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FANG

I'm Seriously Considering Not Paying My Tv Licence

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I don't watch much live TV because mainly its just gash that they put on. I can happily get by on repeats or box sets if I fancy watching anything.

I have had enough of the obscene salaries and payoffs that the BBC give to their employees as well as the mismanagement of the paedophile scandal and misinformation and biased reports that they foist upon us.

Is anyone already doing this and are they getting much hassle from the licence fee collecting Nazis - I think this is just a scam.

Does anyone have an idea about what percentage of the populace have decided to opt out of paying.

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I'm gonna stop when mine expires as I don't watch TV anyway.

I earn about £140 a day so that means I'm effectively 'working for the bbc' for one day a year. They get one working day of my life a year. For a service I don't use. Ridiculous.

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I've been legally licence free for years, it's been very easy and no stress at all. Remove any equipment capable of receiving live broadcasts and stop paying your licence. They send you their meaningless letters, you put them in the bin unopened safe in the knowledge that you have done absolutely nothing wrong, are under no obligation to contact them and there's nothing they can do if you just ignore them. Once I had somebody come to the door, he said I didn't have a licence, I said I didn't have a TV. It wasn't stressful because I was telling the truth. He didn't ask to come in, he just noted it on his computer and left.

Don't worry about the lunatics on Youtube who bring out the camcorder every time somebody comes to the door and remove the implied right of access etc, I think those guys actually enjoy conflict with authority figures. Like I say, there is no need for any conflict if you just stop paying and quietly ignore them.

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6 months now since im tv tax free, ive not had any visits or any letters.

Its only a small thing but i do feel that at the very least ive made my stand against the lowlife BBC and perhaps even the wider establishment.

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Haven't paid for a few years, but then I don't watch anything live, so completely within the law. It astounds me that people still pay for it to be honest - is there really anything that you absolutely have to watch live, that is worth £145 per year for?!

Mind you, I think everyone else probably should continue to pay up, I would hate for them to stick loads of adverts on their catch-up service! :D

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A couple of years back I didn't have a TV, so I didn't have a TV licence. They sent fairly frequent envelopes reminding me how I had to have one if I had a TV, which I ignored as I didn't.

I now technically own a TV, but one which is neither tuned in, nor plugged into an aerial (it's my computer HDMI output for movie nights with mates). As I had a TV licence for some of the year and requested a refund for the unused quarters, they told me at the time I'd been marked as not needing a licence, so shouldn't get a reminder letter for two years. No problem, no stress.

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I don't watch much live TV because mainly its just gash that they put on. I can happily get by on repeats or box sets if I fancy watching anything.

I have had enough of the obscene salaries and payoffs that the BBC give to their employees as well as the mismanagement of the paedophile scandal and misinformation and biased reports that they foist upon us.

Is anyone already doing this and are they getting much hassle from the licence fee collecting Nazis - I think this is just a scam.

Does anyone have an idea about what percentage of the populace have decided to opt out of paying.

The law, as it stands, means you are able to watch any catch up services and DVDs etc without requiring a license.

Be careful, as sometimes websites allow both catchup and live streaming, the live streaming is not allowed without a license.

Also, if you stream live TV on a smart device when out and about you may need a license depending on the exact situation(the law is an ass in this respect and I'm not aware of anyone being done for this).

Knowledge is power. Read up an the exact situation so you don't get caught out. In the event that you are visited by a BBC salesperson, you will then have the confidence and knowledge to send them packing.

In fact, I'd recommend just sending a letter to "withdraw their implied right of access" to your front door to avoid them visiting at all. You do not have to give your name, just 'The legal occupier" is sufficient.

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In fact, I'd recommend just sending a letter to "withdraw their implied right of access" to your front door to avoid them visiting at all. You do not have to give your name, just 'The legal occupier" is sufficient.

Why draw attention to yourself? I'd only do this if the visits were becoming a problem, which they aren't.

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2539522/Licence-fee-payers-BBCs-2bn-pensions-black-hole-Deficit-scheme-doubled-2010.html

Licence fee-payers to top up BBC's £2bn pensions black hole: Deficit in scheme has almost doubled since 2010

Corporation plans to use £740 million from licence fee to plug the gap

Previous attempts to make staff pay led to strikes and cancelled shows

Annual top-up comes to almost twice the cost of Radio 4

Huge pension pots include one of £3.9 million to former director of radio

The BBC is planning to use £740 million from the licence fee to fill a giant £2 billion hole in its pensions scheme.

