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Obesity Quadruples To Nearly One Billion In Developing World

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-25576400

The number of overweight and obese adults in the developing world has almost quadrupled to around one billion since 1980, says a report from a UK think tank.

The Overseas Development Institute said one in three people worldwide was now overweight and urged governments to do more to influence diets.

In the UK, 64% of adults are classed as being overweight or obese.

..

A total of 904 million people in developing countries are now classed as overweight or above, with a BMI of more than 25, up from 250 million in 1980.

This compares to 557 million in high-income countries. Over the same period, the global population nearly doubled.

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A growing economic brick wall? The long term health costs to destroy economic stability?

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-25576400

A growing economic brick wall? The long term health costs to destroy economic stability?

It's not as bad as they make it sound. They've deliberately conflated overweight and obese for a sensationalist headline, and to make it worse their BMI band definition of overweight isn't even that meaningful.

A 6 foot man weighing over 184 pounds (13 stone, 2 Ounces) fits into their "Overweight or Obese" category.

A BMI of 25 to 30 is considered overweight in the report, but people with a BMI of 25 to 30 may have better health outcomes than people with a BMI under 25 (see systematic review linked below).

I'd be intetested to see how many of them have a BMI over 35 (a 6 foot man at 18 stone, 6 pounds), which is where the increased mortality kicks in according to the systematic review (presumably they mean early mortality, as everybody dies whatever their BMI happens to be)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/23280227/

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[The way they set the thresholds for obesity nowadays, even someone like moi, who can still fit into an M&S size 12, would probably come up as obese. (Yes I know M&S sizes come up bigger than a lot).

Obese to me means the massive lardarses waddling round Asda's with trolleys full of oven chips, pizzas and Coke. Often with fat kids in tow, sucking on sweets/stuffing crisps, and often wearing very tight leggings with very short tops so that the gruesome extent of lardarse is thrust in everyone's face, regardless of whether they are of a nervous disposition.

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There is a piece on the Telegraph website with a striking graph of male and female obesity rates versus income quintile in the UK. The article text says that obesity is unequivocally linked to poverty but for males at least the chart shows this to be a lie- the obesity rate for males is remarkably consistent at between 24%-29% across the quintiles. No uncertainties are quoted on the figures though but it strongly points to income being independent of obesity.

For women there is a clear relationship- rates drop from about 30% in the lowest income quintile to about 18% in the upper quintile. In light of the male result it might be to do with social factors though- skint blokes don't get skinny ladies, rather than income per say.

I thought this was interesting as it flies in the face of accepted wisdom, even to the point the reporter failed to spot the inconsistency.

Malnutrition is a diffetent matter of course.

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