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swissy_fit

Apple Imac 21.5" Hard Disk Failure - What Now?

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One for the techies....

I checked on the net and it appears that if you are unfortunate enough to have one of the IMacs that suffers hard disk failure, it will probably do it again.

Can't be bothered doing it myself which would be cheapest of course, so am going to pay a techie lad to do it.

Can I have an SSD put in instead, and will that help regarding prevention of another failure?

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I've heard that SSD fail 'ungracefully' - so a backup strategy is more important. I use a NAS on the home network which autosyncs.

I heard SSDs fail to read only. No idea if it's true, or whether it depends on the type in use...

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I heard SSDs fail to read only. No idea if it's true, or whether it depends on the type in use...

I think failing to read data is a major fecking problem, to put it mildly! :P

I'm tempted to try a SSD/HDD hybrid to see if there is a big difference.

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No opinion about the mac, but all our home PCs have SSD drives now. They boot faster, never seem to make the PCs chug or stutter, no failures yet. We have a mix of Win7, Vista64b and XP. I also used an SSD on my sons PS3.

I've heard that SSD fail 'ungracefully' - so a backup strategy is more important. I use a NAS on the home network which autosyncs.

I should imagine the SSD is more vulnerable to an overvoltage failure than a rotating disk drive...the overvoltage or spike could erase and damage the memory lattice, whereas the disc in a hard Disk is a separate magnetic medium...

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One for the techies....

I checked on the net and it appears that if you are unfortunate enough to have one of the IMacs that suffers hard disk failure, it will probably do it again.

Can't be bothered doing it myself which would be cheapest of course, so am going to pay a techie lad to do it.

Can I have an SSD put in instead, and will that help regarding prevention of another failure?

I'm guessing a replacement won't be cheap as you'll be paying the mac premium.

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Have you checked with Apple. They are usually very good at doing repairs on out of warranty errors where the problem is known and common...

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Have you checked with Apple. They are usually very good at doing repairs on out of warranty errors where the problem is known and common...

They might be in the UK or the US, but I doubt very much if they will be helpful in Geneva. I might try though, it's worth a shot.

Francophone customer service is generally awful, the idea that the feelings of the customer are an issue just doesn't occur to them, in their minds they're doing you a favour by allowing you to pay for something, be it a product or a service, that comes from their marvellous selves.

I've been here quite a while now, so long that it didn't even occur to me to ask them.......

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One for the techies....

I checked on the net and it appears that if you are unfortunate enough to have one of the IMacs that suffers hard disk failure, it will probably do it again.

Can't be bothered doing it myself which would be cheapest of course, so am going to pay a techie lad to do it.

Can I have an SSD put in instead, and will that help regarding prevention of another failure?

So far as I understand, it depends on age and spec of your iMac as to whether an SDD can be fitted but there is a comprehensive guide to what’s possible here.

If your iMac is an early 2011 version then this might be of interest …

HTH

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Why are we all having disk failures? :blink::ph34r:

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So far as I understand, it depends on age and spec of your iMac as to whether an SDD can be fitted but there is a comprehensive guide to what’s possible here.

If your iMac is an early 2011 version then this might be of interest …

HTH

Thanks - unfortunately it's not one of those Seagate 1TB drives.

Reading that everymac link I'm not optimistic that this can be done by Joe Bloggs, so either I pay Apple to fix it or I bin it....

:angry:

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Apparently not if you read that everymac link posted by Boomer Baby.

Ifixit is the resource I always use, an example for an iMac HD replacement is here

Looks like a regular HD will do in this iMac model at lease, but I may be wrong

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Ifixit is the resource I always use, an example for an iMac HD replacement is here

Looks like a regular HD will do in this iMac model at lease, but I may be wrong

It depends on the exact spec of the machine.

While straightforward to replace drives in most Macs (and no Mac premium!), some require a replacement thermal sensor cable to prevent the fans spinning up for no apparent reason.

