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Uruguay Legalises Marijuana

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http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/uruguay-legalises-marijuana-8996958.html

Uruguay has become the first country to create a national marketplace for legal marijuana, with the government regulating the production, sales and use of pot in a bold bid to control addiction and drug violence.

The Senate gave final legislative approval to the bill late last night, and President Jose Mujica, who campaigned for the legislation, is expected to sign it into law. The 78-year-old president has said he wants the market to begin operating next year.

“Today is an historic day. Many countries of Latin America, and many governments, will take this law as an example,” Sen. Constanza Moreira, a member of the governing Broad Front coalition, said as the bill passed with 16 votes in favour and 13 against. Congress' lower house approved the measure in late July.

The groundbreaking legislation to create a government-run marijuana industry was opposed by two-thirds Uruguayans, recent opinion polls said.

But Mujica, a former leftist guerrilla who spent years in jail as a younger man while others experimented with marijuana, went ahead with the legislation anyway. He argued the global drug war is a failure and said bureaucrats can do a better job of containing addictions and beating organized crime than police, soldiers and prison guards.

66% against and the govt runs with it.

It will be interesting to see what revenue the govt can bring in running it's own drug cartel.

Agree that the drug war is a failure, whoever I'm not certain bureaucrats will do a better job than others.....

If the tax revenues are large will others follow?

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A few things I know about Uraguay from a South American girlfriend of a friend:

Marijuana use there is high (excuse the pun).

People are largely opposed to this because they fear drug tourism, NOT for ethical/moral reasons.

Banning it costs billions, creates a black market run by violent organised criminals, and doesn't seem to stop anyone I know who wants it from getting it (indeed it was easier to get when I was at school than booze was).

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It's the eminently sensible thing to do IMO, now it's time for other governments to do the same starting with other South American countries.

It also appeals to my free food instincts as it's a recreational drug that you can grow at home.

That said I can't stand the effect it has upon people, especially the heavy users for whom every weekend consists of sitting on the sofa smoking it as the very height of their ambition. However I don't see my not liking something as a sufficient reason for having it banned, if that were the case there would be no XFactor-type garbage.

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It's the eminently sensible thing to do IMO, now it's time for other governments to do the same starting with other South American countries.

It also appeals to my free food instincts as it's a recreational drug that you can grow at home.

That said I can't stand the effect it has upon people, especially the heavy users for whom every weekend consists of sitting on the sofa smoking it as the very height of their ambition. However I don't see my not liking something as a sufficient reason for having it banned, if that were the case there would be no XFactor-type garbage.

Agree with all of that.

Proper drugs education (or simply sufficient social matureness and openness about the real issues) would likely follow from such a legalisation, even if it initially leads to more widespread use. And in my view, most of the negative effects have stemmed from the ultra high-THC hybrids, so possibly this would encourage people to grow their own rather than only having the option to buy the high-value skunk pedalled by dealers?

It also has a wide range of health benefits which should be further investigated.

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That said I can't stand the effect it has upon people, especially the heavy users for whom every weekend consists of sitting on the sofa smoking it as the very height of their ambition.

To be honest that's an unhelpful stereotype.

The only people I know who smoke every day are all on at least 30k+ a year.

I know TV folk, IT folk, solicitors, and countless other professionals who all have the odd joint of an evening.

I don't know Nigela unfortunately (but I'd like to).

I'm not adverse to it, but having quit smoking years ago I just sort of stopped doing it socially. No idea why it's illegal based on my personal experience. I've been far more out my head on alcohol than I've ever been on pot.

We could have a snack food based recovery!

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It's the eminently sensible thing to do IMO, now it's time for other governments to do the same starting with other South American countries.

It also appeals to my free food instincts as it's a recreational drug that you can grow at home.

That said I can't stand the effect it has upon people, especially the heavy users for whom every weekend consists of sitting on the sofa smoking it as the very height of their ambition. However I don't see my not liking something as a sufficient reason for having it banned, if that were the case there would be no XFactor-type garbage.

I'm not quite following why you're concerned by this?? If someone wants to spend their lives getting high on their own sofa :lol: then as long as it's not hurting anyone that's their business.

If you are concerned be concerned about the thousands of people up and down the country who every weekend get smashed on alcohol then start raging against other people, the police, shop windows, bus shelters, their own shadow and any other inanimate object that happens to cross their path.

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That's my view anyway. I'm not about to get drawn into a Student Grant (Viz) type debate on drugs - "Yah, caffeine's one of the worst actually, have you seen its effects on spiders? And sugar of course."

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That's my view anyway. I'm not about to get drawn into a Student Grant (Viz) type debate on drugs - "Yah, caffeine's one of the worst actually, have you seen its effects on spiders? And sugar of course."

