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Previous Owners Buried In The Garden

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I was sent details of this house today:

http://www.zoopla.co.uk/for-sale/details/31554863?search_identifier=198d1398b1762d5a0aba591ce6cf365d

My first thought was that it is not as ridiculously priced as I have become used to in this area - 1,700 sqft and a reasonable garden is unusual in Teddington.

It is not until you read the details that you realise that the previous owners are buried in the back garden! I wonder how much effect this has had on the price and how long it will take to sell?

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I was sent details of this house today:

http://www.zoopla.co.uk/for-sale/details/31554863?search_identifier=198d1398b1762d5a0aba591ce6cf365d

My first thought was that it is not as ridiculously priced as I have become used to in this area - 1,700 sqft and a reasonable garden is unusual in Teddington.

It is not until you read the details that you realise that the previous owners are buried in the back garden! I wonder how much effect this has had on the price and how long it will take to sell?

Interesting looking house, but it looks like it needs a lot of work for 650,000. TBH I'd be rather pleased about the unusual garden feature...

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No good for me. Suspect it would make my plans for a ground source heat pump plans a lot more complicated.

Then there is the matter of asking price and expense of the obvious improvement work required, that I can't comprehend.

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Wouldn't really bother me that the garden has some permanent incumbents. I actually wonder if it's a full burial or just the ashes. Either way I don't think I'd be overly concerned.

I wouldn't but the property though, but that's just me as I have a thing about things sitting square and this one has those sloping walls.

What surprises me more is that it's council tax banded as C. My house is a small mid terrace and rated at E.

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How would anyone ever know IF, after buying it and moving in, you didn't just dig em up quietly and discreetly - and dispose of them elsewhere!?

Edited by anonguest

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How would anyone ever know IF, after buying it and moving in, you didn't just dig em up quietly and discreetly - and dispose of them elsewhere!?

Why bother?

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There's a big difference between ashes scattered in the garden and hitting a rotting coffin when you're installing a rotary washing line. :o

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There's a big difference between ashes scattered in the garden and hitting a rotting coffin when you're installing a rotary washing line. :o

That's either a very shallow grave or a very long pole.

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'buried'....I doubt it.

You can't just bury people anywhere as though they were your pet hamster.

Probably means the ashes.

Perhaps done back in the long distant days when people could do those sorts of things - and build their own homes pretty much whererever they bought their land! :D

Edited by anonguest

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Judging by the age of the house....perhaps done back in the long distant days when people could do those sorts of things - and build their own homes pretty much wherever they bought their land! :D

Edited by anonguest

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Mmmm

http://www.funeralhe...den-burial.html

Garden Burial - Article 1

This is from the website www.gardenlaw.co.uk

It is possible to bury a loved one in your garden

The law is contained in the Burial Laws Amendment Act 1880. A person who knows the circumstances of the death and has a lawful certificate of the cause of death must first register a death with the Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages.

It is then necessary to obtain consent from the local authority to enable the burial to take place. A body comes within the definition of "clinical waste" and as such cannot be disposed of except under the provisions of the Control of Pollution Act 1974 and the Environment Protection Act 1990. A licensed operator is usually needed but a local authority may waive the requirement in special circumstances. Remember it is a criminal offence to dispose of "controlled waste" otherwise than in accordance with the Acts. Before you consider such a burial stop and THINK what you would do if you ever decided to move?

Ashes

These can be freely scattered in the garden or buried in a container eg.under a favourite tree.

Headstone

So long as they are not too near a highway or over a certain height, planning permission is not needed to put up a headstone in a garden.

Pets

In general terms a pet owner can bury his pet in the garden of the domestic property where the pet lived so long as it is not within the definition of hazardous waste. If in doubt enquire of the local authority.

There are a further 2 articles at that site which tend to suggest it is not all that difficult. Some great advice on designing your hole and feature and how far from the drains you need to dig if anyone is interested.

I suspect it is bodies as if it was ashes why mention it all!!

Last paragraph is revealing..

What if my family moves house?

It would be wise to inform a potential buyer that the land contains a burial at the earliest opportunity. Although this may mean that the market value will be reduced, or a potential sale will not be completed, it will prevent the accidental disturbance of the grave if, for example there are any building works in the future.

It should also be remembered that the new owner of the property would be entitled to apply to the Ministry of Justice for a licence to exhume the deceased. The licence application process does make provision for the wishes of the next of kin of the deceased to be taken into account, so there is no guarantee that a licence will be granted, but it is less likely that someone who purchases property knowing that the land contains a burial would make an application.

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'buried'....I doubt it.

You can't just bury people anywhere as though they were your pet hamster.

Probably means the ashes.

Well, yes, but that hardly seems worth mentioning. Besides, it's not as hard as you think... (although even some councils make an assumption that it's illegal without checking the legislation - bottom line, you don't need planning permission but you do have to put it on the deeds, and you should consult with regard to water tables).

