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Stop Buying New Appliances And Cars And Repair Them Instead, Government Adviser Says

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Telegraph 8/1/14

'British families should stop buying new cars, fridges and washing machines and instead repair them when they fail in a bid to save the environment, a senior Government adviser has said. Professor David MacKay, the energy department's chief scientific adviser, said that electronic equipment and cars should be kept for as long as possible and then disassembled so that components can be recycled.

Householders "buying lots of stuff and then throwing it away" make it "difficult" for ministers to reduce the country's energy consumption, Prof MacKay said.

Officials believe that re-using household appliances and furniture could save families £1 billion a year as well as create work for repair shops across the country.

Around £17 billion could also be saved from the annual budgets of British businesses by reducing waste, a Government analysis has said.

Asked about the "major challenges" of his role advising the Government, Prof Mackay told a Department of Energy and Climate Change newsletter: "One difficult challenge is the way in which economic activity and growth currently is coupled to buying lots of stuff and then throwing it away.

"When a fridge, clothes-washer, or microwave develops a fault we throw it away instead of repairing it. Car manufacturers love us to buy a new car every few years."'

Edited by Sancho Panza

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WFT is that going to do for GDP and the likes of Curry's who survive on repeated business.

Washing machines are designed to fail after around 2-4 years.

I went for ISE washing machine with a 10 year guarantee as I calculated it was cheaper than buying a new washing every couple of years.

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Telegraph 8/1/14

'British families should stop buying new cars, fridges and washing machines and instead repair them when they fail in a bid to save the environment, a senior Government adviser has said. Professor David MacKay, the energy department's chief scientific adviser, said that electronic equipment and cars should be kept for as long as possible and then disassembled so that components can be recycled.

Householders "buying lots of stuff and then throwing it away" make it "difficult" for ministers to reduce the country's energy consumption, Prof MacKay said.

Officials believe that re-using household appliances and furniture could save families £1 billion a year as well as create work for repair shops across the country.

Around £17 billion could also be saved from the annual budgets of British businesses by reducing waste, a Government analysis has said.

Asked about the "major challenges" of his role advising the Government, Prof Mackay told a Department of Energy and Climate Change newsletter: "One difficult challenge is the way in which economic activity and growth currently is coupled to buying lots of stuff and then throwing it away.

"When a fridge, clothes-washer, or microwave develops a fault we throw it away instead of repairing it. Car manufacturers love us to buy a new car every few years."'

It's Kwik fit economics.

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Telegraph 8/1/14

'British families should stop buying new cars, fridges and washing machines and instead repair them when they fail in a bid to save the environment, a senior Government adviser has said. Professor David MacKay, the energy department's chief scientific adviser, said that electronic equipment and cars should be kept for as long as possible and then disassembled so that components can be recycled.

Householders "buying lots of stuff and then throwing it away" make it "difficult" for ministers to reduce the country's energy consumption, Prof MacKay said.

Officials believe that re-using household appliances and furniture could save families £1 billion a year as well as create work for repair shops across the country.

Around £17 billion could also be saved from the annual budgets of British businesses by reducing waste, a Government analysis has said.

Asked about the "major challenges" of his role advising the Government, Prof Mackay told a Department of Energy and Climate Change newsletter: "One difficult challenge is the way in which economic activity and growth currently is coupled to buying lots of stuff and then throwing it away.

"When a fridge, clothes-washer, or microwave develops a fault we throw it away instead of repairing it. Car manufacturers love us to buy a new car every few years."'

Oh dear, see what happens when you let a scientist open their gob? The common sense pours out. Just as well for Osborne the proles ain't listening though.

Edited by The B.L.T.

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WFT is that going to do for GDP and the likes of Curry's who survive on repeated business.

Washing machines are designed to fail after around 2-4 years.

I went for ISE washing machine with a 10 year guarantee as I calculated it was cheaper than buying a new washing every couple of years.

...could be that the cost of say two repairs are built into the cost of the appliance offering a 10 year guarantee.....different types of jobs/gdp created in repair and parts work, both helps the environment by saving on the waste of tons of scrap metal/energy that is not recycled going into land fill. ;)

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Oh dear, see what happens when you let a scientist open their gob? The common sense pours out. Just as well for Osborne the proles ain't listening though.

Depends..

Cars I can understand; the problem with appliances is that they are too reliable. I've never had a fridge or freezer break down. Washing machines yes, we are on our third in 13 years - but that's not a vast expense. Recently sold a 10-year-old tumble dryer on eBay.

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WFT is that going to do for GDP and the likes of Curry's who survive on repeated business.

Washing machines are designed to fail after around 2-4 years.

I went for ISE washing machine with a 10 year guarantee as I calculated it was cheaper than buying a new washing every couple of years.

Obviously a design fault then as I have NEVER had (or know of anyone else who has) a washing machine that has conked out after such a short period..

You're not buying British, are you?.. :P

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One difficult challenge is the way in which economic activity and growth currently is coupled to buying lots of stuff and then throwing it away.

actually, it isn't

maybe publc sector annual budgeting is, but for most of us that isn't the economy

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Obviously a design fault then as I have NEVER had (or know of anyone else who has) a washing machine that has conked out after such a short period..

You're not buying British, are you?.. :P

Little tip for all...just put half a bottle of vinegar in your machine once a month and run at 60c. Machines generally fail due to limescale build up and minor circuit board failures. The limescale you can do something about. My machines has been going for 10 years in a 4 person household...just buy German/Korean/Japanese they do tend to work with a less short term business model in the East. China too is realising that they need to move up the value chain to have sustained long term growth.

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Depends..

Cars I can understand; the problem with appliances is that they are too reliable. I've never had a fridge or freezer break down. Washing machines yes, we are on our third in 13 years - but that's not a vast expense. Recently sold a 10-year-old tumble dryer on eBay.

