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Guest eight

Needlecrafts For Men

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Guest eight

My daughter, who is five, is increasingly getting into dancing, and might actually be quite good. The cost of the various outfits can be a bit high though, and frankly I suspect it's money for old rope and I could do equally as well. I have a vague idea that as a sort of new year's resolution I might learn to sew. I am a middle aged man. Too weird, or what?

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My daughter, who is five, is increasingly getting into dancing, and might actually be quite good. The cost of the various outfits can be a bit high though, and frankly I suspect it's money for old rope and I could do equally as well. I have a vague idea that as a sort of new year's resolution I might learn to sew. I am a middle aged man. Too weird, or what?

As long as you aren't too disappointed if she doesn't exactly enthuse over the V-necked pair of socks in two different sizes that you - as a man - will inevitably produce for her, then go for it mate.

Otherwise, leave these matters to the ladies would be my advice...

;)

XYY

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I used to do it for GCSE Art and Design. I was pretty much the only lad in the school who did needlecraft voluntarily. I remember it being very therapeutic, if hard on the finger tips (I could never get on with thimbles). A fringe benefit was that the classes were also a source of fascinating insight into the female mind as they tended to forget I was there. My subjects tended to be rather different from the rest of the class though. While they were doing landscapes, horses and roses - I did a tapestry/collage of two rats fighting. I really should get back into it again.

In short, any craft thought of as traditionally female can be OK for blokes, it's all about the approach. eBay might be easier though.

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I'm keen on sewing. I've attended a few courses (yes I was the only bloke) and thoroughly enjoyed it. Made many items of clothing for my children. I will warn you though that you are unlikely to save any money making clothes but on the other hand you will get a lot of satisfaction from it.

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I sew a bit and my grandfather did all the sewing in his household. Tailoring and dressmaking is traditionally a man's craft.

Unforunately my grandfathers had to take care of all the steel-forging and coal-digging duties in their households, and so had to leave making frocks to the experts they were fortunate enough to have married.

One man's man's craft is another man's poison - and probably a terrible use of apostrophes too...!

XYY

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You will need that most manly of contraptions. A sewing machine! :huh:

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Guest eight

I think I'm going to call Social Services.

:lol::lol:

Good (and, I think, probably correct) answer!

It's bad enough having to run the gauntlet of the reception area which doubles as an impromptu changing room and not knowing where to rest your gaze in case you end up seeing something you really don't want to be seeing....

There is one mother there who is considered the "go to" for costumes etc. She made a skirt for my daughter. It was basically a hemmed and elasticated metre of floaty fabric and she charged me thirty quid. She must be raking it in. She might actually be giving the dance teacher a backhander, I don't know. It caused a discussion between me and another father on whether it would be acceptable to try to grab a piece of the action, and how it would be received. I thought it would be a good one for here as it is right at the forefront of the elemental clash between manliness and frugality.

As usual, you lot's responses have not disappointed.

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:lol::lol:

Good (and, I think, probably correct) answer!

It's bad enough having to run the gauntlet of the reception area which doubles as an impromptu changing room and not knowing where to rest your gaze in case you end up seeing something you really don't want to be seeing....

There is one mother there who is considered the "go to" for costumes etc. She made a skirt for my daughter. It was basically a hemmed and elasticated metre of floaty fabric and she charged me thirty quid. She must be raking it in. She might actually be giving the dance teacher a backhander, I don't know. It caused a discussion between me and another father on whether it would be acceptable to try to grab a piece of the action, and how it would be received. I thought it would be a good one for here as it is right at the forefront of the elemental clash between manliness and frugality.

As usual, you lot's responses have not disappointed.

Go for it.

Maybe this other dad is a mechanic or bricklayer or something equally masculine and you can trade your sewing skills for his real skills.

Im so glad you don't have a son to be a role model for.

BTW, this sewing mum will burn you like a witch if she finds out.

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I sew a bit and my grandfather did all the sewing in his household. Tailoring and dressmaking is traditionally a man's craft.

That's thing though, when you think about gender roles, the two obvious female ones are Dress Making and Cooking, however a vast majority of the most world renowned in both are men.

Christina Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Paul Poiret, Yves Saint Laurent, Giorgio Armani, Gianni Versace, Alexander McQueen, Julien Macdonald, the list is endless.

Alain Ducasse, Roux Brothers, Michel Troisgros, Ferran Adira and of course not forgetting Ainsley Harriot

Obviously there are plenty of women, Coco Chanel, Stella McCartney, Vivienne Westwood and so on in fashion and food Nigella Lawson, Delia Smith, although in the cooking world there are very few world respected female chefs given it's seen as a women job.

As for you eight, go for it.

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If you're going to do it, do it like a man and improve on the process. It's obvious from a cursory glance that current methods are unproductive, the materials totally unsuitable and the finished garments are prone to damage and offer little or no impact protection. Forget sewing machines, you need a Tig welder, autoclave and some suitable sheet materials. You've probably already got the rivets, bolts, epoxy resin etc but given it's a girl, you'll also need pink and purple paint.

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Isn't it just, Sarah.

Oops, I've said too much!

Sequins are lovely and sparkly :)

I used to do beadwork but find I can only do about 5 minutes every 6 months because of an old neck injury.

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The girls school I attended taught needlework and home economics very well.....over the years this has paid dividends, art, decorating and maths was not bad either. ;)

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Sewign isn't hard. Sewing sequins on is more boring than you could ever imagine though.

Not merely queen of the allotment, but a domestic goddess! <_<

ISTR a bit of knitting and sewing, probably sometime before I hit the age of "boys don't do that". But long since lost any little skill I might've had beyond replacing a button. How is a chap supposed to resist a woman's "give it here, I'll do that"?

(Happy to say I do cook, and am well over the confidence threshold needed to hold my own in a kitchen).

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Not merely queen of the allotment, but a domestic goddess! <_<

ISTR a bit of knitting and sewing, probably sometime before I hit the age of "boys don't do that". But long since lost any little skill I might've had beyond replacing a button. How is a chap supposed to resist a woman's "give it here, I'll do that"?

(Happy to say I do cook, and am well over the confidence threshold needed to hold my own in a kitchen).

:-)

I'm normally an experimental cook,don't weigh or stick to recipes, but it all gets eaten.

Sewing (even just buttons) is something kids should learn at school.

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1387754771[/url]' post='1102437278']

It'll be fine as long as you are right handed.

That shouldn't be a problem. You can get needles suitable for left handed people now. blink.gif

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