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/3630221.stm

http://www.gardenlaw.co.uk/gardenburial.html

edit: geezer beat me to it.

Edited by tomandlu

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Well, yes, but that hardly seems worth mentioning. Besides, it's not as hard as you think... (although even some councils make an assumption that it's illegal without checking the legislation - bottom line, you don't need planning permission but you do have to put it on the deeds, and you should consult with regard to water tables).

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/3630221.stm

http://www.gardenlaw.co.uk/gardenburial.html

edit: geezer beat me to it.

Still doesn't answer my question though! :D

Edited by anonguest

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What surprises me more is that it's council tax banded as C. My house is a small mid terrace and rated at E.

I hadn't noticed that. It appears that most of the 2 bed flats in the area are at least band D whilst being around £400k, and much smaller terraced houses than this are E or F.

It is in the Richmond borough, though, so any saving will be minimal.

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I hadn't noticed that. It appears that most of the 2 bed flats in the area are at least band D whilst being around £400k, and much smaller terraced houses than this are E or F.

It is in the Richmond borough, though, so any saving will be minimal.

Whats the problem? Unless the depth of soil is shallow they should be at least 6ft under. They ain't gonna get up in the night - zombies are only real in the commercial sense.

A friend has a church with bodies under the floor, in the walls and the garden. As the soil isn't deep enough they ones in the garden are a couple of feet down :-)

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I'd imagine that the costs of exhumation and re-interal of the bodies could be quite significant, if you weren't happy having corpses buried in your garden.

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I'd imagine that the costs of exhumation and re-interal of the bodies could be quite significant, if you weren't happy having corpses buried in your garden.

Hence my question earlier! :lol:

Edited by anonguest

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It strikes me as completely irrational that a human body is regarded by the law as being clinical waste (and thus subject to regulation as to how you dispose of it), but that of a domestic animal is not. The corpse of a large dog has around the same volume of biomass as one of a small human (and in the case of Kim Jong "Who let the dogs out?" Un, two in one!), and both are capable of carrying pathogens that are a threat to humans and the environment.

I'm guessing that the reason is essentially political and emotional rather than scientific. Any local authority that tried to stop people from burying Fido or Tibbles in the back garden would face a similar backlash to the ones they face over bins and parking (nanny state gone mad etc), added to which it would be very difficult to enforce (unless a search for pet bodies was made a mandatory part of surveys). But the prospect of doing likewise with Granny would elicit enough of a "gross factor" for such regulation to be supported.

Our cat died when I was a teeenager (thankfully of natural causes, peacefully and at home, aged 23), and Mother asked me to bury him under his favourite tree in the back garden. Despite digging at least 2-3 feet down, foxes dug him up a few days later, and I then had his half-eaten corpse to deal with. If I'm ever in that position again, the corpse is going straight to the vet for cremation.

Edited by The Ayatollah Buggeri

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It strikes me as completely irrational that a human body is regarded by the law as being clinical waste (and thus subject to regulation as to how you dispose of it), but that of a domestic animal is not. The corpse of a large dog has around the same volume of biomass as one of a small human (and in the case of Kim Jong "Who let the dogs out?" Un, two in one!), and both are capable of carrying pathogens that are a threat to humans and the environment.

I'm guessing that the reason is essentially political and emotional rather than scientific. Any local authority that tried to stop people from burying Fido or Tibbles in the back garden would face a similar backlash to the ones they face over bins and parking (nanny state gone mad etc), added to which it would be very difficult to enforce (unless a search for pet bodies was made a mandatory part of surveys). But the prospect of doing likewise with Granny would elicit enough of a "gross factor" for such regulation to be supported.

Our cat died when I was a teeenager (thankfully of natural causes, peacefully and at home, aged 23), and Mother asked me to bury him under his favourite tree in the back garden. Despite digging at least 2-3 feet down, foxes dug him up a few days later, and I then had his half-eaten corpse to deal with. If I'm ever in that position again, the corpse is going straight to the vet for cremation.

Errrr....why not a metal bin, douse with petrol and a match? Seriously!

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Errrr....why not a metal bin, douse with petrol and a match? Seriously!

If you can ever get to see it, look at the opening scene of this movie, in which Russian troops repeatedly try and fail to affect a DIY cremation of Hitler's corpse. Cremation is actually a much more difficult process than you might expect, requiring very high temperatures to be maintained over a long time if you actually want to reduce the corpse to ashes. A few years ago some Hindus in Newcastle asked the local council for permission to perform a traditional Hindu cremation in a public park. They were refused, partly beacuse the local BNP-ers would have had a field day, but also because in India they use specially selected and cured wood to ensure that the actual cremation is done properly, which these people didn't have access to.

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