Depends what's wring with them too, I replaced a washing machine motor a few years back, it was easy but cost £90 for the part. Still cheaper than buying a replacement but enough to make people think about doing so, especially if they cannot diy and pay the labour on top.

Cars are a nobrainer except for the squeeze on older models via taxation and other idiocy like scrappage( I expect the CO2 system will act like a rolling scrappage scheme as the bands are tightened up).

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Little tip for all...just put half a bottle of vinegar in your machine once a month and run at 60c. Machines generally fail due to limescale build up and minor circuit board failures. The limescale you can do something about. My machines has been going for 10 years in a 4 person household...just buy German/Korean/Japanese they do tend to work with a less short term business model in the East. China too is realising that they need to move up the value chain to have sustained long term growth.

Indeed.. and far cheaper than calgol :)

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Timely for me, as I just fixed a wonderful old anglepoise lamp my father in law couldn't be arsed to fix and was going to throw out.

Took ten minutes to identfy the fault (connection within the plug had broken off - needed to cut a bit of the cabling to expose more wire and reconnect) and fix, and a bit of a clean. Job done, 60 quid saved.

My f-in-law is a guy who went across Africa with a crappy car, fixing it on the way and fighting off bandits, so not someone who is not self-reliant. But maybe at 70 we should let him have a break :)

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Little tip for all...just put half a bottle of vinegar in your machine once a month and run at 60c. Machines generally fail due to limescale build up and minor circuit board failures. The limescale you can do something about. My machines has been going for 10 years in a 4 person household...just buy German/Korean/Japanese they do tend to work with a less short term business model in the East. China too is realising that they need to move up the value chain to have sustained long term growth.

I decided to improve on this solution using a 5-gallon mixture of concentrated Nitric and Sulphuric acids. On the plus side, there is absolutely no limescale left. On the minus side... glad I don't live in a top floor flat.

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our 10 year old washing machine had to be replaced last week as daughter leant on the door...broke not only the hinge but the glass as well. Bosch claim to have spares for 10 years, but no-one could supply all 4 parts needed.

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Since we make so little, the route to growth is repairs of foreign made stuff.

Problem is that it's often cheaper to buy a new one.

If they stopped charging VAT on repair costs that`d help.

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As a renter, I always buy the cheapest major brand appliance that I can get to the spec I require, and when moving house roughly every 5 years I am as likely to sell my old kit on 2nd hand and avoid having to move house with it. Additionally, each house move requires different appliances etc so this allows me to get the right bespoke appliances for my needs.

I'm not sure washing machines and fridges like being moved house to house, seem to have limited useful life after a house move

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As a renter, I always buy the cheapest major brand appliance that I can get to the spec I require, and when moving house roughly every 5 years I am as likely to sell my old kit on 2nd hand and avoid having to move house with it. Additionally, each house move requires different appliances etc so this allows me to get the right bespoke appliances for my needs.

I'm not sure washing machines and fridges like being moved house to house, seem to have limited useful life after a house move

Interesting, I always insist on white goods being provided. Can't be assed with the faff/cost of buying, moving, selling etc.

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Interesting, I always insist on white goods being provided. Can't be assed with the faff/cost of buying, moving, selling etc.

Interesting too

It didn't occur to me to consider this, rather that I find a good house and then snap it up as is at best Price before someone else secures it

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Timely for me, as I just fixed a wonderful old anglepoise lamp my father in law couldn't be arsed to fix and was going to throw out.

Took ten minutes to identfy the fault (connection within the plug had broken off - needed to cut a bit of the cabling to expose more wire and reconnect) and fix, and a bit of a clean. Job done, 60 quid saved.

My f-in-law is a guy who went across Africa with a crappy car, fixing it on the way and fighting off bandits, so not someone who is not self-reliant. But maybe at 70 we should let him have a break :)

That's £325 saved then!anglepoise lamp

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Interesting too

It didn't occur to me to consider this, rather that I find a good house and then snap it up as is at best Price before someone else secures it

Amounts to the same I suppose. Often not all of the appliances are 'missing', one place I rented needed a cooker, another a washing machine(new build flat!). both were provided without issue (but the rent was presumably higher than it would otherwise have been).

I once viewed a place where the agent said the white goods were being provided on a 'goodwill basis only' ie when they break, the tenant replaces them at their own cost. edit, given the unknown provenance I wasn't going to take on responsibility for some potentially shagged washing machine.

Edited by The B.L.T.

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Households could save £1bn

Businesses could save £17bn

17x

Households probably shouldn't bother expending any effort on this. Though I'm puzzled by what this chap thinks happens to 3 yr old cars when someone buys a new one.

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Amounts to the same I suppose. Often not all of the appliances are 'missing', one place I rented needed a cooker, another a washing machine(new build flat!). both were provided without issue (but the rent was presumably higher than it would otherwise have been).

I once viewed a place where the agent said the white goods were being provided on a 'goodwill basis only' ie when they break, the tenant replaces them at their own cost. edit, given the unknown provenance I wasn't going to take on responsibility for some potentially shagged washing machine.

Other thing is, I enjoy comparing white goods models and deciding on what I need before then funding online deals for them, each to his own!

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For ten years I lived in a flat that was too small to plumb a proper washing machine in, so I got a little Hinari sink top washer (basically a bucket with a rotating drum inside) plus a separate spin dryer. Total cost £165. When I moved out I sold the two machines to a bloke who lived in a caravan, for £65. Can I be a government adviser as well? :lol:

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Didn't Cameron call on everyone to pay down their credit cards instead of spending more? I think this idea lasted as long as it took him to get to a quiet room where the error of his ways could be pointed out to him.

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