A new valuation has revealed that the deficit in the Corporation’s pension fund has almost doubled from £1.1 billion in 2010.

But instead of asking staff to help plug the gap – a request which previously led to strikes and prime-time programmes taken off air – the BBC will take a large slice from the taxpayer-funded licence-fee to foot the bill over four years.

The figures, published in a report by the BBC’s independent pension trustees, mean around £7.36 of every household’s £145.50 licence fee now goes towards the pension deficit. But rather than release the embarrassing figures publicly, the BBC published them only in an internal email to its staff, prompting accusations it wanted to hide the bad news.

Last night Tory MP Rob Wilson said: ‘It says it all about how the BBC operates that this huge black hole in its pension fund was announced internally, rather than the Corporation being open and accountable to the public who will have to foot the bill.’

Similar to public sector workers, many BBC staff had a generous final-salary scheme that guaranteed a pension based on the length of service and earnings at the end of their careers, but it was closed to new staff in 2010 amid concerns over the mounting deficit.

The BBC has already faced criticism that it is overstaffed and bloated with managers.

A FOI request in 2011 found that out of 4,500 staff on permanent and fixed-term contracts, 2,000 had the word ‘manager’ included in their job title. It also has 8,000 journalists – vastly more than the rest of Fleet Street put together.

Between now and 2017, the BBC will have to pump an extra £365 million into its pension fund on top of £375 million it had already agreed to pay.

However, the BBC yesterday said it had anticipated the increase in its pension deficit two years ago, and took the increased payments into account when making its current financial plans. This meant that programme budgets are unaffected by the additional payments from the licence fee.

The BBC’s generous pension arrangements have been a source of contention for years. Some of those who have benefited from huge BBC pensions include former deputy director general Mark Byford, who walked away with a £3.4 million pension pot – on top of a £1 million severance payment – when he was made redundant in 2011, and radio chief Dame Jenny Abramsky, who retired in 2008 with a pension pot worth £3.9 million.

The last pension valuation, in 2010, led to protracted industrial action after the BBC asked staff to accept lower benefits and higher contributions. When negotiations with unions collapsed, journalists and technical staff left their posts, forcing flagship programmes including Today and Newsnight off the air.

Last night, BBC insiders said the deficit had been caused by low interest rates and an increase in the life expectancy of pension holders. A BBC spokesman added: ‘We have agreed a sensible and affordable plan to address the deficit, without adversely affecting programmes or pension scheme members.’

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If you don`t have a TV, and you obviously then don`t buy the licence, do you have to let them in to check the equipment? Their letters imply that you do. Is there a legal way to make it clear to them that they are not getting in, and they need to stop coming to the door?

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If you don`t have a TV, and you obviously then don`t buy the licence, do you have to let them in to check the equipment? Their letters imply that you do. Is there a legal way to make it clear to them that they are not getting in, and they need to stop coming to the door?

Capita (BBC agents) do not have any right of access to your home.! You do not have to answer any of their questions. If you do speak to them you can just politely ask them to leave. You do not have to tell them your name. They have no more rights than a sky sales person knocking on your door.

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Capita (BBC agents) do not have any right of access to your home.! You do not have to answer any of their questions. If you do speak to them you can just politely ask them to leave. You do not have to tell them your name. They have no more rights than a sky sales person knocking on your door.

+1 They use implied threats and assumed authority to bully people into letting them in. They have no more rights than anyone else to enter your home or "check your equipment".

I've never had one call round personally, but would have no problem politely asking them to do one if they ever came pestering me. Problem is my wife will always let people in as she's too polite to refuse (not that we have anything to hide, but it's the principle that bugs me).

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If you don`t have a TV, and you obviously then don`t buy the licence, do you have to let them in to check the equipment? Their letters imply that you do.

They do not have any rights whatsoever to enter your premises for any reason whatsoever.

To enter your premises against your will they would have to get the police with search warrant which they will only be able to get if they can convince a judge that they have proof that you are watching TV without a license.

They are private salesmen with the same rights as used vacuum cleaner salesmen.

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I got rid of my licence a few years ago (in the wake of the "Sachsgate") affair.

Wish I'd done it years ago!

Initially I used a lot of catch up services and watched DVDs but I very rarely bother doing even that now.

I listen to a lot more radio (especially Radio 4), Spotify, and read and surf the internet. Compared to these things watching TV just seems a bit passive to me now.

