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Eu To Blame For Uk Flooding

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2541773/Drowned-EU-millions-Thought-extreme-weather-blame-floods-Wrong-The-real-culprit-European-subsidies-pay-UK-farmers-destroy-trees-soak-storm.html

Drowned by EU millions: Thought 'extreme weather' was to blame for the floods? Wrong. The real culprit is the European subsidies that pay UK farmers to destroy the very trees that soak up the storm

Water sinks into the soil under trees at 67 times the rate of soil under grass

Farmers are not eligible for EU payment if the land is covered by trees

As a result, flood-preventing trees are cut down, removing vital protection

The law of unintended consequences? Would the EU be liable for flood damage?

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Isn't it the same with water companies, and how they released water from reservoirs in autumn expecting the winter rain to fill them ready for the summer. Of course, those dry winters we had a years back resulted in huge criticism of the water companies as we had a drought. Now they don't release as much water in autumn.

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Isn't it the same with water companies, and how they released water from reservoirs in autumn expecting the winter rain to fill them ready for the summer. Of course, those dry winters we had a years back resulted in huge criticism of the water companies as we had a drought. Now they don't release as much water in autumn.

I don't think they just release it and hope it fills up again.

They do use the rivers as a way of transferring water from one reservoir to another. There's a pumping station a Gunnislake that can transfer water to Plymouth and then on to another place.

GuniPump_zps460a25f9.jpg

One hot summer they did release a load of water into the Tamar for transfer, but forgot to suck it up at the other end and it flowed out to sea! :lol:

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That's a crock of shite.

Source

The navy had, for many years, depended on English forests for their ships. According to legend, the Spanish asked one of their ambassadors, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, to sneak up and set fire to the Forest of Dean, hoping it would give their Armada an advantage. As England's navy grew, the need for timber began to seriously pick away at the woodland: from an estimated land coverage of 15% in 1086, England's forests and woods had dwindled to just 5.2% by 1905.

The first world war was the low point, and in 1916 Herbert Asquith's government established the Acland committee to study the problem. They said England desperately needed to replenish and maintain "strategic reserves of timber", and within a few years the Forestry Act would lead to the establishment of the Forestry Commission to carry this out.

In the years since, a steady programme of afforestation has increased England's forest cover back to 13% – not far off the levels of 1,000 years ago.

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That's a crock of shite.

To be fair I think the OP was referring to the reduction in orchards not forestry, but it's unlikely the EU's decision not to subsidise orchards was the primary reason for this decline given the trend was firmly established before this even became an issue:

In 1972 there were 55,000 acres of dessert apple orchards in England. By 2000 the total had fallen to barely 5,000, and the main reasons were cheap imports and a lack of curiosity among consumers. The big supermarkets liked the foreigners' low prices and reliability of supply, and showed little interest in promoting home-grown produce.

http://www.telegraph...e-ocalypse.html

Since 1950, fewer and fewer traditional orchards have been planted and the national stock of standard fruit trees is now heavily biased towards an older generation of trees that are more than 50 years old. The 1980s saw the beginning of a significant push to try to reduce the national dependence on food imports with the advent of the Common Agricultural Policy. Funding was made available to convert traditional orchards into more productive farmland causing the widespread destruction of older orchards; a pattern which, to some extent, continues today.

http://www.buildingc...al-orchards.htm

In relation to flooding this probably has not had an impact as the numbers involved are much smaller than in forestry and therefore the increases in forested land should more than offset the lost orchards.

But while increasing the number of trees, hedges and front gardens (instead of paved off-street parking) can help reduce flood risk I'm not sure they would entirely solve the problem of increased rainfall, which is what seems to be the real issue. Just check out this interactive graphic on recorded rainfall from 1910 to 2012, it's pretty easy to see the increase in frequency of high rainfall years as you get closer to the present day:

http://www.telegraph...since-1910.html

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To be fair I think the OP was referring to the reduction in orchards not forestry, but it's unlikely the EU's decision not to subsidise orchards was the primary reason for this decline given the trend was firmly established before this even became an issue:

Indeed.

AIUI, modern (post-1945) intensive agriculture may have reduced the capacity of some land to absorb water, both before and after we joined the EU. But the big culprit is building over so much land. Where now are the meadows where as a small sprog in the '60s I used regularly to play in the floods? Those were clean and harmless and quite exciting at a certain age. In one year they rose so high as to flood some houses, but I don't think it ever became a Big Thing like today: people just made the best of it.

There are houses around here built in the expectation they will semiperiodically-regularly flood, with features like flagstone floors and walls downstairs to protect them from taking lasting damage from it.

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for some reason I started on this tread .... and ended up ...here

Prometheus_tree1.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prometheus_(tree)

114 made me sad ....

way too much cidre tonight

Don't worry, it had a good innings.

Anyway a pint of cider has about 4 apples in it, and each apple has about 10 pips, so one pint = 40 apple trees that won't be grown.... how many pints have you had? :lol:

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There are houses around here built in the expectation they will semiperiodically-regularly flood, with features like flagstone floors and walls downstairs to protect them from taking lasting damage from it.

I don't know the long term data, but if the increasing frequency of heavy rainfall years continues as a trend I suspect those are going to end up being annually flooded. Probably would be better off building them on stilts in the first place, especially given building them directly on flood land is displacing water onto pre-existing homes which wouldn't otherwise flood...

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