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The Cambridge Graduates Grateful To Earn £7 An Hour As Amazon Drones

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2526054/The-Cambridge-graduates-grateful-earn-7-hour-Amazon-drones-As-Ben-reveals-working-gruelling-shifts-warehouse-job-get.html

....This is not what I thought I'd end up doing, the Christmas after graduating from Jesus College Cambridge with a 2:1 degree in music.

I'd hoped to be an officer in the Royal Navy by now - or earning good money as a jobbing musican, while the application process limped along. But work was irregular and sometimes badly paid. I tried, and failed, to find other employment and reluctantly had to sign on the dole - something I prayed I'd never have to do.

At Amazon, I am paid £7 an hour and have to work 55 hours a week, with no choice of when I do them. If I'm lucky, though, I can pick between day or night shifts.

Does this mean I'm ungrateful? Certainly not. Nor does it mean I am the only graduate from an elite university working here.

Far from being surrounded by uneducated manual workers, I am pushing my trolley alongside law graduates, classicists and mathematicians, many from top universities like mine.

At what point to you start repaying the loans if you have them. Would 55 hours a week trigger the repayment clause?

Still at least for the Uni you've got a job and that's all what counts in their stats.

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What should someone with a music degree realistically expect to do after leaving Uni.

I'd say, Music teacher.

I know one person with a music degree and they are live off state handouts...they work for the council.

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It's going to turn into an "too many students doing pointless degrees" debate isn't it?

Fair enough, but how about a focus on the "why?" for a change?

Most kids have two options when leaving school now:

1) Get a degree (ANY degree if you're not traditional Uni material), and spend the rest of your life a debt slave.

2) Look for "non-Uni work". Find little. Sign on. Get bullied into accepting a zero-hour drone contract.

3) Accept the lack of work opportunities without a degree. Accept benefits without kids in this country are actually pretty terrible. If you're a woman (or a young couple) pop out a couple of kids sharpish.

He's lucky to have a job offering permanent hours to be frank. 30 years ago he might have not gone to Uni at all and found a non-degree job with some degree of career progression (sorry), but that era is long gone.

If completely smashing the unions in the 80s was entirely positive and "freed" this country, why are we all now not swimming in wealth and jobs? Trickle down my @rse.

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It's going to turn into an "too many students doing pointless degrees" debate isn't it?

Fair enough, but how about a focus on the "why?" for a change?

Most kids have two options when leaving school now:

They should look at the list that the government creates to say what skilled workers we need from outside the UK.

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They should look at the list that the government creates to say what skilled workers we need from outside the UK.

Only useful if they live in a geographical area where those jobs are, or there is some funding (either from parents or state) to relocate them to where that work is.

There often isn't either at 16/18, which is why we end up with slightly older foreign workers.

75% of kids I know who went the "skilled" labour route followed their parents profession (or friends of parents).

If you don't know a plumber, sparkie, or what not, good luck being first in line for training. And why bother training anyone when you can just hire an already trained foreign worker on less money from overseas?

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What does a 2:1 Degree in Music have to do with becoming a Royal Navy Officer?

He's getting a much needed dose of reality, that's all. Another non-story by the DM.

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Only useful if they live in a geographical area where those jobs are, or there is some funding (either from parents or state) to relocate them to where that work is.

Did they live in Cambridge before they did their degree there?

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They should look at the list that the government creates to say what skilled workers we need from outside the UK.

It is *ahem* an interesting question of how a country that sends about 300,000 kids to university every year on one hand, and has official unemployment of over 2 million on the other, could possibly need to import any labour at all, skilled or otherwise.

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Since the industrial revolution, business focus has been on reducing labor costs while the political mantra has been full employment. This is a similar kind of confusion as debt and money, one good one bad, when in fact they are the same thing. Many of the most "successful" corporations actually produce nothing of tangible value. I like the way these grads refer to their coworkers as "uneducated" when in reality neither group has the intellect to create their own employment.

