Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
2005

Did You All Miss The David And David Show

Recommended Posts

Sky had a one hour debate between David Cameron and David Davies today with an audience of undecided conservative members and poltical comentators.

David Cameron raised the issue of young and the housing situation. The younger generation - priced out of the market - haven't got the opportunities that the older generation had etc etc....

During the last election I ws involved in a campaign group. What they did was send a form to everyone on their books. The form basically consisted of a review of their concerns and a 'statement of support' requiring a signature.

The idea was that when any candidate came to your door you would hand them the form and say 'if you sign that and agree to raise and persue the issue in parliament then I will agree to vote for you'

Are there any conservative members out there? Could you press David Cameron to take up the issue?

Might be worth a try - at least it would give them the impression that this is a real concern that needs dealing with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just sent the following message to David Cameron

Dear David Cameron

I watched your debate with David Davies today on Sky News and was especially interested in your comments about opportunities for the young and the difficulties that younger, first time buyers have in getting on the housing ladder, or even securing reasonable housing that meets their needs.

I am in this position myself. Despite the fact that both myself and my partner are highly qualified (PhD level) and both work we are priced out of the housing market. We are not the only ones.

This is a real concern for the yonger generation. Labour have not addressed this issue because they are, I feel, more concerned with keeping the majority happy by creating 'paper wealth' rather than addressing the real housing concerns and needs in this country. This is just stoking up problems for the future. The level of debt in this country is the highest ever. First time buyers are having to take out huge amounts of debt (sometimes through dubious self certificate mortgages) in order to buy a small flat.

In addition to this there is a growing number of young families and single people who are homeless. The waiting list for council housing is growing all the time. These people are in need.

If you have any doubt that the housing issue in this country is a real concern may I draw your attention to the following website

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/

Thank you for expressing an interest in this important issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest rigsby II

The waiting list for council housing is growing all the time. These people are in need.

Let me get this straight, you contacted a conservative to$$er because there is no council housing.

I feel, more concerned with keeping the majority happy by creating 'paper wealth' rather than addressing the real housing concerns and needs in this country.

Then you bash a politicians ear about keeping the majority happy.

First time buyers are having to take out huge amounts of debt (sometimes through dubious self certificate)

Yeah, he's a conservative - he don't have mates in money lending profit making industries or anything like that then - course not

Despite the fact that both myself and my partner are highly qualified (PhD level)

Hmmm, highly qualified, but rather wet behind the ears...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dont confuse expensive property with homelessness

RENTING is the answer, why be so obsessed with buying.

Idiot BTL speculatiors are creating alot of new supply

Dr Bubb

I appreciate that you have strong views about how renting instead of buying makes good economic sense. However, you are comparing one against the other in order to reach this view and conclude that renting is cheaper than buying.

However, renting is still expensive for many people. It is not a matter of which one is cheaper - buying or renting. It is a matter of what people can afford.

For a young working family with two children renting a 2/3 bed house in todays market is still very very expensive for people on low pay. A few years ago buying was a cheaper option.

As an example: there is an area near me that is a well know first time buyer area/young families. It is full of two/three bed terrace houses and most people who live in this area owned a first house there at one time.

Four years ago these houses went for about £50-55K. A mortage on this house would be about £300-350 per month.

Now-priced out of the market because they now go for just over £100K these families will have to rent - at a cost of £500-550 per month.

Their housing costs of gone up by £200 per month because they have to rent instead of buying.

Yes renting is currently cheaper than buying but renting is still more expensive than buying was 3/4 years ago and for a young family on below average pay or with only one parent working housing costs have gone up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me get this straight, you contacted a conservative to$$er because there is no council housing.

Then you bash a politicians ear about keeping the majority happy.

Yeah, he's a conservative - he don't have mates in money lending profit making industries or anything like that then - course not

Hmmm, highly qualified, but rather wet behind the ears...

I think the point is that this should be on the poltical agenda and this was an opportunity to raise the issue of housing at a time when policy decisions are being made and are in the public and political 'spotlight'.

Do you really think any of them will do anything?

Are you suggesting that anyone in New Labour is more concerned - or hasn't got vested interests in property/business etc?

Do you think Gordon or Tony lie awake at night worrying about FTB's or how yong people can afford decent housing?

Are you suggesting that any of them make decisions or adopt policy because they 'care'.

If you do then I would suggest it is you who is 'wet behind the ears'

If I actually thought that writing to an MP would make any difference I would hardly have written to an MP who isn't even the leader of his party yet and isn't even in government.

Getting issues on the agenda is important - it is only when a problem is identified as a problem and is on the agenda that anything will get done about it.

