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The Masked Tulip

Where Are The News Articles About Christmas Container Ships?

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For the last few years we have had stories of Christmas arriving, not from the North Pole on Santa's sleigh, but from China in a giant container ship.

Haven't seen such a story this year. Did I miss it or did the ship get hijacked off Somalia?

The only marketing spin I have seen have been stories that shops have sold out of Xbox Ones, PS4s, tablets, etc, only for the stores to be full of them a few days later.

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"selling out" of consoles and ipads etc is always a ridiculous con. They always ship out slightly less than demand so that they can "sell out" and then quietly restock the shelves the following week. Ridiculous!

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"selling out" of consoles and ipads etc is always a ridiculous con. They always ship out slightly less than demand so that they can "sell out" and then quietly restock the shelves the following week. Ridiculous!

Shhhhh! You're letting everybody in on the magic of consumer retailing.

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interesting article by Pesto that touches on a lot, but ends by saying the importance of PPI payouts to boost consumer spending.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-25364772

From Pesto

You might call it a leaving present from the now defunct Financial Services Authority, because it was the decision in April 2011 of the FSA's then chief executive Hector Sants to force the banks to pay restitution for mis-selling PPI credit insurance.

At the time the FSA estimated this would lead to the banks forking out "just" £4bn.

This was a wild under-estimate. It is now clear the banks will be handing more than £16bn to their customers, which represents a boost to consumers' balances of around 1% of GDP.

Since around three quarters of this PPI cash has been handed out over the past 18 months, this is probably the single biggest contributor to the revival of consumer spending.

The banks' sins of the past transformed into a current virtue, thanks to the intermediation of the regulator.

Wunderbar, surely.

It's coming to an end of course (although the spam texts and cold calls from the dratted claims firms would make you think otherwise).

Which is why it really matters that businesses, with their tails up a bit, become less risk averse and start investing.

As it happens, the business leaders to whom I chat are remarkably bullish right now. And although this is hideously unscientific and "intuitive", my sense is that there are some legs to this recovery, for all the drag of a lamentable trade performance.

So what's the biggest challenge or risk for 2014?

It is the probable phasing out of money and cheap-debt creation by the US and UK central banks (there is no chance of that happening in the eurozone).

Will the economies in the US and UK have achieved adequate lift-off velocity to withstand the choking off of the fuel of exceptional monetary stimulus?

Gawd only knows, because this is genuinely uncharted territory. If you pressed me, I would say I doubt it, but I could be wrong (as if you doubted that).

The PPI injection so far could equally be removed over a year by the BoE raising IRs by 1%...

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For the last few years we have had stories of Christmas arriving, not from the North Pole on Santa's sleigh, but from China in a giant container ship.

Haven't seen such a story this year. Did I miss it or did the ship get hijacked off Somalia?

The only marketing spin I have seen have been stories that shops have sold out of Xbox Ones, PS4s, tablets, etc, only for the stores to be full of them a few days later.

In previous years the arrival coincided with the first trip to the UK of latest worlds biggest container ship (trend first started by Maersk) to generate some free PR however this year Maersk's new class of monster ships have called in the UK in the Summer and Autumn so less news worthy. [We are one of the few countries to have ports big enough to handle them.]

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Iv got a container coming in Monday to Felixstowe,,,prices pretty close to as low as they have been on the China-Europe route..The big lines tried to push up the rates last month but they have fallen again.

More and more ships are calling at several ports on the way.They cant fill the ship with one big port.My container on this ship has visited more foreign countries than I have :lol:

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Iv got a container coming in Monday to Felixstowe,,,prices pretty close to as low as they have been on the China-Europe route..The big lines tried to push up the rates last month but they have fallen again.

More and more ships are calling at several ports on the way.They cant fill the ship with one big port.My container on this ship has visited more foreign countries than I have :lol:

Indeed the big Maersk ships are now carrying 3,000 TEU more than just 5 years ago (and with 20% less fuel burn) no port (apart from west coast of US) can actually have a market for the goods a full ship load of that size delivers. So if you are in Europe you just have to make sure you country has big enough ports on sensible route round from Suez....

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From Pesto

The PPI injection so far could equally be removed over a year by the BoE raising IRs by 1%...

Very true, which is why it's not going to happen unless there's a credit event (China, foremost) which forces Carney's hand.

Btw Pesto's nuts if he really thinks USUK has achieved 'escape velocity'. US first time unemployment claims had their worst performance last week since 2009. Retail sales may just have started to exceed 2007 levels but the US population is 6% bigger than 2007, in per capita terms they're back to 1998. The headline Producer Price Index (PPI) number was -0.1%. That's right, after a nearly a trillion dollars of QE this year the deflationary trend is still intact! The only thing growing over there (as here) are echo bubbles of the original housing Ponzi.

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Very true, which is why it's not going to happen unless there's a credit event (China, foremost) which forces Carney's hand.

Btw Pesto's nuts if he really thinks USUK has achieved 'escape velocity'. US first time unemployment claims had their worst performance last week since 2009. Retail sales may just have started to exceed 2007 levels but the US population is 6% bigger than 2007, in per capita terms they're back to 1998. The headline Producer Price Index (PPI) number was -0.1%. That's right, after a nearly a trillion dollars of QE this year the deflationary trend is still intact! The only thing growing over there (as here) are echo bubbles of the original housing Ponzi.

I don't think he does. if you read the article the second half of it is pretty bearish.

His program on the current state of the economy in China and whether it will collapse might be an interesting watch in January.

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