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Did they live in Cambridge before they did their degree there?

Not sure what your point is.

We live in a country where they lend you money to relocate for a degree guaranteed to last at least 3 years.

We don't live in a country where they lend you money to relocate to train for skilled work guaranteed to last at least 3 years.

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If completely smashing the unions in the 80s was entirely positive and "freed" this country, why are we all now not swimming in wealth and jobs? Trickle down my @rse.

That was never the plan, it was the sales pitch.

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That was never the plan, it was the sales pitch.

I'm a Rightie not a Leftie.

I believe in the free market, but unlike a lot of my fellow Righties I recognise that the workers have to win at least some of the time, and I'd rather socialism focussed on improving the lot of those at bottom of the pyramid than at the top.

Smashing workers and their unions entirely and making them powerless just ends up with, well, this. Banks and corporations running the country for themselves. The banking bailout was the biggest socialist event to happen on planet Earth EVER. That's trickled up not down.

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I'm a Rightie not a Leftie.

I believe in the free market, but unlike a lot of my fellow Righties I recognise that the workers have to win at least some of the time, and I'd rather socialism focussed on improving the lot of those at bottom of the pyramid than at the top.

Smashing workers and their unions entirely and making them powerless just ends up with, well, this. Banks and corporations running the country for themselves. The banking bailout was the biggest socialist event to happen on planet Earth EVER. That's trickled up not down.

Well, I consider myself a 'leftie'.. but that doesn't mean I'm completely anti-market. It's just something that has to be seen for what it is, not worshipped as the be-all and end-all.

I always find it strange that those who are most extreme in their free-market views have the least realistic idea of what the human impact will be, or that if there is a market in everything, that quickly includes a market in political influence. And what is the first thing a self-interested market entity will do with political influence.. rig the market.

Unions are just the mirror image of shareholder-corporations, in many ways - Managers/Executives wield power on behalf of a distributed mass of shareholders; Unions wield power on behalf of a mas of workers. That's the theory - but can you imagine the response if Union leaders were given the power to act without consulting members, in the same way that Executives can act without consulting shareholders?

FWIW.. I think that the state should provide basic cheap (or even free) housing, free-at-the-point-of-delivery healthcare and schooling (to 21), make sure that water, energy and transport are cheap and plentiful, and provide a basic Citizen's income.. given that if the basics of life are kept cheap than a CI does not need to be huge. Do that lot and the markets can do the rest..

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Smashing workers and their unions entirely and making them powerless just ends up with, well, this. Banks and corporations running the country for themselves. The banking bailout was the biggest socialist event to happen on planet Earth EVER. That's trickled up not down.

Yes the bank bailout was remarkable. When Rover was going under nothing could be done. The banks get into trouble suddenly hundreds of billions materialise out of thin air.

I don't think it trickled anywhere it was just given to the rich. At least if it had been given those at the bottom first the rich would have had to work hard to fleece it out of them.

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I pay £140-£180 cash/day for trades (carpenters/electricians/roofers) and there aren't enough of them around. It would be better to have a trade-training-loan rather than a student-loan for many. Far better return.

We have totally screwed over the next generation. (I'm in my 40's so rode the house price bubble in time and had no university fees to pay).

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He still hasnt been refused a job as an officer, he is just waiting to hear. I guess this little temp job at amazon is just a little filler before starting his career as an officer. Writing a sob story just gives him a bit of pocket money.

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Well, I consider myself a 'leftie'.. but that doesn't mean I'm completely anti-market. It's just something that has to be seen for what it is, not worshipped as the be-all and end-all.

I always find it strange that those who are most extreme in their free-market views have the least realistic idea of what the human impact will be, or that if there is a market in everything, that quickly includes a market in political influence. And what is the first thing a self-interested market entity will do with political influence.. rig the market.

Unions are just the mirror image of shareholder-corporations, in many ways - Managers/Executives wield power on behalf of a distributed mass of shareholders; Unions wield power on behalf of a mas of workers. That's the theory - but can you imagine the response if Union leaders were given the power to act without consulting members, in the same way that Executives can act without consulting shareholders?

