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Jason

What Notice Period Would You Want As An Employee?

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Hey all, just after some HPC advice.

I found out not so long ago my boss (company owner) has decided he isn't going to sell the business. Which is all nice and dandy, but I never knew he was thinking about it in the first place. Which has really made me think about my notice period, which is currently 1month on either side, and is it long enough? The company is a reasonable size, very successfully, and probably worth £10m or so (and has no debt).

If it were to be bought out, it would most likely be swallowed up by a far bigger competitor who would eventually get rid of us all, to bring things 'in house'.

I'm now thinking of asking for a three month notice period. I know if it were to change it would have to be on both sides, so I won't get away with 3months from the employer, but stay at 1month from me.

So (for those who are an employee), what is your notice period? What's the norm? Would you want a longer notice period?

My worry is I won't be able to find another job very quickly, specially not as the same wage level I am currently at.

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Hey all, just after some HPC advice.

I found out not so long ago my boss (company owner) has decided he isn't going to sell the business. Which is all nice and dandy, but I never knew he was thinking about it in the first place. Which has really made me think about my notice period, which is currently 1month on either side, and is it long enough? The company is a reasonable size, very successfully, and probably worth £10m or so (and has no debt).

If it were to be bought out, it would most likely be swallowed up by a far bigger competitor who would eventually get rid of us all, to bring things 'in house'.

I'm now thinking of asking for a three month notice period. I know if it were to change it would have to be on both sides, so I won't get away with 3months from the employer, but stay at 1month from me.

So (for those who are an employee), what is your notice period? What's the norm? Would you want a longer notice period?

My worry is I won't be able to find another job very quickly, specially not as the same wage level I am currently at.

I would rather have no notice period. Just told on a Friday don't bother coming in on the Monday. Working out your notice period is soul destroying.

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Hey all, just after some HPC advice.

I found out not so long ago my boss (company owner) has decided he isn't going to sell the business. Which is all nice and dandy, but I never knew he was thinking about it in the first place. Which has really made me think about my notice period, which is currently 1month on either side, and is it long enough? The company is a reasonable size, very successfully, and probably worth £10m or so (and has no debt).

If it were to be bought out, it would most likely be swallowed up by a far bigger competitor who would eventually get rid of us all, to bring things 'in house'.

I'm now thinking of asking for a three month notice period. I know if it were to change it would have to be on both sides, so I won't get away with 3months from the employer, but stay at 1month from me.

So (for those who are an employee), what is your notice period? What's the norm? Would you want a longer notice period?

My worry is I won't be able to find another job very quickly, specially not as the same wage level I am currently at.

Does it really matter ?

If an employer didn't want me I wouldn't want to work for them, so a notice period doesn't mean anything to me; if they want to give a notice period 'more fool them' as they'll just be wasting their cash. I think it is best to make sure you have reserves to last a fair few months so that you do not not need to worry about an employer's decisions.

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Typically, notice periods are commensurate with the level of responsibility and seniority that you have. If it seems out of line with your salary, experience and role it may ring alarm bells with prospective employers.

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I would rather have no notice period. Just told on a Friday don't bother coming in on the Monday. Working out your notice period is soul destroying.

Well, we all have liabilities.. and yes I do prepare with savings, however having the security if redundancies are looming is a big benefit.

I'm not looking to leave, I actually quite like the company and they pay well. I'm just looking to protect myself.

Typically, notice periods are commensurate with the level of responsibility and seniority that you have. If it seems out of line with your salary, experience and role it may ring alarm bells with prospective employers.

I suppose. I did start over a decade ago, where 1 months notice would have been the norm (at that level). I would say 1 month would not be the norm with my position, and I'm sure my boss would say yes to 3 months. However, I'm debating whether I should do this or not.

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If an employer didn't want me I wouldn't want to work for them, so a notice period doesn't mean anything to me; if they want to give a notice period 'more fool them' as they'll just be wasting their cash.

I could only see this being a problem if I wanted to move on, if they wanted to get rid of me I could agree to go earlier.

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I've just realised the statutory redundancy notice period is 1 week for every year you have worked (up to 12 years).

So I would get 2.5months (10weeks) notice anyway.

Also, I've just realised statutory redundancy pay is capped at £450 per week (not your weekly salary) for every year you have worked (over 2 years, and is age related).

Hmm, now I know this there is little benefit to having a longer notice period.

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I'm on three months. On the one hand it gives me some security, but on the other it puts me at a disadvantage when applying for jobs compared to the many unemployed people in my industry (publishing) - who's going to wait a quarter of a year for someone to start a job? I only got my present job because I convinced my previous employer that I only needed to work half my notice.

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I would rather have no notice period. Just told on a Friday don't bother coming in on the Monday. Working out your notice period is soul destroying.

+1

I've been working out my notice for the last 3 months minus a week (last week starts Monday), soul destroying is exactly right. It's like a failing romance or a terminal illness, far better for all concerned just to get it over with.

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Hey all, just after some HPC advice.

