Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
gf3

A History Of Britain In Numbers

Recommended Posts

... within living memory, hardly any kids and relatively few adults had their own bed, let alone bedroom ...

... as recently as the 1970s, the majority of households didn't have a private bathroom ...

... home ownership 100 years ago was about 20%. It crept up to 50% in the 1970s ...

(Lots more. Like, think of living at today's prices but on 5% of today's minimum wage).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... within living memory, hardly any kids and relatively few adults had their own bed, let alone bedroom ...

... as recently as the 1970s, the majority of households didn't have a private bathroom ...

... home ownership 100 years ago was about 20%. It crept up to 50% in the 1970s ...

(Lots more. Like, think of living at today's prices but on 5% of today's minimum wage).

But you try and tell the young people today that... and they won't believe ya' (in a Yorkshire accent)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... within living memory, hardly any kids and relatively few adults had their own bed, let alone bedroom ...

... as recently as the 1970s, the majority of households didn't have a private bathroom ...

... home ownership 100 years ago was about 20%. It crept up to 50% in the 1970s ...

(Lots more. Like, think of living at today's prices but on 5% of today's minimum wage).

A majority of households with no private bathroom in the 70s?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... within living memory, hardly any kids and relatively few adults had their own bed, let alone bedroom ...

... as recently as the 1970s, the majority of households didn't have a private bathroom ...

... home ownership 100 years ago was about 20%. It crept up to 50% in the 1970s ...

(Lots more. Like, think of living at today's prices but on 5% of today's minimum wage).

So what?

Just because the living standard in the UK has improved since the 1970s doesn't excuse the fact that the British obsession with house prices has significantly driven down the standard of living from what it could be. My dad grew up in the US in a 2 bedroom house with 10 brothers and sisters, no indoor bathroom, and without access to clean water. After retiring having worked as a builder, he now lives in a house that would sell for about £1 million if it was located anywhere in the UK (it would sell for about $200k where he lives in California).

New build homes in the UK are amongst the smallest in Europe. The build quality and size of most houses are really nothing other than pathetic. Most of them should be torn down and rebuilt properly, but planning law makes that all but impossible and the NIMBY/my-home-is-my-pension crowd is perfectly happy with the situation (including Andrew Dilnot, who is the moron who decided that baby boomers aren't getting enough subsidies as is and that the state should give free social care to millionaire pensioners).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what?

Just because the living standard in the UK has improved since the 1970s doesn't excuse the fact that the British obsession with house prices has significantly driven down the standard of living from what it could be. My dad grew up in the US in a 2 bedroom house with 10 brothers and sisters, no indoor bathroom, and without access to clean water. After retiring having worked as a builder, he now lives in a house that would sell for about £1 million if it was located anywhere in the UK (it would sell for about $200k where he lives in California).

New build homes in the UK are amongst the smallest in Europe. The build quality and size of most houses are really nothing other than pathetic. Most of them should be torn down and rebuilt properly, but planning law makes that all but impossible and the NIMBY/my-home-is-my-pension crowd is perfectly happy with the situation (including Andrew Dilnot, who is the moron who decided that baby boomers aren't getting enough subsidies as is and that the state should give free social care to millionaire pensioners).

Indeed a small box on a modern development may bring significant unhapiness where as an older property with no mod cons and a bit of space around it may lead to a happier lifestyle even if there is perceived deprivation because of a lack of modern amenities. All the modern technology and ''improvements'' in living standards hasn't brought about any extra happiness as the younger generation are expected to make do with high tech rabbit hutches.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed a small box on a modern development may bring significant unhapiness where as an older property with no mod cons and a bit of space around it may lead to a happier lifestyle even if there is perceived deprivation because of a lack of modern amenities. All the modern technology and ''improvements'' in living standards hasn't brought about any extra happiness as the younger generation are expected to make do with high tech rabbit hutches.

So what you seem to be complaining about is that you are only the 2nd most lucky generation in the history of the world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed a small box on a modern development may bring significant unhapiness where as an older property with no mod cons and a bit of space around it may lead to a happier lifestyle even if there is perceived deprivation because of a lack of modern amenities. All the modern technology and ''improvements'' in living standards hasn't brought about any extra happiness as the younger generation are expected to make do with high tech rabbit hutches.

Correct, strength in local collective community strength has been replaced for material toilets, hot water, self, loneliness,weakness, sadness and fluffy nothingness. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I caught that show as well. Seemed like they were trying to make us feel better about the rapidly declining living standards in this country. I found some of it suspect. The majority of houses did not have bathrooms in the 1970s? Rubbish.

Living standards in this country peaked in the early 2000s and have been falling ever since. Plastic tat from Chinese sweatshops does not make up for cheaper food, fuel, energy and housing costs. Also pretty sure the NHS is worse now than it was in the 1990s, despite piles and piles of money being dumped all over doctors and NHS managers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I caught that show as well. Seemed like they were trying to make us feel better about the rapidly declining living standards in this country. I found some of it suspect. The majority of houses did not have bathrooms in the 1970s? Rubbish.

Living standards in this country peaked in the early 2000s and have been falling ever since. Plastic tat from Chinese sweatshops does not make up for cheaper food, fuel, energy and housing costs. Also pretty sure the NHS is worse now than it was in the 1990s, despite piles and piles of money being dumped all over doctors and NHS managers.

....Kids don't need special own bedrooms, lots of toys, home comforts.....what they want is brothers and sisters, a safe and comforting home with caring stable parents that are there, a good education.......pods and lonely pads with parents out working without time and no or few siblings is not what kids need or want. ;)

Edited by winkie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's right. We should count ourselves very lucky not to be living in caves any more. Now get back to work, your rent needs paying.

