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Police To Review Rape Case For Which Wrongly Convicted Man Was Jailed

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http://www.theguardian.com/law/2013/dec/16/police-review-rape-case-wrongly-convicted-man-jailed

West Mercia police are to review the original case for which Victor Nealon was wrongly convicted and spent 17 years in prison, the force has confirmed, with DNA evidence pointing to another perpetrator.

Nealon, the former postman who was freed from Wakefield prison on Friday within hours of his conviction being quashed at the court of appeal, told the Guardian he wanted to pursue justice for the victim too: "I want to show my support towards the victim. I want to make clear that the police should reopen this case. I think they owe her an explanation and justice as well."

Nealon, 53, was given a discretionary life sentence in January 1997 for the attempted rape of a 22-year-old woman leaving a nightclub. But when DNA evidence on the victim's clothing was finally tested on the urging of appeal lawyers, the samples belonged to another, unknown man.

..

Originally from Dublin, Nealon was living and working in Redditch, near Worcester, when he was jailed, and made his way back towards the West Midlands. Now homeless, he left prison with a discharge grant of just £46.

He said on Sunday: "I've been destitute and emotionally topsy-turvy. Coming out of prison after 17 years isn't an easy experience."

In a broadcast interview with BBC Hereford and Worcester on Monday morning, Nealon said he was not bitter, despite the injustice he had suffered. "I've seen what bitterness can do; it's like cancer eating a person.

"I have become over the years a little more detached and academic in my attitude to this."

Wakefield is a category A prison for serious offenders, where Nealon was imprisoned along with the likes of Harold Shipman and the Soham murderer, Ian Huntley.

He said he took recourse in studying the law and fighting for justice – although refusing to admit guilt meant he had fewer privileges than other offenders, and ultimately was refused parole.

"It was devastating at first. Mentally I was destroyed. I had to detach myself from the regime and fight my own battle. I'm alive today and I've still got my sanity."

17 years for the to finally test the evidence! There are clearly serious issues about how the justice system works if it takes them 17 years to test the basic evidence. He's lucky it wasn't lost or destroyed.

And when you get released you get £46 and feck all help.

He is someone who deserves some compensation.

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He'll get the max comp at £1 million.

They sat on the evidence to prove his innocence for 17 years. They don't stand a chance, may as well pay him now.

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He'll get the max comp at £1 million.

They sat on the evidence to prove his innocence for 17 years. They don't stand a chance, may as well pay him now.

And he'll be charged for the board and lodging.

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Guest eight

And he'll be charged for the board and lodging.

If only he'd refused to accept it at the time!

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He'll get the max comp at £1 million.

They sat on the evidence to prove his innocence for 17 years. They don't stand a chance, may as well pay him now.

Jan 1997!

If he'd have got a shoebox in london he'd have made trillions in that time!

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Is a life sentence considered normal for attempted rape?

If he had pleaded quilty to it he would of received perhaps 5-7 years ? out in half that time for good behaviour. Because he was found guilty and pleaded innocent they gave him life because he was deemed to be a danger to the public as in denial, as far as i gathered from the radio the other night.

that would destroy most people, I think me also.

edit: I think he's entitled to the full compensation - one years top bankers bonus. (the full million)

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If he had pleaded quilty to it he would of received perhaps 5-7 years ? out in half that time for good behaviour. Because he was found guilty and pleaded innocent they gave him life because he was deemed to be a danger to the public as in denial, as far as i gathered from the radio the other night.

that would destroy most people, I think me also.

edit: I think he's entitled to the full compensation - one years top bankers bonus. (the full million)

It's a great legal system where admitting your guilt is the better option than proving your innocence.

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It's a great legal system where admitting your guilt is the better option than proving your innocence.

Only a bloke that did it would be likely to "admit"! :blink:

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If he had pleaded quilty to it he would of received perhaps 5-7 years ? out in half that time for good behaviour. Because he was found guilty and pleaded innocent they gave him life because he was deemed to be a danger to the public as in denial, as far as i gathered from the radio the other night.

that would destroy most people, I think me also.

edit: I think he's entitled to the full compensation - one years top bankers bonus. (the full million)

Correct. It was a 7 year sentence.

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Guest eight

It is a well known condition amongst certain long term prisoners known as the 'Mandela' or 'monk' effect whereby long periods of quiet reflection, feeding the mind with books and creeping maturity serves to create assured wisdom.

Less a life lost than a higher one lived.

Can we test that theory by incarcerating you for twenty years and see how you feel about it afterwards?

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