OWC are usually very good on advice and kit for replacement Mac drives but it's worth taking a look at Crucial who are advertising a 240 GB SSD for the Mid 2011 iMac 21.5-inch at £100 and which they claim to be fully functional.

Worth checking the precise spec of your machine on their website perhaps?

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A HD is a HD is a HD, just get one from ebuyer and bung it in.

All hard disks are not equal. Remember the IBM "Death Star"?

No opinion about the mac, but all our home PCs have SSD drives now. They boot faster, never seem to make the PCs chug or stutter, no failures yet. We have a mix of Win7, Vista64b and XP. I also used an SSD on my sons PS3.

I've heard that SSD fail 'ungracefully' - so a backup strategy is more important. I use a NAS on the home network which autosyncs.

I've used SSDs for over five years, but, the one failure I've had was instantaneous and catastrophic, unlike a mechanical disk that often gives some warning.

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I've just ordered the bits for my first self-build PC, and I've gone for two drives: a 64GB SSD and a 1TB regular drive. My plan is to put the OS and other software on the SSD for fast boots and program loading while keeping all the data on the regular drive. That way, a catastrophic SSD failure will at least just take out the software and hopefully leave my valuable data intact on the other drive.

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I think failing to read data is a major fecking problem, to put it mildly! :P

"Fail to read only" is a bit ambiguous. Does (s)he mean that it fails such that data can only be read from it, not written to it, or the other way around (it will accept an attempt to save a file onto it, but not to read it back again)?

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"Fail to read only" is a bit ambiguous. Does (s)he mean that it fails such that data can only be read from it, not written to it, or the other way around (it will accept an attempt to save a file onto it, but not to read it back again)?

If you're lucky, yes, it will be seen as read-only by the operating system and the files will still be there; that normally seems to happen if the drive runs out of blocks it can still write to (since they only have a limited number of writes before they fail). More commonly, SSDs just die completely due to a firmware bug of some kind, and nothing is readable.

In normal use, you'll never hit the first case on a decently sized drive; the 240GB SSD in my laptop has used about 0.15% of its write cycles in the year since I bought it.

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Why don't you post on glocals to see if anyone can help with a good tech?

I had a friend who bought a Mac desktop from the center in Geneva and the motherboard blew a week after the warranty expired and they agreed, after much arguing, to cover it. Under EU law (but not Swiss law) even the 1 year warranty is not an absolute, for big ticket items they may have to cover for longer

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I haven't seen a 21.5 inch disk drive since 1977! :blink:

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I haven't seen a 21.5 inch disk drive since 1977! :blink:

:)

Pinny works in IT or proofreading I reckon.

The hardest thing about fitting the small SSD was that an adapter was required to make it fit in the space where the original hard drive had been. The bloke took photos of each stage, it was mildly interesting, but I'm still glad I didn't spend an entire weekend doing it myself.

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I've just ordered the bits for my first self-build PC, and I've gone for two drives: a 64GB SSD and a 1TB regular drive. My plan is to put the OS and other software on the SSD for fast boots and program loading while keeping all the data on the regular drive. That way, a catastrophic SSD failure will at least just take out the software and hopefully leave my valuable data intact on the other drive.

Just replaced a failed HDD with an SSD in my fairly high spec laptop and it's made a huge improvement in speed but also in battery life and quietness.

One cause for concern is that the configuration software the SSD came with turned off Windows Index service (and some other things) to help extend the life of the SSD. I tried setting things up so the laptop would write the index to another drive, but Windows won't allow the index to be placed on an external drive (even a micro SD card).

I've read conflicting articles about whether this is really an issue to worry about with modern SSDs so in the end I compromised by turning the indexing service back on, but severely limiting the folders and file types indexed.

If I were buying another I'd go with a hybrid so all the OS and applications can go on the SSD part and files, indexes etc on the mechanical part.

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