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motch

Sound-Proofing A House.

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I have a couple of party walls in my flat that i'm looking to soundproof. Neighbours have the ocassional full on late party once in a while and i'm looking to have a crack at getting at least one bedroom wall soundproofed (or at least a decent reduction)

Anyone done this or had the experience in doing this sort of work?

Stud wall would lose too much room width so thinking more of 2" thick panels or similar.

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it's just not going to work, you'd need more than 2" to improve the situation on the wall much, but even if you did fix that, then you'll start to realise just how much sound is transmitted through the floor/ceiling.

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I once read soundproofing a room is like trying to build a waterproof boat. One small crack or hole and the whole design is compromised...

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It's the vibration through the structure that makes for the most irritating noises in your neighbours house.

ie stomping, booming bass.

Chances are that whatever you do will make little difference outside of finding a better place to party.

Basic and cheaper things to try; heavy carpet, damping curtains or panels, distance, direction, etc...

Physical Techniques to Reduce Noise Impacts

Overall, its hard to make things quiet when they aren't.

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Been there!

IMO, the only way is to go detached.

As other have said, you're always going to get flanking transmission through the structure. Total separation is the only answer.

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Been there!

IMO, the only way is to go detached.

As other have said, you're always going to get flanking transmission through the structure. Total separation is the only answer.

Noise v Cold.........buy next to a older friendly quiet person that is not hard of hearing, that doesn't own a barking dog, can then be happily attached, peaceful and warm. ;)

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It's very expensive, you'll lose wall space and floor height, and is not effective at certain frequencies. I looked into this due to a noisy neighbour and was shocked at the costs!

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Noise v Cold.........buy next to a older friendly quiet person that is not hard of hearing, that doesn't own a barking dog, can then be happily attached, peaceful and warm. ;)

I've thought about that trade off before.

It's fine until they move!

I don't think the heat savings are that great - especially on a semi with only one shared wall.

Edited by oldsport

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It's very expensive, you'll lose wall space and floor height, and is not effective at certain frequencies. I looked into this due to a noisy neighbour and was shocked at the costs!

Cheers for the replies so far.

miggy - did you lose floor height through trying to reduce sound from neighbours above/below or just from next door neighbours?

Luckily I live on the top floor of my apartment block, and in a corner, so there's only two flats that could possibly cause noise issues, unluckily one of them is the main problem in the block. I must stress it's not all the time, only on a saturday night and they haven't had any parties there for at least a month.

From what I can gather the mass added is the major factor, along with no gaps anywhere, and the flanking issues discussed on this thread. I know it wouldn't eliminate it, but halving the sound coming through would be nice if possible.

Yes the price is not cheap and the smaller room would cost about £400, I could do the work by myself and a mate.

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it's just not going to work, you'd need more than 2" to improve the situation on the wall much, but even if you did fix that, then you'll start to realise just how much sound is transmitted through the floor/ceiling.

Would something like having 2" wide x 1/2" or 1" deep battens on the wall then fixing said 2" soundproofing boards onto them help the wall situation? by having a sort of mini stud wall? (it's not addressing the flanking issues though i know)

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If you can't insulate, the next best thing is to mask the unwanted noise with some noise of your own making. I use a brown noise track on an ipod hooked up to some bose multimedia speakers. It works great to mask out even annoying low frequencies. Brown or pink noise is actually quite relaxing at the right level.

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Have you tried fixing your speakers to the party wall and playing Barry Manilow very loud on Sunday mornings?

I am told that death metal played at maximum volume on repeat - and then go away for the weekend cures most noisy neighbours.

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You could try this approach:

https://groups.google.com/d/msg/uk.legal/q40bCsGBi9c/vp30tHRYXdUJ

That is similar to the post I was trying to find, but couldn't. In that one the guy rigged up some electronics which interfered badly with the neighbours hifi, and turned it on whenever they played music. After consistently turning it on and off at the right times, he saw his neighbours loading the hifi into their car to take it to be repaired!

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Drastic Action?

Less drastic I recall an effective way if someone was playing music too loud in university Hall of residence was to create an earth loop by connecting a wire from an earth connection in a wall socket to water pipes and scraping/making and breaking contact repeatedly. This seemed to work for adjacent rooms and may work if earth is shared with your neighbour.

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My issue was with a downstairs neighbour and my problem was the bass. The cheaper sound proofing options really don't help much against that as the sound travels through the building structure.

I did add some sound proofing under the floorboards as there was a huge gap, insulation, and some high quality carpet underlay which did help with other frequencies.

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There isn't much you can do about sub woofer, heavy base. but there is special acoustic plasterboard that you can buy. Might have room for two layers. For low frequency noise reduction there is something called 'green glue' and although people do create sound proof home cinema's and recording studio's in the homes, I doubt any is a perfect solution as well as taking up a lot of space as others have pointed out.

Industrial ear plugs would probably be better.

Edited by aSecureTenant

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You could try this approach:

https://groups.google.com/d/msg/uk.legal/q40bCsGBi9c/vp30tHRYXdUJ

That is similar to the post I was trying to find, but couldn't. In that one the guy rigged up some electronics which interfered badly with the neighbours hifi, and turned it on whenever they played music. After consistently turning it on and off at the right times, he saw his neighbours loading the hifi into their car to take it to be repaired!

Which is illegal mind... under several directives... but funny and very intelligent fix if they don't get found out.

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