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Want Your Say On How To Transform Uk Housing?

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This is the Homepage of the Lyons Housing Review, an independent Review being carried out by Sir Michael Lyons for Labour's Policy Review.

The country is in the midst of the biggest housing crisis in a generation. We are building less than half the number of homes we need to keep up with demand.

This housing shortage plays a central part in the cost of living crisis, leaving millions of working people unable to afford the homes they want. Back in 1997 it took an average family just three years to save for a proper deposit on a home but today it takes 22 years.

If home ownership is to be a realistic aspiration for working people, and rents are to be affordable, then we will need a step change in the scale of house building in England.

At Labour's Annual Conference in September 2013 Ed Miliband announced his plans for a Labour Government to increase the supply of new homes in England above 200,000 a year by the end of the next Parliament.

To ensure plans to achieve this ambition are in place on day one of a Labour Government, a commission chaired by Sir Michael Lyons has been asked to draw up a road map that will set out the changes to housing and planning policies and practice that are required to deliver the new homes and communities we need.

If you would like to make a submission to the Lyons Review, please use the input form on the right of this page, or email submissions@lyonshousingreview.org.uk. The deadline for responses is 28 February 2014.

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Given that Labour are probably going to be in government in 16 months' time, I think all of us on this site have a duty to let them know what we think...

NB: Requires registration.

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If they all killed themselves that would certainly help

Would it? Labour have a terrible record on housing, but I don't see any of their competitor parties doing much to make housing cheaper and more plentiful either.

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I don't hold the others in high regard either, but labour oversaw the bubble. Brown in particular in his role as chancellor and then in inheriting the mess he created for himself as prime minister. In fact Brown is the most responsible person you could pin it onto and im not surprised he's been in hiding ever since.

To be fair to the current government they did inherit houses at bubble levels which requires bravery to correct. They should have done it I agree, but they bear far less responsibility for the situation than those who were in power over the 13 years it took to get this bad.

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I don't hold the others in high regard either, but labour oversaw the bubble. Brown in particular in his role as chancellor and then in inheriting the mess he created for himself as prime minister. In fact Brown is the most responsible person you could pin it onto and im not surprised he's been in hiding ever since.

To be fair to the current government they did inherit houses at bubble levels which requires bravery to correct. They should have done it I agree, but they bear far less responsibility for the situation than those who were in power over the 13 years it took to get this bad.

I wouldn't mind so much if they'd admit their errors between 1997 and 2010, but they don't.

Anyway Labour can't or won't do anything to upset the banks and various other players in the land/finance/rentier cartel anyway, so whatever they say now will come to nothing if they're elected.

It's really not complicated to do what needs to be done, the problem is overcoming the vested interests.

In a political system where the parties are funded by those interests and not by the people they represent, and the media that influences the people is owned by the same interests, why would you expect any political party to do anything that will displease the vested interests?

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I don't hold the others in high regard either, but labour oversaw the bubble. Brown in particular in his role as chancellor and then in inheriting the mess he created for himself as prime minister. In fact Brown is the most responsible person you could pin it onto and im not surprised he's been in hiding ever since.

To be fair to the current government they did inherit houses at bubble levels which requires bravery to correct. They should have done it I agree, but they bear far less responsibility for the situation than those who were in power over the 13 years it took to get this bad.

Like it or not, the polls and the electoral arithmetic suggest Labour are coming back to power in 2015. This is your chance to tell them what you think about housing. If you want to have a pop at them about their record, now's your chance!

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Like it or not, the polls and the electoral arithmetic suggest Labour are coming back to power in 2015. This is your chance to tell them what you think about housing. If you want to have a pop at them about their record, now's your chance!

Done. Not that it'll come to much.

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You can tell how short of ideas Labour are. Here's Ed a couple of weeks ago in the Telegraph:

Yesterday, Emma Reynolds[shadow housing minister] explained how we will increase the supply of new homes.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/ed-miliband/10568830/Ed-Miliband-only-Labour-can-rebuild-our-middle-class.html

So what did she explain?:

So what measures can we expect to help Mr Miliband hit his 200,000 homes per year target? The Lyons review, due to conclude this autumn, is intended to give Labour policies it can implement immediately in 2015, says Ms Reynolds.

