - who was telling me that half of his valuations are to divorcing couples.

He said that always one half of the couple wanted a silly high valuation simply to stop the divorce progressing because the house could never be sold at the valuation.

He also pointed out numerous properties on his books that were houses been sold by divorcing couples who wanted well above what he thought the houses were worth - his firm now apparently refuses to bring on houses from divorcing couples unless they bring it on at the firm's valuation and not the couples.

If this is going on across the country then it would imply a vast build-up of couples in the process of divorce but for whom the divorces will never finalise until the house sells. If the divorce is in progress but not finalised then it is not showing up in the divorce stats.

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...not according to this news item:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-26070256

Divorce rate up 'because of recession', report says

The divorce rate in England and Wales has gone up, possibly because of the last recession, according to a report.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) said there were 118,140 divorces in 2012, up 0.5% on 2011.

Between 2003 and 2009 there was a general downward trend in the number of divorces, but in 2010 they rose 4.9%.

"One theory suggests recession could contribute to a rise in partnership break-ups because of increased financial strain," the report says.

The ONS said there were approximately 13 divorces an hour granted in England and Wales in 2012. Almost half occurred in the first 10 years of marriage.

The report said: "Recent trends could be consistent with the theory that recession is associated with an increased risk of divorce, but with a delayed impact.

BBC this morning said it was because now the financial crisis is over and people have more job security, they can afford to break up.

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It's funny isn't it because when the vow "in richer and poorer, in sickness and in health", you always imagine the 'poorer' and the 'sickness' bits to be the pinch point in a relationship.

Not that now I'm richer I can get shot of you.

Or possibly "now that you're richer, I don't need to worry about supporting you any more / reduced alimony"

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I was talking to an EA a few weeks ago - yeah, I can't believe that either - who was telling me that half of his valuations are to divorcing couples.

He said that always one half of the couple wanted a silly high valuation simply to stop the divorce progressing because the house could never be sold at the valuation.

He also pointed out numerous properties on his books that were houses been sold by divorcing couples who wanted well above what he thought the houses were worth - his firm now apparently refuses to bring on houses from divorcing couples unless they bring it on at the firm's valuation and not the couples.

If this is going on across the country then it would imply a vast build-up of couples in the process of divorce but for whom the divorces will never finalise until the house sells. If the divorce is in progress but not finalised then it is not showing up in the divorce stats.

Valid points....reminded me of someone I know who was buying a house, offer accepted, spent money on valuations, conveyancing etc, almost ready to exchange when one party suddenly decided they didn't want to sell, while the other not living there did......getting involved in their marital dispute cost them lots in both wasted time and money.....best avoided, wise to find out first the full personal circumstances of the vendor/s why they are selling? do they have something they can buy? ;)

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The people with previously high divorce rates never bother getting married in the first place nowadays.

....nowadays it is not 'marriage' it is any relationship with or without kids......to sell all adults living in 'their home' have to sign a legal agreement to sell before a sale. ;)

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It's funny isn't it because when the vow "in richer and poorer, in sickness and in health", you always imagine the 'poorer' and the 'sickness' bits to be the pinch point in a relationship.

Not that now I'm richer I can get shot of you.

But now you can afford to "upgrade"!

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Valid points....reminded me of someone I know who was buying a house, offer accepted, spent money on valuations, conveyancing etc, almost ready to exchange when one party suddenly decided they didn't want to sell, while the other not living there did......getting involved in their marital dispute cost them lots in both wasted time and money.....best avoided, wise to find out first the full personal circumstances of the vendor/s why they are selling? do they have something they can buy? ;)

According to the EA I talked to this is very common. If I ever show interest in a house now I ask who is selling it and why. Over the years I have heard countless stories of innocent buyers wasting money on valuations, surveys, solicitors, etc, only to discover that one half of a divorcing couple has no intention of selling.

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According to the EA I talked to this is very common. If I ever show interest in a house now I ask who is selling it and why. Over the years I have heard countless stories of innocent buyers wasting money on valuations, surveys, solicitors, etc, only to discover that one half of a divorcing couple has no intention of selling.

Motivated sellers are always a good thing when buying!

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