Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

The Knimbies who say No

Drills.

Recommended Posts

Ok toolmaniacs, I'm interested in getting a new drill.

I'm a bit confused by the baffling array of items with triggers and bits available, 'impact drills', 'combi drills', 'rotary hammer' etc.

My needs:

Occasional use, I'd prefer to be able to put a large hole in anything I'd likely encounter around and outside a house, including concrete and property bulls. I'm not going to be installing huge stuff, but if I fancy drilling a bracket for a padlock into the concrete garage floorpad it would be nice to have the option if it were possible with the same tool I can mount a towelrail with, and chisel plaster, tiles, off with etc. Corded electrical is my preference as I doubt I'd use it enough to keep the batteries in good condition. My current drill is a cordless one which barely functions on softwood anymore.

I could also buy a hand drill for the easy plasterboard stuff, in addition to a bigger thing for everything else.

What sort of things should I look at? Watts? Speed control? Being able to switch off hammering action?

Any tips appreciated.

This seems like good value:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bosch-PBH-2500-Rotary-Hammer/dp/B00499DR80/ref=sr_1_2?s=diy&ie=UTF8&qid=1389394941&sr=1-2&keywords=bosch+pbh

Bosch tools I have bought to date seem to be of decent quality, although happy to have my illusions shattered...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just as long as you're not going to use it for denistry.

When I worked in Middlesbrough, about a decade ago, a woman showed up in Casualty with a sheared-off bit of a 0.5mm wood drill bit embedded in her molar. Turned out that her "dentist" (of Indian extraction and who never bothered getting himself licensed to work in the UK, if indeed he'd ever bothered in India) had been buying them by the dozen from his local B & Q for many years, as a budget alternative to the approved medical device ones that cost £70 each. That story makes me break out in a cold sweat on the mercifully few occasions I have to visit a dentist now...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, green Bosch is consumer crap avoid designed for people in love with the idea of DIY at a low enough price to push them over the edge into embarking on it but doesn't matter it won't really do the job properly as they probably won't manage to enough to notice it's no good for the job.

You need trade quality so blue Bosch, De Walt (trade Black & Decker), Makita, Milwaulkhee, Hitachi, Panasonic maybe some Ryobi. In common with what's been said already I favour Hitachi but don't buy any cheap deals with the post style li-on batteries as they are obsolete and they have moved to new slide on.

You want li-on cordless don't bother with anything else corded/Nimh etc. As to the type of drill you need to work out what you want most chances are you really need impact driver, a regular drill and and SDS if you're serious but could maybe getaway with the middle one only but if you ever need to put a serious hole in concrete or something you'll need an SDS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok toolmaniacs, I'm interested in getting a new drill.

Chances are your last cordless one had a NiCad battery. If I had only one drill I'd get a cordless model but with one, maybe two Lithium-Ion batteries. They're miles better in all respects.

A hammer option is an essentially option for masonry. And to be able to turn it off for gentler drilling/ driving.

Hilti/ Hitach are reliable brands but the tradespeople in my family all use Makita. Very decent kit.

As it happens I picked up a Stanley driver from Homebase on special at £80 last week. This one here. I mention it because I've encountered a few people who enthuse about De Walt gear and reckon its worth the premiums associated with the brand and don't quite seem to realise De Walt/ Black and Decker/ Stanley are all part of the same group. Here's a De Walt driver that looks suspiciously similar (with a a couple of slight differences) to the Stanley I just picked up.

Generally speaking, and there are many who'd disagree, I steer clear from Bosch as a brand these days. I've encountered a few not that old Bosch power tools that have died a premature death and some Bosch consumables I've used weren't that long-lasting and, in the case of a strimmer, proprietary.

edit: ah, SNACR beat me (mostly) to it. I think we agree, mostly (phew)

edit #2:

Depends upon your budget, but I really like Hitachi

Comparing the battery capacity and torque with the Stanley/ De Walt models I mentioned that's a ****ing beast of a thing. In a good way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think my green Bosch must be twenty years old! I don't make holes for a living so it's good enough for me! I think it cost about £80 back then! Avoid the £19.99 ones. They make about three holes, and break!

If you do any concrete or bricks you will want a hammer action with half inch chuck! Battery ones do not have this!

If you really want to make a big hole through the wall, for example, as I did for the washing machine waste pipe, then I hired an "Arnie" sized one, complete with "building site" transformer, and the job was done in 15 minutes!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All that was said is good advice

edit #2:

Comparing the battery capacity and torque with the Stanley/ De Walt models I mentioned that's a ****ing beast of a thing. In a good way.