Sir Michael will look at how social landlords can help boost supply, including the idea of local authority-led housing companies.

Ms Reynolds does not go into detail, saying it will be up to the commission to come up with fully-fledged proposals.

However, she states that new towns must be part of the solution, suggesting a Labour government will not be able to devote large amounts of public funding to do this, she says: ‘It [the funding] is going to have to come from the private sector.’

Ms Reynolds says one potential model would work in a similar way to help to buy, where the state underwrites loans to private companies, allowing the funding of new towns through cheaper private finance.

Ms Reynolds has given a taste of future Labour housing policy. But important questions on how much money will go into affordable housing, what exactly the party will fund and the extent to which it backs social rent or security of tenure seem unlikely to be answered anytime soon.

http://www.insidehousing.co.uk/home/analysis/eyes-wide-open/7001567.article

Lyons:

If home ownership is to be a realistic aspiration for working people, and rents are to be affordable, then we will need a step change in the scale of house building in England.

At Labour's Annual Conference in September 2013 Ed Miliband announced his plans for a Labour Government to increase the supply of new homes in England above 200,000 a year by the end of the next Parliament.

To ensure plans to achieve this ambition are in place on day one of a Labour Government, a commission chaired by Sir Michael Lyons has been asked to draw up a road map that will set out the changes to housing and planning policies and practice that are required to deliver the new homes and communities we need.

Talk about supine. They want to build 200k houses per annum but have no ideas on how to achieve it.

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For information:

http://

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Lyons_%28BBC_chairman%29

So elections are in the offing so they're highlighting an inquiry about housing. All the numerous inquiries about housing over the years and they still don't know what the problems are :rolleyes:

It's along the lines of the MacDevastator saying he wouldn't allow house prices to get out of control and so on and so on.

If the inquiry had been about where to build new houses, what type of houses, how to rein in the amount of credit going towards housing, how/where to house the extra millions due to population growth in the past 10 years or so and the extra millions on top of that in the next 10 years, how to deal with the awful congestion and such like then they might have moved forward a step but yet another "Housing Review" - no it's totally pathetic but maybe marginally less totally pathetic than the Conservative and LibDem efforts.

Edited by billybong

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Talk about supine. They want to build 200k houses per annum but have no ideas on how to achieve it.

Easy really, release publicly owned plots of land for £10k, with criteria for homesters rather than BTL (lottery), maybe some medium term conditions to prevent cashing in, encourage self-built by local builders or even modern pre-fabs, Accept that homes should be costing a fraction of what they do. Lower housing costs, free the people, stimulate the economy to benefit the many not the few.

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Easy really, release publicly owned plots of land for £10k, with criteria for homesters rather than BTL (lottery), maybe some medium term conditions to prevent cashing in, encourage self-built by local builders or even modern pre-fabs, Accept that homes should be costing a fraction of what they do. Lower housing costs, free the people, stimulate the economy to benefit the many not the few.

Indeed. I guess what I mean is "Labour don't want to state a firm policy as they are unsure as to whether pissing off nimbies will cost them more votes than they gain from disenfranchised youngsters that are clued up enough to realize that bulldozing Farmer Barleymow's fallow factory floor might not, in all instances, be a bad idea"

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Given that Labour are probably going to be in government in 16 months' time, I think all of us on this site have a duty to let them know what we think...

NB: Requires registration.

So if it takes a family 22 years to save a deposit, they won`t really be a family any more when they are ready to buy, unless they are suffering from some form of arrested development?

There must be a LOT of homeless people I don`t know about if we need 200k new houses a year, and have done for many years?

I honestly don`t think Labour are going to be in government, Ed is not popular enough to swing the vote.

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Politicians wouldn't fix a panel would they? Here's the people formulating the review:

The Expert Panel comprises:

•Sir Michael Lyons

•Tom Bloxham, Chairman and Co-Founder, Urban Splash

•Mark Clare, Group Chief Executive, Barratt Developments Plc.