Also from my memory, the quality of "debate" on Question Time was woeful - I much prefer Any Questions now. Also Nick Abbot on LBC at the weekends is also worth a listen.

When I got a refund for the unused portion of my TV licence I also received a letter saying they would send someone round to "verify" a licence was no longer required. Cheek. I just wrote to them removing their presumed right of access and I haven't heard a peep from them since. I would recommend doing this - even if you only get their letters a couple of times a year, it is a distraction that is best got rid of.

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Problem is my wife will always let people in as she's too polite to refuse (not that we have anything to hide, but it's the principle that bugs me).

That`s the situation I have. I do not want to be out if a guy calls and leave it to my wife and my daughter..I feel like I would be leaving them vulnerable. It shouldn`t be like that should it!. I should feel that anyone calling will not be hardnosed with them if I am out.

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That`s the situation I have. I do not want to be out if a guy calls and leave it to my wife and my daughter..I feel like I would be leaving them vulnerable. It shouldn`t be like that should it!. I should feel that anyone calling will not be hardnosed with them if I am out.

Attitudes change. My wife was like that which is why I bought a b&w licence even though we received no live broadcasts at the time.

We have been LLF for three years now (since the wife successfully closed the door on one of Crapita salespeople and realised what toothless tigers they really are).

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Why draw attention to yourself? I'd only do this if the visits were becoming a problem, which they aren't.

Depends on whether the OP has any other in the household who may feel intimidated by someone turning up with a pretend official air who may not know the finer points of the legislation they are attempting to enforce.

I know people who have sent the letters upon ceasing to renew a license prior to any visits and they have not been bothered at all, several years later.

Withdrawing implied right of access does not confer any admission of guilt whatsoever. I suspect the BBC just go after low hanging fruit instead- poorly educated women in less affluent areas.

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Depends on whether the OP has any other in the household who may feel intimidated by someone turning up with a pretend official air who may not know the finer points of the legislation they are attempting to enforce.

I know people who have sent the letters upon ceasing to renew a license prior to any visits and they have not been bothered at all, several years later.

Withdrawing implied right of access does not confer any admission of guilt whatsoever. I suspect the BBC just go after low hanging fruit instead- poorly educated women in less affluent areas.

Interesting. If it's as simple and effective as that then maybe it's worth doing.

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Interesting. If it's as simple and effective as that then maybe it's worth doing.

Seems to have worked for the few I know that have done this, and I received written confirmation that they would not call.

Takes away any potential stress, if that's the sort of thing that might upset you were you to get a call from someone you don't want to talk to. If you live in a place with a secure entry phone that may change matters (I don't).

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quote name='happy_renting' timestamp='1391006060' post='1102458000']

Every time someone witholds their licence fee, a Pontipine in The Night Garden dies.

BTW Pontipines work for Capita, so go for it.

3 pontipines...4 pontipines...5 pontipines....I wish they would all die..that cartoon is burned into my brain....

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My license expired last May and I'd already stopped watching TV for a couple of months before that. Because they have my name and address I filled out the declaration online and have had no visits or letters since. I expect this will change in future and I will not bother filling out anymore forms from then onwards.

I've detuned the TV set and removed and packed away all aerial cables. I might rarely watch something on iplayer catch-up but I've gotten into the habit of never turning the app on.

If you really won't watch any live TV then I'd say go ahead and do it. Ignore the letters as they are meaningless. Mostly just threats. If you get a visit you can either be polite and say 'I don't need a TV license thankyou, good day' or be brisk and shut the door in their face. They have no power to enter your home without a search warrant, which is quite rare and probably caused by antagonising a particularly spiteful licencing employee. Even then they have to present evidence to a magistrate for a warrant. If you were unlucky and things escalated there's loads of advice online in forums and it's really not common.

I'd say don't bother with the removing access legal route. They often ignore it or claim ignorance and it likely puts you higher on their radar. Just be polite and ask them to ****** off.

As for the wife. I told mine that they have no right to enter without a warrant (if they aren't with the police call them up and ask them to check the warrant is real and witness the search). Don't answer any questions, ask them to leave, and shut the door. She's okay with that.

That Mirror article recently said about 500k households have declared legally having no license. But I think the figures suggest something magnitudes higher don't pay without informing the BBC.

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Ps can anyone link me to a reasonably cheap product that would allow me to use the internet on my reasonably smart TV. I use a Roku box which is great for netflix and i player but would like to access web pages on my TV, and possibly with a wireless keyboard.?.

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