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Wurzel Of Highbridge

House Price Job Distortion.

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Hi xxxx,

I have just reviewed the jobs and the locations, the xxxxxx job looks interesting but I am afraid I am going to have to pass.

I will keep looking in the Bristol/Bridgwater area for now as the cost of renting/buying accommodation withing commuting distance of Bournemouth/Dorset looks prohibitive even on the good salary's offered.

Regards,

khards.

> On 16 December 2013 at 09:20 XXXXX <XXX@XXXXX.co.uk> wrote:

>

> Hi khards,

>

>

>

> Thanks for your time just now. Please find below web links to the two companies in Dorset seeking a Senior PHP Developer.

>

>

>

> · ************** (in Dorset) :

>

> · ************** (In Dorset), Bournemouth

>

>

>

> I welcome your thoughts on the above. Salaries vary from £35,000 up to £40,000.

>

>

>

> Would you be keen to progress?

>

>

>

> Kind Regards

>

> XXX XXXX

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£40K a year, a decent salary in most peoples books....not ebough to live on in Post Labour Britain, mainly due to the cost of housing.

If I could earn €48,000 here (£40k), then I could live like in a reasonably priced house like this: http://www.daft.ie/searchsale.daft?id=742244

I think it just goes to show how distorted things are in the UK. My last job here was quite low paid at €38k, new positions I am looking at are coming in around €45k. I could buy a old cheap house here, like 90% of the stock available to me in the UK for around €90k - in the UK I would be looking at a min of £160k.

you know the funny thing is that I don't find the property here cheap or a bargain, it is priced at around build cost + €100k per acre in a reasonable area. So your average 4 bedroom semi come in at between €120k and €220k depending upon location.

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Do one day a week. claim tax credits and housing benefit. Sorted.

He'd have to earn less than £70 a week to qualify for those.

With them he'd be on the HB single room rate (£100?), £70 wage, and £52 a week Tax Credits. About 10K a year.

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I quit my 55k/a city job 2 years ago as it wasn't worth it with the sky high prices and rent. Currently living as a property guardian up north paying 180/month rent all in, but increasingly tempted by a move to Ireland.

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I quit my 55k/a city job 2 years ago as it wasn't worth it with the sky high prices and rent. Currently living as a property guardian up north paying 180/month rent all in, but increasingly tempted by a move to Ireland.

This is the problem that they won't be able to get away from in the long term. £55k has been relegated to a salary that is hard to live on in London, BUT it is still a relatively high salary that the vast majority of London residents will never earn anything like.

I think that the only way to live reasonably in London on that type of salary is if you are part of a couple both earning similar. That is all well and good, but then you are reliant on the security of two jobs which makes long term planning a problem and things that would have been standard a few years ago like getting married and having kids become big risks at best.

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This is the problem that they won't be able to get away from in the long term. £55k has been relegated to a salary that is hard to live on in London, BUT it is still a relatively high salary that the vast majority of London residents will never earn anything like.

I think that the only way to live reasonably in London on that type of salary is if you are part of a couple both earning similar. That is all well and good, but then you are reliant on the security of two jobs which makes long term planning a problem and things that would have been standard a few years ago like getting married and having kids become big risks at best.

The squeeze is on. In that respect, at least, Osborne's housing bubble is very different from Brown's:

AWE-adjusted-RPI-BF.jpg

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he billion pound question that Cameron thinks he knows the answer to is this:

Does wage inflation lead or lag house price inflation? Cameron clearly thinks house price inflation leads wage inflation.

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he billion pound question that Cameron thinks he knows the answer to is this:

Does wage inflation lead or lag house price inflation? Cameron clearly thinks house price inflation leads wage inflation.

I think he thinks "A majority of people think rising house prices is good therefore I want house prices to rise. I know it is bad but it will keep me in power".

(Probably Brown etc thought the same).

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I think he thinks "A majority of people think rising house prices is good therefore I want house prices to rise. I know it is bad but it will keep me in power".

(Probably Brown etc thought the same).

I am sure you are right. If wages and HPI are even linked any more, it is certainly the wages that lag well behind.

How many people are there like the example in this thread, where someone has looked at their financial situation sensibly and found that it is not really worth working for £55k in London, even though that is a good salary compared to most.

For some reason, it seemed to be accepted years ago that the lower paid professions like nurses and teachers should not be able to afford to live in London, is it going to be accepted now that you need to be a senior professional to live there?

Benefits have taken up the slack so far to allow enough people to stay reasonably close and work in this type of profession, but I don't see how Cameron can bring the next level up into benefits as well. It will cost too much and would be a very difficult message to sell to people earning less but living well in other parts of the country.

Even if he could find a way to do it, it would be wrong to have such a large proportion of the working population on benefits, wouldn't it?

How long will it take before London becomes a very unattractive place to set up a business because, in addition to the other high costs, you cannot recruit enough good people into all of your sub-£60k positions?

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I might start a post next week entitled "unviable jobs" based on the salary, local rents and not factoring in any benifits.

It's gonna be a big thread - perhaps I should start a viable jobs thread, it might be much much smaller.

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I think he thinks "A majority of people think rising house prices is good therefore I want house prices to rise. I know it is bad but it will keep me in power".

(Probably Brown etc thought the same).

Cameron thinks??

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Cameron clearly thinks house price inflation leads wage inflation.

He also believes we are in a 'global race' with some of the poorest paid workers on the planet. How his help to buy scheme dovetails into this insight is not immediately clear.

To the untrained eye making housing more expensive looks like a stupid way to increase our international competitiveness.

Edited by wonderpup

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