I found out not so long ago my boss (company owner) has decided he isn't going to sell the business. Which is all nice and dandy, but I never knew he was thinking about it in the first place. Which has really made me think about my notice period, which is currently 1month on either side, and is it long enough? The company is a reasonable size, very successfully, and probably worth £10m or so (and has no debt).

If it were to be bought out, it would most likely be swallowed up by a far bigger competitor who would eventually get rid of us all, to bring things 'in house'.

I'm now thinking of asking for a three month notice period. I know if it were to change it would have to be on both sides, so I won't get away with 3months from the employer, but stay at 1month from me.

So (for those who are an employee), what is your notice period? What's the norm? Would you want a longer notice period?

My worry is I won't be able to find another job very quickly, specially not as the same wage level I am currently at.

I wouldn't bother asking for an extended notice period, I'd go for a clause in my contract of employment regarding change of ownership, given that seems to be the risk you want to protect against. How about something like 'guaranteed 6 months employment from the effective date in the event of a change of majority ownership'. That would give you time to find something else if the current owner sells.

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I think 3 months works well for both sides. If I was unexpectedly binned I think that time period gives me reasonable shot of lining up new position before I would start burning cash (I've been in this position in the past and it is nasty). I have worked a 3 month notice before as well - bit annoying but it allows you to leave in tidy fashion. In my area new employer would expect minimum of 3 months so that is not an issue.

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I'd be mightily p!ssed off if I was asked to *work* my notice. Three months pay in lieu is reasonable - but why would you want someone in the office for three months when you'd just canned them? Or if they'd handed in their notice thus making it clear that they didn't want to be there?

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I'd be mightily p!ssed off if I was asked to *work* my notice. Three months pay in lieu is reasonable - but why would you want someone in the office for three months when you'd just canned them? Or if they'd handed in their notice thus making it clear that they didn't want to be there?

Agree, if a company de-hires you then they will give you pay in lieu of notice, why would you ever go back again unless you wanted to appear "desperate"?

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I asked for, and got, my notice period extended to 3 months.

This is a company i like working for with people i like working with, but that went through a few rounds of redundancies which killed morale a bit.

My reasoning was simple enough - the redundancy payouts offered didn't make much account of years worked for the company, so i wanted to know if there was another round coming then i'd have a reasonable payoff coming, whether from redundancy or notice worked.

On their side, i've got knowledge of nearly the whole software platform we made in house - 1 month wouldn't be enough time to find a replacement, let alone have me train them up. Win/Win imo - i think if your working relationship was bad, then 3 months would be bad though. In that event i doubt you'd be forced to work it all though!

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I'm on three months. On the one hand it gives me some security, but on the other it puts me at a disadvantage when applying for jobs compared to the many unemployed people in my industry (publishing) - who's going to wait a quarter of a year for someone to start a job? I only got my present job because I convinced my previous employer that I only needed to work half my notice.

I'm on 3 months too! Basically it prevents me from getting contract work, with which I was quite happy, for some years.

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I'd be mightily p!ssed off if I was asked to *work* my notice. Three months pay in lieu is reasonable - but why would you want someone in the office for three months when you'd just canned them? Or if they'd handed in their notice thus making it clear that they didn't want to be there?

Agree with that. When people have been made redundant here they don't usually end up working their notice, and the ones who do often seem to end up with something additional in exchange for bothering to do anything during that time. As for it working the other way around, how much you'd have to get should depend upon your position (i.e. are you going to leave a lot of people in the lurch if you just get up and walk out?)

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Personally I think a month is more than long enough. Generally when I have left a company I have tried to leave earlier than my contract notice.

Seems pointless to be somewhere you really don't want to be, or they don't want you to be. Especially the later. I'd be professional about it and clear up and hand over any worked that needs to be, but for me that should only take a week or two.

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A month probably sounds about right. Quite often a really valued key employee who gives a month's notice can throw a company into turmoil when it suddenly becomes apparent that the person in question actually held the entire business together.

My own experience is mostly self employment but speaking with the people I know who are or have been employed, the majority lost their job because the company went into administration at which point any "agreements" about notice and severance pay become rather shaky but then in most cases the person concerned could see the light at the end of the tunnel fading from quite a way back.

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A month probably sounds about right. Quite often a really valued key employee who gives a month's notice can throw a company into turmoil when it suddenly becomes apparent that the person in question actually held the entire business together.

My own experience is mostly self employment but speaking with the people I know who are or have been employed, the majority lost their job because the company went into administration at which point any "agreements" about notice and severance pay become rather shaky but then in most cases the person concerned could see the light at the end of the tunnel fading from quite a way back.

Well if companies set themselves up in such a way then more fool them. In smaller businesses it's sometimes unavoidable however I have found that small companies are either excellent to work for or a total nightmare. In the former you for a personal relationship with the owners and when leaving you would do all you can (within reason) to make the process as easy and smooth as possible, in the later you simply don't hang around long enough to become indispensable.

As for the second part as I understand it statutory redundancy is covered under national insurance and so you would at least get the basic rates (which are low) if the company goes to the wall.

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I'm on a 3 month notice - when I was interviewing for speculative jobs, I asked if that was a problem. The answer was a quick no. So if you are right for the job; they will wait for you.

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