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EmmaRoid

The Young Are Doomed Ft.com

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There was a similar piece in the telegraph maybe a month ago, showed it to my dad who, in his 3 bedroom house with several unused rooms, said "we need high house prices top make up for insufficient pensions"

Err

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There was a similar piece in the telegraph maybe a month ago, showed it to my dad who, in his 3 bedroom house with several unused rooms, said "we need high house prices top make up for insufficient pensions"

Err

Did your dad make no provision for his old age, other than the state pension?

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Did your dad make no provision for his old age, other than the state pension?

He had a private pension and savings and then invested it badly through an IFA over the years, chasing bad bets latest fads band wagons etc

Gave a lot of money to my brother in 2004 to get on the ladder, that kind of thing

It's more a question of it not affording the upkeep of his house

Edited by Si1

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He had a private pension and savings and then invested it badly through an IFA over the years, chasing bad bets latest fads band wagons etc

Gave a lot of money to my brother in 2004 to get on the ladder, that kind of thing

It's more a question of it not affording the upkeep of his house

IFAs :angry:.

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He had a private pension and savings and then invested it badly through an IFA over the years, chasing bad bets latest fads band wagons etc

Gave a lot of money to my brother in 2004 to get on the ladder, that kind of thing

It's more a question of it not affording the upkeep of his house

Would he had been better off with a savings account paying 2%?

Investments can go down and usually do but the spivs in the city still sting you for condition.

Ill take my 2% compound interest any day.

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I read that last night and I must confess I had a chuckle when I imagined the reaction here to the third comment (Nuages0).

I still can't decide whether the guy's for real or it's a subtle Monty Python parody.

Quite. He doesn't seem to get the concept of equality. From my understanding of recent history, the experiences he describes were standard for young and old at the time, unlike say, oh I dunno, today?

Still I'm sure there's a term for the desire to make other eople suffer like you have through no fault of theirs.

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Quite. He doesn't seem to get the concept of equality. From my understanding of recent history, the experiences he describes were standard for young and old at the time, unlike say, oh I dunno, today?

Still I'm sure there's a term for the desire to make other eople suffer like you have through no fault of theirs.

Plus the goons who bang on about ice on the inside of the windows etc never point out the things that were obviously better then than now e.g. a generally improving standard of living for the median household rather than a worsening one, better social cohesion due to lower economic inequality, greater job security and housing large enough for a family affordable on a single average wage. Their arguments always take the form of "Well X was worse back then, therefore you have no right to complain about anything".

X = central heating, electronics, food, the threat of nuclear war

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Try THIS LINK, I would be interested to know if it works for you.

The trick to posing an article from the FT is to search for the headline/title in Google then use the link that google provides in the search results - it will come in the form of long URL that uses Google as a redirect.

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He had a private pension and savings and then invested it badly through an IFA over the years, chasing bad bets latest fads band wagons etc

Gave a lot of money to my brother in 2004 to get on the ladder, that kind of thing

It's more a question of it not affording the upkeep of his house

Don't you just love it when your parents seem to favour handing over large wads of cash to a sibling who invariably seems to vapourise that cash in various follies. :angry:

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As someone who is going to find it difficult to vote with any degree of enthusiasm at the next General Election, I would point out that the older you are, the more likely you are to vote.

The young tend not to vote. Hence the parties pay some attention to older voters but hardly any to younger ones and that's why they get stuffed.

That's just one reason why Russell Brand's advice is stupid - he's rich enough not to be adversely affected by the political process.

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Don't you just love it when your parents seem to favour handing over large wads of cash to a sibling who invariably seems to vapourise that cash in various follies. :angry:

A phenomenon of Biblical proportions.

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And yet there are several people on this thread who think Thatcher was great. Gobshites.

Maybe they lived through the Wilson /Callaghan years ...........you think...?

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A phenomenon of Biblical proportions.

For the last 25 years I have steered my parents finances as they are financially clueless - it starts with privatisation shares, tessas, PEPs, ISA;s, building scoiety carpet bagging, energy efficiency works on their home, corporate bonds, and ends with zopa and Funding Circle. Whilst I do this my feckless brother has appeared to have perfected the art of vaporising those same gains :angry:

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As someone who is going to find it difficult to vote with any degree of enthusiasm at the next General Election, I would point out that the older you are, the more likely you are to vote.

The young tend not to vote. Hence the parties pay some attention to older voters but hardly any to younger ones and that's why they get stuffed.

That's just one reason why Russell Brand's advice is stupid - he's rich enough not to be adversely affected by the political process.

Might be nice if we could start from an assumption that the average person would cast their vote in a fashion which views ******ing other people over as a bad idea? Especially since some people love pouring on the scorn regarding young people- their education is crap, they're useless etc etc. Mostly erroneous nonsense, but believed all the same. And then they kick 'em via the ballot box. Classy.

The hypocrisy within some people (of all ages) is breathtaking. I have a relative who seldom lets an opportunity to make completely outrageous comments about some members of the close family, whilst at other times espousing how much of a family-centric person they are and that the family is key to their morals etc. I'm not talking about reasonable criticisms of behaviour, I'm talking about cheap shots about a niece's appearance behind her back.

EnglishRose2013 | November 24 11:21am | Permalink

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I am sympathetic to the young as I have 3 20 somethings and teenagers. However life has always been quite tough. 30 years ago I made over 100 job applications after university. We paid 50% of our net pay each of us for childcare at the start (no nursery vouchers, paid maternity leave, tax credits in those days). The mortgage was very expensive (12% rates) and we had to live miles out of London even then as plenty do not. In contrast one of my daughters has had (me) her 25% deposit paid and her father paid the £10k stamp duty on her one bed London flat and the 3 children graduated debt free as I funded them through university. I am happy to help them but I had no help to get on the housing ladder and those 95% mortgages when tax rates and interest rates were much higher were a massive burden in our 20s.

I had my babies about 15 - 20 years before my contemporaries and always worked full time, What I would say to young people is get on with babies. There is never a perfect time. It is always hard work but if you can start them in your 20s it normally pays off. Same with buying a place - get that one bed in Luton above the chip shop. You have to start somewhere. Furnish it with cast offs - do what we did in the 80s, get all the baby stuff second hand, never eat out. It is doable if you do that and pick a wise career. It has never been a bed of roses.

It's hard to know where to start really.

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Maybe they lived through the Wilson /Callaghan years ...........you think...?

Ahh. . . Harold and Jim. Now, if only they had been able to live off North Sea oil like Maggie.

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