So long as you avoid the Hitachi budget consumer models and the 'cheap deals' sold by the likes of Screwfix around the times of year when wives by presents for husbands ;) - I do find that the professional grade Hitachi drills are well designed, up for the job, and a pleasure to use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dewalt.

I have a cordless drill for every day stuff (curtain polls etc) my old man has a 240v drill for the heavier stuff. A good set of sharp drill bits are a must and are often overlooked.

Be careful is your minded to go for professional stuff as it often comes in 110v and will require a step down transformer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dewalt.

I have a cordless drill for every day stuff (curtain polls etc) my old man has a 240v drill for the heavier stuff. A good set of sharp drill bits are a must and are often overlooked.

Be careful is your minded to go for professional stuff as it often comes in 110v and will require a step down transformer.

You can "borrow" one from any building site, and the cost of one is not too high, if you bought your own! :huh: The trick with them is they are centre tapped, so each wire is only 55 volts away from earth potential! Deemed "non-lethal", and probably a good idea for a damp/wet environment. Actually I don't like 230 volts in a bathroom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a tradesman and Not impressed with new Makita stuff.

Have a look at AEG, bought an 18v li-ion drill/driver set that beats my old Makita 18v li-ion 'Anniversary' set in every way.

I have a second hand 110V Makita SDS drill that I was given and had refurbished. This is a good bit of kit, as is most of their older stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a tradesman and Not impressed with new Makita stuff.

Have a look at AEG, bought an 18v li-ion drill/driver set that beats my old Makita 18v li-ion 'Anniversary' set in every way.

Ok, you drill holes a lot, so your advice would be good!

Personally II would rather have a mains powered one, although I appreciate the rechargeable ones can be very useful in certain circumstances! Do we know whether the OP requires a portable one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My needs:

Occasional use, I'd prefer to be able to put a large hole in anything I'd likely encounter around and outside a house, including concrete and property bulls. I'm not going to be installing huge stuff, but if I fancy drilling a bracket for a padlock into the concrete garage floorpad it would be nice to have the option if it were possible with the same tool I can mount a towelrail with, and chisel plaster, tiles, off with etc. Corded electrical is my preference as I doubt I'd use it enough to keep the batteries in good condition. My current drill is a cordless one which barely functions on softwood anymore.

You are in danger of being swamped by well meaning advice. :)

There are three main types of corded drills these days:

Percussion - the traditional hammer drill with a key to tighten the chuck. Uses conventional bits and will allow you to drill masonry and concrete with hammer action on (or off), wood and metal with hammer switched off. Can also drive screws if it has variable speed.

SDS - (as in the example you give) has a keyless chuck for use with special SDS bits. Used for drilling concrete and masonry only.

SDS with Rotostop. Bigger and heavier, the rotation can be switched off leaving the hammer action on. This allows you to chisel concrete, plaster, tiles etc.

In addition, there are impact drivers which don't have a chuck as such, they use hex shaft bits and are mainly used for rapid high torque driving of nuts, bolts and screws.

All the above can also be had in cordless versions.

Based on your requirements, the best fit is a corded percussion drill but you will have to forgo the chiseling.

I have lots or expensive Makita and blue Bosch kit. You don't need to spend that sort of money for your needs.

The best budget option would be to wait for Lidl to have this on offer again:

http://www.lidl.co.uk/cps/rde/SID-F802B8A2-A9352051/www_lidl_uk/hs.xsl/our-offers-2491.htm?action=showDetail&id=8992

3 year guarantee. Take it back if it breaks.

That said, £80 puts you in reach of Hitach, entry Makita. The crucial thing that many people overlook is that good quality bits make more of a difference to the performance than the badge on the drill. Avoid the kits with a gazillion bits for a tenner and buy good ones individually or in a pack of 5 or 6.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Based on your requirements, the best fit is a corded percussion drill but you will have to forgo the chiseling.

I have lots or expensive Makita and blue Bosch kit. You don't need to spend that sort of money for your needs.

The best budget option would be to wait for Lidl to have this on offer again:

http://www.lidl.co.uk/cps/rde/SID-F802B8A2-A9352051/www_lidl_uk/hs.xsl/our-offers-2491.htm?action=showDetail&id=8992

3 year guarantee. Take it back if it breaks.