•Julia Evans, National Federation of Builders.

•Kate Henderson, Chief Executive, Town and Country Planning Association.

•Bill Hughes, Legal and General

•Grainia Long, Chief Executive, Chartered Institute of Housing

•Simon Marsh, Head of Planning Policy, RSPB

•David Orr, Chief Executive, National Housing Federation

•Richard Parker, Partner and Head of Housing, PwC

•Malcolm Sharp, Immediate Past President, Planning Officers’ Society

•Ed Turner, Deputy Leader, Oxford City Council

•Prof. Cecilia Wong, Professor of Spatial Planning, University of Manchester

I count 1/2 of these people are in planning or work for builder's lobbyists, think they'll reform the system to any great degree?

Still, I'm sure they are interested in plebs' views.

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Politicians wouldn't fix a panel would they? Here's the people formulating the review:

I count 1/2 of these people are in planning or work for builder's lobbyists, think they'll reform the system to any great degree?

Still, I'm sure they are interested in plebs' views.

Just like those crisis meetings for first time buyers that didn't include any first time buyer representation.

Politicians + lobbyists = stitch-up

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Politicians wouldn't fix a panel would they? Here's the people formulating the review:

I count 1/2 of these people are in planning or work for builder's lobbyists, think they'll reform the system to any great degree?

Still, I'm sure they are interested in plebs' views.

Exactly, just more pure shite from LieMore. They are not going to win the election in my opinion, so this is just more hot air for them to blow.

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Just like those crisis meetings for first time buyers that didn't include any first time buyer representation.

Politicians + lobbyists = stitch-up

Ah yes, Shapps's summit for FTBs on 15 Feb 2011. The attendees look similar to Labour's policy panel.

The Chartered Institute of Housing, on the Lyon review panel, was there:

http://www.cih.org/news-article/display/vpathDCR/templatedata/cih/news-article/data/CIH_comments_on_first_-_time_buyers_summit

Telegraph mentions a few others with a similar theme:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/borrowing/mortgages/8327372/First-time-buyers-need-a-31500-deposit.html

a First-Time Buyers summit hosted by housing minister Grant Shapps and attended by a range of industry representatives, including people from the Building Societies Association, the Home Builders Federation, housing charity Shelter, the Financial Services Authority and local councils.

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Too late for that sort of chat now, you're in my sig 'til election day whether you like it or not :lol:

Ah, you caught me out there! I suppose I hate both of them so much that my rambling mind has fantasies about both parties being thrown out by a new peoples party or something, but I think my thinking about Cameron was that his party will get rid of him at some point.

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Ah, you caught me out there! I suppose I hate both of them so much that my rambling mind has fantasies about both parties being thrown out by a new peoples party or something, but I think my thinking about Cameron was that his party will get rid of him at some point.

Well, it's no secret that I think Ed will win despite his clear inability to grasp a simply policy idea that would clean up votes overall- "reduce housing costs". I received a leaflet from Labour a few months ago banging on about the cost of living, but (and you know what's coming) there was absolutely no mention of housing costs. Mince, bread, eggs, yes. Housing, no. Almost... deliberate.

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Well, it's no secret that I think Ed will win despite his clear inability to grasp a simply policy idea that would clean up votes overall- "reduce housing costs". I received a leaflet from Labour a few months ago banging on about the cost of living, but (and you know what's coming) there was absolutely no mention of housing costs. Mince, bread, eggs, yes. Housing, no. Almost... deliberate.

Yes, they will never say it, we just need them to lose control of rates and for an outside event, EZ hopefully, to liven things up a bit?

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Easy really, release publicly owned plots of land for £10k, with criteria for homesters rather than BTL (lottery), maybe some medium term conditions to prevent cashing in, encourage self-built by local builders or even modern pre-fabs, Accept that homes should be costing a fraction of what they do. Lower housing costs, free the people, stimulate the economy to benefit the many not the few.

Great post! :)

Also - how about build housing that is solely for rent, owned by either local authorities (a cut above cheap rent council housing/ HA) or institutions like insurance firms that are in it for the very long term?

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