After listening to the program I was just thinking about my Gran she was one of 11 children in what would have been a three bedroomed house. When she was 13 she left home and went into service. Working in a big house cleaning extra. I would have thought the reason she lift was because of desperate poverty. I know she went to London for a while where she had kids but moved back down to the forest of dean when London was being bombed. The house she got had no electric, gas or mains water she drawn from a well. certainly not a lucky generation in the early years.

My dad had his early years living in that house but when he got married he bought a house for £120 one room up one room down about 12ft square no toilet or bathroom. My parents still live there today because it came with a third or an acre of land they were able to extend.not the lucky generation again in the early years.

I cr*pped out buying at the peak of the last housing bubble I haven't made anything out of houses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't understand your point.

I agree that civilisation itself is incredibly fragile. That people living in Somalia are worse off as were our forefathers.

Is your point that we should be accepting of a fall in living standards because such standards were only a recent phenomenon? That we should stop complaining and that we should be accepting and not question why such standards are falling and change matters?

What exactly is your point and why?

Just read the comment about modern houses being like rabbit hutches and thought a lot of people would have thought they were in heaven owning one years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just read the comment about modern houses being like rabbit hutches and thought a lot of people would have thought they were in heaven owning one years ago.

1998: UK population 58.5m, number of houses 25m, average house price 65K

2013: UK population 64.0m, number of houses 28m, average house price 170K

That's where the frustration lies with many people, not with comparisons of living standards 40 or more years ago.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After listening to the program I was just thinking about my Gran she was one of 11 children in what would have been a three bedroomed house. When she was 13 she left home and went into service. Working in a big house cleaning extra. I would have thought the reason she lift was because of desperate poverty. I know she went to London for a while where she had kids but moved back down to the forest of dean when London was being bombed. The house she got had no electric, gas or mains water she drawn from a well. certainly not a lucky generation in the early years.

My dad had his early years living in that house but when he got married he bought a house for £120 one room up one room down about 12ft square no toilet or bathroom. My parents still live there today because it came with a third or an acre of land they were able to extend.not the lucky generation again in the early years.

I cr*pped out buying at the peak of the last housing bubble I haven't made anything out of houses.

Hehe. My grandparents had similar circumstances to yours, but they owned property because they lived in Ireland - that's what a Land War can achieve, distribution of assets.

The Irish pissed it up against the wall by voting against their own interest with subsidies for bankers, but some of my family made fortunes from selling the hard won land rights at the right time.

My own parents sold out of London in the mid-70s to pursue the romantic dream in the oul' country, but didn't double down on the property gamble. In fact they sold to an Irish developer who is now one of Britain's wealthiest men. Doh! 'Tis all about the trend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A majority of households with no private bathroom in the 70s?

A shared bathroom.

Either an HMO, or an unmodernised house whose occupants would use communal facilities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A majority of households with no private bathroom in the 70s?

I told this story before but i'm 44 and when I was little we lived in a 2 up 2 down 1700's workers terraced cottage in Tring. I had no bathroom and no inside toilet. The bog was at the end of the garden and we had baths in a big Tin bath in-front of the fire.

The council came along in about 1973 and built a single story extension that housed a small galley kitchen and a separate bathroom with sink and inside toilet. Luxury!

M

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A shared bathroom.

Either an HMO, or an unmodernised house whose occupants would use communal facilities.

Certainly in the late 60s there were stacks of bedsits or even so called flats with shared bathrooms, and I don't suppose things changed much for the next 10 years or so, not until the owners of big, old and often pretty dilapidated houses realised they could make a killing by turning 6 bedsits into maybe 3 self contained flats and selling them. Or else sell the house to someone who had the money to do it.

Bedsits did usually have some sort of basic cooking facilities, though. By the late 60s it would often be a Baby Belling, rather than the gas ring you read about in so many novels of the 50s or earlier.

Edited by Mrs Bear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a child in the 1960s my wife lived in a house with an outside WC and no bathroom.

My first house was a Victorian terrace. The bathroom in it dated from the 1970s. An elderly neighbour told me a lot of bathroom conversions/additions were done about that time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

he now lives in a house that would sell for about £1 million if it was located anywhere in the UK (it would sell for about $200k where he lives in California).

..Got to pick you up on that…

Thats obviously an exaggeration of some kind…not sure what you are comparing in terms of house quality , but for a certainty even within California there are areas of small an expensive houses…I have a friend who moved to San Fransico and his house is small and much more expensive than mine in the UK….

all I'm saying is make fair comparisons or the arguments get lost….

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A shared bathroom.

Either an HMO, or an unmodernised house whose occupants would use communal facilities.

I'm still a bit surprised by the idea that the majority of households having no private bathrooms in the 70s. I should listen to the program.

eg does an HMO count as 4 households if there are 4 bedrooms?

Edited by The B.L.T.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still a bit surprised by the idea that the majority of households having no private bathrooms in the 70s. I should listen to the program.

eg does an HMO count as 4 households if there are 4 bedrooms?

..sound like BS to me even poor areas of Wales had private bathrooms then…I remember one house in our street without, and we thought that was odd...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still a bit surprised by the idea that the majority of households having no private bathrooms in the 70s. I should listen to the program.

eg does an HMO count as 4 households if there are 4 bedrooms?

I'd expect so, yes. Though not student housing, 'cos that doesn't count as their main home. OTOH, there were a lot fewer students and a lot more adults in HMOs back then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   219 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.