That said, £80 puts you in reach of Hitach, entry Makita. The crucial thing that many people overlook is that good quality bits make more of a difference to the performance than the badge on the drill. Avoid the kits with a gazillion bits for a tenner and buy good ones individually or in a pack of 5 or 6.

Like spanners! Three good ones in the size you need, are worth a shedload more than a "complete kit" of sizes you didn't want, made of soft cheese! :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bought a 20 quid one from homebase for drilling metal.

It's lasted me years, but the earthing tab snapped off on the charger so you need to fiddle a bit to insert the plug.

The bits are far more important than the drill. The bits I use cost far more than the drill did.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like spanners! Three good ones in the size you need, are worth a shedload more than a "complete kit" of sizes you didn't want, made of soft cheese! :blink:

Even "bad" spanners are good. It is hard to fu when making a spanner. Even the lower quality ones last me for ages.

Screwdrivers - that's where having quality makes a real difference. Pliers as well, especially delicate thin nosed ones.

Any thing that is thin/sharp needs to be made out of good quality steel to last. To make it out of this stuff is expensive. So thin blades/screwdrivers/long nosed pliers/drills all suffer massively if made out of cheap low quality materials.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even "bad" spanners are good. It is hard to fu when making a spanner. Even the lower quality ones last me for ages.

Screwdrivers - that's where having quality makes a real difference. Pliers as well, especially delicate thin nosed ones.

Any thing that is thin/sharp needs to be made out of good quality steel to last. To make it out of this stuff is expensive. So thin blades/screwdrivers/long nosed pliers/drills all suffer massively if made out of cheap low quality materials.

You never use them do you? ;)

I agree on the screwdrivers! Don't use them as chisels. :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You never use them do you? ;)

I agree on the screwdrivers! Don't use them as chisels. :blink:

As it happens Mr Pin I have a set of chisel drivers which I do the most disgusting and degrading things to...

Wera 018282 Kraftform 900 Set Chisel Driver 4 SL/2 PH (6 Pieces)

edit: In a similar vein, as someone who takes his cutlery seriously, I was going to say something about never using knives as lid openers. Then I remembered Hultafors do these.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You never use them do you? ;)

I agree on the screwdrivers! Don't use them as chisels. :blink:

Not much !

I have the added advantage that most of the materials I use them on are soft (ally nuts for example) whereas most normal people use them on very hard materials.

If you have soft spanners or nuts the important thing is to get the size right, because otherwise you will chew up the softer one.

I also have a set of titanium tools. Beat that tool-boasters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As it happens Mr Pin I have a set of chisel drivers which I do the most disgusting and degrading things to...

I have real chisels for woodwork.

I think my point on this pointless thread is buy a drill that is "good enough". You won't be using it that often! No "normal" person needs building site stuff, but those flimsy doings won't last!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Best not attempt a job without the right tools.......what happened to all the tool rental businesses where you could rent the best for the period needed, say a couple of days?.....does every household need to buy individual top notch tools if only to use them once or twice in five years......buy the best you can of the basics and rent or borrow the rest. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest eight

Dewalt.

I have a cordless drill for every day stuff (curtain polls etc) my old man has a 240v drill for the heavier stuff. A good set of sharp drill bits are a must and are often overlooked.

Be careful is your minded to go for professional stuff as it often comes in 110v and will require a step down transformer.

Good point (no pun intended). I work with MDF a lot and the bits are much more important than the drill/driver.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not much !

I also have a set

of titanium tools. Beat that tool-boasters.

I'm not a "tool boaster", although I might be a boasitng tool"! :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have real chisels for woodwork.

I think my point on this pointless thread is buy a drill that is "good enough". You won't be using it that often! No "normal" person needs building site stuff, but those flimsy doings won't last!

I completely agree Mr Pin. The kit I use a lot I spend money on. Occasional use items only as much as is required not to end up with total junk.

Re. drills, a corded model does have the potential to outlive the batteries on a cordless job and you do usually get more power for your £ with a corded drill. What swings it for me is that half the jobs I use a drill/ driver for are outside. Plus one less cord snaking around does cut down on the risk of inadvertent silent comedy routines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trailing cords can be a nuisance or hazard sometimes, especially when 'working at height'. Also, I sometimes use a cordless outdoors when it is raining lightly, whcih i would not consider if using a mains-powered device.

Also getting a hand-drill (manual) is a no-brainer. They are dirt cheap, quick to use, and give you an excellent level of control for delicate jobs. Get a decent one with two bevel gears.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   206 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.