:lol:

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I'm not quite following why you're concerned by this?? If someone wants to spend their lives getting high on their own sofa :lol: then as long as it's not hurting anyone that's their business.

It would threaten the foundations of the national religion, the NHS.

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That's my view anyway. I'm not about to get drawn into a Student Grant (Viz) type debate on drugs - "Yah, caffeine's one of the worst actually, have you seen its effects on spiders? And sugar of course."

Nope....but I would like to ,point us in the right direction please

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I don't understand the negativity about it. Whenever SWIM (someone who isn't me, for the spies) used, it greatly increased life experience. It was a revelation when SWIM finally understood the appeal of classical music, cooking complex recipes, literature and the arts. If legalised it would probably bankrupt SWIM. SWIM would be buying high end hifi, eating at very expensive restaurants, going to art galleries, going to museums and operas. Free time would be spent reading and listening to music. SWIM would also be very picky about living environment, very clean and simple uncluttered surroundings.

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I don't understand the negativity about it.

It's a drug that stimulates deep thought and contemplation. I strongly suspect that is one of the main reasons, if not the principal one, why this drug is illegal in most of the world, whereas alcohol use (and abuse) is widely encouraged.

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It's the eminently sensible thing to do IMO, now it's time for other governments to do the same starting with other South American countries.

It also appeals to my free food instincts as it's a recreational drug that you can grow at home.

That said I can't stand the effect it has upon people, especially the heavy users for whom every weekend consists of sitting on the sofa smoking it as the very height of their ambition. However I don't see my not liking something as a sufficient reason for having it banned, if that were the case there would be no XFactor-type garbage.

Black market stuff is very highly refined and concentrated and thus very dangerous. If people had the opportunity grow it themselves it would actually be a lot safer.

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If the tax revenues are large enough to be worth having, it'll still be cheaper to buy the stuff from criminals.

Obvious point, but if it's legal, they're not criminals they're small businesses.

There's a reason why folks don't all buy their booze from moonshiners as well.

People really really don't like to interact with criminals and unpleasant folk if it can be avoided.

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It's a drug that stimulates deep thought and contemplation. I strongly suspect that is one of the main reasons, if not the principal one, why this drug is illegal in most of the world, whereas alcohol use (and abuse) is widely encouraged.

Some say a chap called DuPont was reasposible for that http://www.erowid.or...culture11.shtml

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Legalisation of cannabis has happened in Colorado and Washington State in the US too.

I never understood why it is illegal. It would bring in tax revenues and they would be able to monitor it a lot more. It would also make people more docile. It seems like a no brainer to me.

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If the tax revenues are large enough to be worth having, it'll still be cheaper to buy the stuff from criminals.

I think you mean tax evaders

On the subject of price ,it would fall dramatically as it`s now set due to its illegality and to some extent the scale of production

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Obvious point, but if it's legal, they're not criminals they're small businesses.

Only if those small businesses are selling the stuff in accordance with the rules 'n regs, i.e. collecting the duty on the pot and passing it to the government. If they aren't doing that, they're criminals.

My point is that cannabis smokers in Uruguay have been used to not paying tax on it thus far when they've bought it from the cartels. When it starts to be sold legally with a duty attached, then the cartels aren't just going to call it a day. If the tax is significant, they'll be able to continue selling on the black market and still make a profit, while undercutting the official stuff.

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Only if those small businesses are selling the stuff in accordance with the rules 'n regs, i.e. collecting the duty on the pot and passing it to the government. If they aren't doing that, they're criminals.

My point is that cannabis smokers in Uruguay have been used to not paying tax on it thus far when they've bought it from the cartels. When it starts to be sold legally with a duty attached, then the cartels aren't just going to call it a day. If the tax is significant, they'll be able to continue selling on the black market and still make a profit, while undercutting the official stuff.

Indeed (unless they've got a really really good accountant/become multi-national, and then tax-dodging is all perfectly legal).

I believe the government are pricing it at the same rate it's currently being sold at on the streets (exactly because of the point you make), which seems smart.

Besides all this, even if they don't raise much in tax, they'll probably save in policing/imprisonment and other "war on drug" type overheads.

I should imagine pot being illegal over here costs literally billions when you factor policing, prison, and court costs in. Utterly senseless (but the Daily Wail is happy).

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Only if those small businesses are selling the stuff in accordance with the rules 'n regs, i.e. collecting the duty on the pot and passing it to the government. If they aren't doing that, they're criminals.

My point is that cannabis smokers in Uruguay have been used to not paying tax on it thus far when they've bought it from the cartels. When it starts to be sold legally with a duty attached, then the cartels aren't just going to call it a day. If the tax is significant, they'll be able to continue selling on the black market and still make a profit, while undercutting the official stuff.

+1

They have a full supply chain already in place so the government one is going to have to be very good to compete.

If the government decided to open supermarkets I don't think Tesco and co would be very worried....

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