Tony and Gordon along with the BBC have done a very good job of keeping the housing issue in the UK off the public agenda so everything is OK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your letter mentions both:

"First time buyers are having to take out huge amounts of debt"

"young families and single people who are homeless"

The first, are brainless squags, who should be renting now. They are too stupid or too impatient

to way for the cycle to do its inevitable work.

The second, are genuinely distressed people.

They should not be compared IMO. The efforts required to change things for these two groups are

very, very different. Tightening credit standards, would bring down property prices, but do nothing

for the homeless

I am not suggesting that their needs are the same but I do disagree with your statement that property prices have nothing to do with the homeless.

I personally know (within a small group of people) five families who currently live in a council house. They do not want to buy the council house. When they got the house they were in housing need. Their cirumstances have now changed - they are working/their kids have grown up etc. Some of them have got very good jobs and a reasonable income.

They would love to go and buy a house on the open market but they can not afford to do so.

They are effectively 'house blocking'

For every one of those families there is a family who is currently in real need of housing - but the waiting list just grows.

If I know five families like this how many more are there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first, are brainless squags, who should be renting now. They are too stupid or too impatient

to way for the cycle to do its inevitable work.

The second, are genuinely distressed people.

They should not be compared IMO. The efforts required to change things for these two groups are

very, very different. Tightening credit standards, would bring down property prices, but do nothing

for the homeless

Hang on a minute Bubba. Not so sure I agree on the brianless squags. One example, talking to an FTB yesterday exchanging on 2 bed terrace, buying for 88k, 17k less than the original price others similar have gone for as much as 120-130k. 70k mortgage, £450 per month repayment same place would be £500 to rent. Place needs a bit of remedial work, but 5 rooms to decorate, floors to strip, a new boiler, can be done over a 2 year period and he`ll hardly even notice the added cost.

The 10% of FTBs are not all brain dead in fact most, sadly now at an average age of 34+, are pretty much clued up on everything from best rates on offer to where the bargains are. Their eyes are very much wide open IMHO ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest rigsby II

Getting issues on the agenda is important - it is only when a problem is identified as a problem and is on the agenda that anything will get done about it.

What problem ? - for 90% of the home owning population, there is absolutely no problem, quite the reverse its been a boon.

If people are genuinely homeless, then that is a problem.

What isn't a problem is the inability to buy 4 bed detached starter homes straight out of uni, which is the perceived problem by many on here - there is a big difference.

As to whether its sensible to buy now is the 64 dollar question, but the actual ability to buy now is not a real problem for many with the wages quoted on here - so its not really a problem, its a choice.

I'd start a protest - Freds your man, here's a clarion cry

What do we want ? Country farmhouses with plenty of developmental opportunity for business rental

When do we want it ? Now and for next to nowt.

Cheers then...

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What problem ? - for 90% of the home owning population, there is absolutely no problem, quite the reverse its been a boon.

If people are genuinely homeless, then that is a problem.

What isn't a problem is the inability to buy 4 bed detached starter homes straight out of uni, which is the perceived problem by many on here - there is a big difference.

As to whether its sensible to buy now is the 64 dollar question, but the actual ability to buy now is not a real problem for many with the wages quoted on here - so its not really a problem, its a choice.

I'd start a protest - Freds your man, here's a clarion cry

What do we want ? Country farmhouses with plenty of developmental opportunity for business rental

When do we want it ? Now and for next to nowt.

Cheers then...

:)

What a narrow minded and silly response.

90% are happy are they - can you back that up?

As for your opinion that everyone wants to buy a four bed house straight out of university or a country farm house - you obviously haven't a clue.

There are many people who can't afford to buy a 2 bed flat in a poor area.

If people are genuinely homeless, then that is a problem.

There are genuinely homeless people - do you walk around with your eyes shut?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just sent the following message to David Cameron

Dear David Cameron

I watched your debate with David Davies today on Sky News and was especially interested in your comments about opportunities for the young and the difficulties that younger, first time buyers have in getting on the housing ladder, or even securing reasonable housing that meets their needs.

I am in this position myself. Despite the fact that both myself and my partner are highly qualified (PhD level) and both work we are priced out of the housing market. We are not the only ones.

This is a real concern for the yonger generation. Labour have not addressed this issue because they are, I feel, more concerned with keeping the majority happy by creating 'paper wealth' rather than addressing the real housing concerns and needs in this country.

There's another reason on the opposite side of the coin, the government no longer fund long term care for the elderly unless they're destitute or something. I spoke to somebody the other day and their mother has moved into a home and they've had to put her flat on the market, the £100k raised went straight to the state which will no doubt fund care of the old dear plus another couple of less fortunate people too.

Young people have to pay the cost for that directly, everyone in between is just shuffling bits of paper around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.