FWIW.. I think that the state should provide basic cheap (or even free) housing, free-at-the-point-of-delivery healthcare and schooling (to 21), make sure that water, energy and transport are cheap and plentiful, and provide a basic Citizen's income.. given that if the basics of life are kept cheap than a CI does not need to be huge. Do that lot and the markets can do the rest..

That's exactly why those on the right are against centralisation because as you say it ends up with the market being rigged.

The left seem to continually call for more state power over the market without realising that it will just end up becoming even more distorted towards the elite, because it is being run by the same sort of people they don't trust to work in a free market. Only in this case you aren't free to say no to their offers.

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What should someone with a music degree realistically expect to do after leaving Uni.

I'd say, Music teacher.

I know one person with a music degree and they are live off state handouts...they work for the council.

Anecdotal

I spoke to a music lecturer at Leeds university who said that the vast majority of their music graduates, if they want them, now get jobs in the music industry; demand is high for jingles, background music, production etc in the new media industries (computer games, mobile devices, etc)

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He still hasnt been refused a job as an officer, he is just waiting to hear. I guess this little temp job at amazon is just a little filler before starting his career as an officer. Writing a sob story just gives him a bit of pocket money.

Yes, that's my take too

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Anecdotal

I spoke to a music lecturer at Leeds university who said that the vast majority of their music graduates, if they want them, now get jobs in the music industry; demand is high for jingles, background music, production etc in the new media industries (computer games, mobile devices, etc)

Unfortunately it's massively cut throat industry with, generally, poor pay. You're better off, imo, becoming a very reliable session musician but you do have to pay your dues for a few years while you build up your reputation and contacts.

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That's exactly why those on the right are against centralisation because as you say it ends up with the market being rigged.

The left seem to continually call for more state power over the market without realising that it will just end up becoming even more distorted towards the elite, because it is being run by the same sort of people they don't trust to work in a free market. Only in this case you aren't free to say no to their offers.

Right or left, it's always rigged.

Private services given "state" jobs to do are still handed them by state elected officials.

That's why where ever possible I favour both. Strong state run services result in strong private alternatives (and vice versa).

Without both it either becomes warped in the way you describe (a state monopoly), or the private companies form a cartel and it functions in a state monopoly manner anyway (the only difference being the government can't do anything directly about it).

We should still have a state run electricity company to keep the private company profiteering in check. The only state run rail service is I believe the cheapest/best run as well.

If a private company can come in and offer a service better and cheaper, then great, let them. If you only have one or the other though things just don't work.

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Right or left, it's always rigged.

Private services given "state" jobs to do are still handed them by state elected officials.

That's why where ever possible I favour both. Strong state run services result in strong private alternatives (and vice versa).

Without both it either becomes warped in the way you describe (a state monopoly), or the private companies form a cartel and it functions in a state monopoly manner anyway (the only difference being the government can't do anything directly about it).

We should still have a state run electricity company to keep the private company profiteering in check. The only state run rail service is I believe the cheapest/best run as well.

If a private company can come in and offer a service better and cheaper, then great, let them. If you only have one or the other though things just don't work.

Trouble is that if you've got to pay for the state run services through tax then you aren't going to consider paying for a private version on top of that. The health service mutuals all went bust after the formation of the NHS for example.

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Yes the bank bailout was remarkable. When Rover was going under nothing could be done. The banks get into trouble suddenly hundreds of billions materialise out of thin air.

I don't think it trickled anywhere it was just given to the rich. At least if it had been given those at the bottom first the rich would have had to work hard to fleece it out of them.

Yes, the amazing availability of money to bail out the banks but not other failed businesses is pretty remarkable to anyone with a bit of intelligence.

But of course, the mainstream media never remarks about it and most people are too obsessed with celebrity culture, trashy TV and sports to give real world things much of a second thought.

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