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debtlessmanc

Ba Plane Crash In Sa

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Sorry it's from the wail, thankfully no one seriously hurt- but the most interesting aspect of this (as the comments point out) is that the twitterer, who is "head of media" for oxfam, was clearly sat in business. So not only wasting charitable but money, but showing everyone she know f*** all about how to deal with the media.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2528213/Take-drama-BA-jet-bound-London-hits-airport-building.html

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Sorry it's from the wail, thankfully no one seriously hurt- but the most interesting aspect of this (as the comments point out) is that the twitterer, who is "head of media" for oxfam, was clearly sat in business. So not only wasting charitable but money, but showing everyone she know f*** all about how to deal with the media.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2528213/Take-drama-BA-jet-bound-London-hits-airport-building.html

And she was whinging about the people in First class being let off before her!

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So the pilot took a wrong turning or misunderstood his instructions?

They carried straight on when they should have beared borne??? turned left.

Taxi chart from JNB below. Note Caution 1!

faor_taxi.jpg

post-8051-0-47902200-1387808348_thumb.jpg

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They carried straight on when they should have beared borne??? turned left.

Taxi chart from JNB below. Note Caution 1!

faor_taxi.jpg

Too thick to be entrusted with a jet load of passengers?

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Is the plane a write-off?

There's quite a bit of speculation going on about that in the biz and among plane geeks. It's done 105k hours, against a designed lifetime of 120k. All of BA's 747-400s are around 20 years old and are coming up for retirement in the next few years; however, that particular aircraft had recently been repainted and was not on the list to be retired in 2014, implying that it has at least been C-checked relatively recently. The bottom line is that it'll come down to the cost of repairing it in relation to its airworthy value (i.e. what it would have been worth, undamaged, at the time of the accident). If it can be fixed for substantially less the price of a 747-400 of a similar age, condition and remaining useful hours and cycles before it would either need to be D-checked or scrapped on the used plane market, then it'll be fixed. If not, the insurers will scrap it, pocket whatever they can make in scrap metal and recyclable parts, and pay BA what it would cost to buy an equivalent (before the crash) used plane.

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And she was whinging about the people in First class being let off before her!

Pretty much

Nice work being near the top of a charity

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Pretty much

Nice work being near the top of a charity

I'm no fan of "charities", but FWIW if you bother to check the Twitter page of the person in question, she later clarifies that she was on a personal trip. Whether anyone working for a charity should be making enough money to jet off to South Africa for Xmas is a question for another thread!

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If she was on a private trip, she shouldn't have allowed her job title to be used in the media coverage (as in, she should have told interviewers that she was a private traveller and refused to say what her job was, if asked). I'd speculate that vanity got the better of her, and she felt that being identified as a relatively senior person in a multinational organisation would result in her being taken seriously in a way that she wouldn't otherwise.

When I was interviewed by the local paper in Portland while stuck at the airport during the 2010 ash cloud, the reporter asked me what my job was. I asked her simply to describe me as "a university lecturer from England", which is exactly what she did when she wrote up the story. This woman could equally have described herself as "a charity worker from London", or some such phrase.

As for the plane (according to my sister, who flies air ambulances and bizjets, but knows BA people), it's almost certainly a write-off. Apparently engineers examining it have established that the wing spar was bent in the crash, meaning that the airframe would virtually have to be disassembled down to the last fastener and rebuilt in order to be airworthy again. The cost of that would not be much less than that of a new jumbo (and there would even be a question mark as to whether it would be possible to move the plane to a facility at which this could be done - it could not be done in situ at JNB airport), and vastly more than this 20 year-old plane with more than 100k hours on the clock was worth before the accident. Of course the insurance loss adjuster has to agree with that assessment, but this is expected to be a formality.

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If she was on a private trip, she shouldn't have allowed her job title to be used in the media coverage (as in, she should have told interviewers that she was a private traveller and refused to say what her job was, if asked). I'd speculate that vanity got the better of her, and she felt that being identified as a relatively senior person in a multinational organisation would result in her being taken seriously in a way that she wouldn't otherwise.

When I was interviewed by the local paper in Portland while stuck at the airport during the 2010 ash cloud, the reporter asked me what my job was. I asked her simply to describe me as "a university lecturer from England", which is exactly what she did when she wrote up the story. This woman could equally have described herself as "a charity worker from London", or some such phrase.

As for the plane (according to my sister, who flies air ambulances and bizjets, but knows BA people), it's almost certainly a write-off. Apparently engineers examining it have established that the wing spar was bent in the crash, meaning that the airframe would virtually have to be disassembled down to the last fastener and rebuilt in order to be airworthy again. The cost of that would not be much less than that of a new jumbo (and there would even be a question mark as to whether it would be possible to move the plane to a facility at which this could be done - it could not be done in situ at JNB airport), and vastly more than this 20 year-old plane with more than 100k hours on the clock was worth before the accident. Of course the insurance loss adjuster has to agree with that assessment, but this is expected to be a formality.

In that case it would need scrapping locally somehow? I wonder if there is a specialist industry that does this?

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